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Carol the Impaler
12-09-2010, 10:46 AM
My shower has horrible water pressure. If you like the feel of a soft spring rain as you shower, well, my shower is the shower for you. If you have a ton of hair to try to wash and rinse every day... it's The Suck.

I've taken the shower head off an soaked in in white vinegar to get all the deposits and crud out. I've taken a look to see if there is a flow regulator in there, but I'd have to take the thing apart to get past the particle filter (I don't know what it's called).

I rent, so there may be a limit to what I can do personally. Do those shower heads advertised to increase water pressure actually work?

What can I do to increase the water pressure in my shower?

panman_1960
12-09-2010, 10:55 AM
What is the flow like when the head is off? Does it flow with force, like out of an open garden hose, or is it a weak dribble? If the flow is good, get a new shower head. If not, I'm not sure what you can do as a renter, other than request to the landlord it be checked.

later, Tom.

CookingWithGas
12-09-2010, 10:59 AM
If there is a flow regulator you would probably have seen it inside the fitting when you removed it. It looks like a washer with a too-small hole. It may be a low-flow shower head, rather than having a regulator stuck in it.

Is your low pressure limited to just the shower head?

I had low water pressure in my house and tried this one from Oxygenics (http://www.oxygenics.com/skincaregallery.html) (which was sold by and branded as Sharper Image) and found that although the lower flow really does the job just as well without extending time in the shower, it was not quite as comfortable (hard spray), plus it was very noisy.

I'm a guy without all that much hair so don't know this would work for you.....

Carol the Impaler
12-09-2010, 11:17 AM
What is the flow like when the head is off? Does it flow with force, like out of an open garden hose, or is it a weak dribble? If the flow is good, get a new shower head. If not, I'm not sure what you can do as a renter, other than request to the landlord it be checked.

later, Tom.

Yeah, IIRC, it's not an intimidating flow coming out of the tub faucet, either. Sigh.

awldune
12-09-2010, 11:44 AM
Something you could try if you are desparate:

Go to the store and buy a "water saver" shower attachment. It's like a washer that screws onto the shower neck and the shower head screws onto it.

Use this without a shower head, and you will have a very strong jet of water that blasts the shampoo right out and gives a decent neck/shoulder massage. I loved mine but the wife likes a gentle spray for some reason. Fortunately our new house has better pressure.

GiantRat
12-09-2010, 03:31 PM
If you're in a major metro city (like ibpka... huh?) and in an apartment building or something, the floor you're on might be the problem. Especially in older buildings, pressure boosters (or whatever they're called) are something most buildings don't care about.

Carol the Impaler
12-09-2010, 04:36 PM
If you're in a major metro city (like ibpka... huh?) and in an apartment building or something, the floor you're on might be the problem. Especially in older buildings, pressure boosters (or whatever they're called) are something most buildings don't care about.

"Nebraska, The Cornhusker State, entered the United States of America as the 37th state. Nebraska had been part of the Louisiana Purchase in 1803. The state is actually named after the Platte River from the French meaning "broad river." The Omaha Indians called the river "ibpka" also meaning "ibpka" but it could be interpreted as 'ibpka'."

Major metro, but in a duplex.

Are there any of those shower heads that claim to increase water pressure that actually work?

Al Bundy
12-09-2010, 05:44 PM
You need to install a "low flow" shower head. The result will feel like increased pressure with the same volume you have available.

needscoffee
12-09-2010, 06:12 PM
I use a very cheap one similar to this (http://www.amazon.com/Ultra-Saver-Showerhead-Chrome-Plated/dp/B000H5WY9I/ref=sr_1_6?s=hi&ie=UTF8&qid=1291936180&sr=1-6). It has the best pressure I've been able to find.

SeaDragonTattoo
12-09-2010, 06:26 PM
I'm a renter, too, and have always had good results with low-flow shower heads. My current place has terrible pressure (except the toilet seems fine - weird), the worst of all the places I've lived in, but once I put water saver heads on my kitchen sink and on the shower ($5-$8 each), it's fine. Think of the low-flow as putting your thumb over the front of a hose - less water comes out but it will be a much harder stream on the receiving end. I know what it's like to have a hard time getting shampoo out of my hair!

wonky
12-09-2010, 06:36 PM
I have a low-flow shower head and it really does help with the pressure. What I don't like about it in the winter is its tendency to mist. Brr.

Reply
12-09-2010, 07:17 PM
Fourting? Fifthing? the low-flow showerhead suggestion. It saves water and energy too.

Carol the Impaler
12-09-2010, 09:05 PM
Excellent. There's an Ace Hardware down the street. I shall stop by tomorrow!

FluffyBob
12-09-2010, 09:05 PM
Another recommendation for the low flow head. I have one similar to, but not quite the same as needscoffee's link. Wait a sec, here (http://www.21st-century-citizen.com/2007/10/03/a-simple-step-you-can-take-install-a-low-flow-shower-head-save-water-money-carbon/) it is.

It gives a very intense spray that I actually prefer to fancier heads, plus it has that little 'off' button that can be handy for soaping up. I have seen them at the hardware store for five dollars which is a steal.

Alternatively you can buy a wand that you can direct the spray with for about thirty bucks. I have not found one that has as good a spray as the above mentioned low flow head though.

flano1
12-10-2010, 08:21 AM
Turbo 2000!

cantara
12-10-2010, 09:34 AM
I had recently replaced a faucet in the house and had to turn off the water at the meter in the basement. When I had finished (including the shut offs under the sink) I neglected to turn the main back up to full pressure. The difference was noticeable. It may be worth checking.

My dad recently had the city repair the water line from the main to his house. It turns out the old lead pipes were clogged. I'm not sure how he identified that the problem was within the city responsibility. He said his shower was like someone peeing on him.

Gbro
12-10-2010, 10:31 AM
I had a similar problem and solved it with this shower head,
http://www.acehardwareoutlet.com/ProductDetails.aspx?SKU=49540

Its a quality product made in the USA and comes with 2 disc's very easy to clean and just great. I have had 6" diameter shower heads and this little one is much better IMHO and cheap!

Carol the Impaler
12-10-2010, 10:47 AM
So, the consensus is low-flow shower head. All in favor say aye?

carnivorousplant
12-10-2010, 10:58 AM
Aye.

KneadToKnow
12-10-2010, 11:06 AM
except the toilet seems fine - weird

Unless you have an atypical situation, you should know that the pressure of the water when you flush your toilet has virtually nothing to do with the water pressure in your pipes. Flushing a standard toilet just releases the water that's standing in the tank, and gravity does the work from there. The tank then gets refilled from the incoming water supply.

SeaDragonTattoo
12-10-2010, 12:35 PM
Right. I thought that sounded funny after I posted it. What I meant was that it refills fine, in what seems like a normal to a little faster than normal amount of time. I would think with the low pressure, the tank would take a half hour to refill, but it's just a minute or two. Same as any other toilet with a standard tank. If I fill a gallon container in the kitchen it takes longer to fill that with the faucet turned on all the way than it does for the toilet to refill. Anyway, it's not a big deal. Drawback to being on the top floor maybe, but worth it in many other respects!

ChickenLegs
12-11-2010, 10:44 AM
Here's the trouble:

http://mises.org/daily/2007

Showerheads or limited to 2.5 gallons per minute at 80 gallons per minute by federal law.

When they first came out with the law, manufacturers just installed a small flow restrictor in their existing designs. But some consumers were smart enough to just remove this piece and get a good shower again. So the law was revised to require manufacturers to produce shower heads that are not easily modified.

A few years ago, I heard you could buy shower heads of foreign manufacture on the internets that exceeed the 2.5 gpm limitation. Of course, you'd be a criminal if you actually installed it...

Carol the Impaler
12-11-2010, 11:22 AM
Oooooo.... kind of thrilling, the thought of buying a black market shower head.... !!

Evil Jon
12-11-2010, 11:30 AM
I'd go with the recommendations here:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vMITcQUe-9M

Carol the Impaler
12-11-2010, 06:37 PM
I dunno. I think I could handle the Commando 450. But then, I come from hearty Midwestern stock.

BigT
12-12-2010, 08:17 AM
Here's the trouble:

http://mises.org/daily/2007

Showerheads or limited to 2.5 gallons per minute at 80 gallons per minute by federal law.

When they first came out with the law, manufacturers just installed a small flow restrictor in their existing designs. But some consumers were smart enough to just remove this piece and get a good shower again. So the law was revised to require manufacturers to produce shower heads that are not easily modified.

A few years ago, I heard you could buy shower heads of foreign manufacture on the internets that exceeed the 2.5 gpm limitation. Of course, you'd be a criminal if you actually installed it...

I have trouble with my current shower getting to the bottom of the tub. I thought it was just because the stream is angled funny, but maybe not. I may try to clean and reuse my old shower head.

Carol the Impaler
12-12-2010, 02:07 PM
Hey, just installed my new low-flow shower head and wept with joy. Thanks guys for helping me out. I really appreciate it.

SeaDragonTattoo
12-12-2010, 04:37 PM
Woo Hoo! Good for you! I never understood the low-flow hate. They make for stronger showers! Enjoy.

Magiver
12-12-2010, 05:20 PM
When they first came out with the law, manufacturers just installed a small flow restrictor in their existing designs. But some consumers were smart enough to just remove this piece and get a good shower again. So the law was revised to require manufacturers to produce shower heads that are not easily modified..... Yes, because nobody in America has a drill. :)

casimir3
10-14-2012, 02:02 PM
How about this: I have decent water pressure and used to have a great shower. However, I recently installed a "watering can" type shower head when I installed a new clawfoot tub. My wife loves bathing in the deep tub, but hates the void in the middle of the stream of water that comes out of the shower head. I've removed both flow restrictors and the pressure is fine, but there's still a spiraling action to the flow that leaves a space in its interior. For a short and slender person with long, thick hair like my wife, this is a particular problem. What would happen if I drilled out the five holes in the center of the head to make the holes bigger? Might this increase the flow to the interior of the cone of water? The shower head is new and was expensive, so I'm hesitant to experiment blindly. Thanks.

johnpost
10-14-2012, 02:12 PM
the head (wife's) pivots and move and you don't have to drill it.

kanicbird
10-14-2012, 02:26 PM
How about this: I have decent water pressure and used to have a great shower. However, I recently installed a "watering can" type shower head when I installed a new clawfoot tub. My wife loves bathing in the deep tub, but hates the void in the middle of the stream of water that comes out of the shower head. I've removed both flow restrictors and the pressure is fine, but there's still a spiraling action to the flow that leaves a space in its interior. For a short and slender person with long, thick hair like my wife, this is a particular problem. What would happen if I drilled out the five holes in the center of the head to make the holes bigger? Might this increase the flow to the interior of the cone of water? The shower head is new and was expensive, so I'm hesitant to experiment blindly. Thanks.

As I see it you have nothing to lose but a showerhead that is not working for you...er your wife. I personally have not found a showerhead that beats the simple under $10 metal one with the flow restrictor removed or drilled out, so perhaps just getting that type could solve the problem.

casimir3
10-29-2012, 06:18 PM
I came to agree with kanicbird and experimentally drilled out just the central 5 holes on my shower head. It was easy with a little oil on the drill bit and didn't make a mess of my pretty, expensive chrome head at all. AND, it definitely reduced the hole in the center of the stream. Upon hearing the good news, my darling sniffed, "Well, I'll TRY it, but it's still not what I want." However, all of us who've been married more than a couple of years understand that sometimes plausible deniability (or "I may not have done what you WANT, but I have done what I can to satisfy your NEED") is the best one can hope for. I'll see how her next shower goes and drill out more holes as necessary, but none of my fears (screwed up stream, dribbles, pressure collapse, mutilated chrome) came to pass. And yes, I could just put up the old $10 fixture, which always worked great, but it's ugly and I have a certain relationship investment in the new fixture at this point...

The two-armed strut of triumph will follow shortly, I'm sure. Thanks for the advice.

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