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AClockworkMelon
02-02-2011, 07:58 PM
1.) What music file do most car CD players read?
2.) If MP3, why would a particular car not play files from a disc I've made? Other computers and my 360 can play the music but the car player won't.

This is the first time in a long while that I've used discs for anything. I typically just transfer the music files themselves directly to my consoles and MP3 players.

Thanks in advance for any help offered.

jz78817
02-02-2011, 08:18 PM
um, it's kind of important that you tell what CD player you have. is it a factory unit? if so, what kind of car? if it's aftermarket, what brand?

Thudlow Boink
02-02-2011, 08:38 PM
Most older car CD players don't play music files at all; they just play plain old-fashioned audio CDs.

AFAIK, any CD player that can read data discs and play music files will play MP3s. There may, however, be some restrictions—some possibilities I can think of are restrictions on what range of bitrates it will play, how the files are stored in folders on the disc, how long the filenames are, whether the disc has been finalized, or what kind of disc (e.g. CD-R vs CD-RW) you use. Consult the CD player's manual.

Gary Robson
02-02-2011, 10:32 PM
(a) What Thudlow Boink said.

(b) The few car stereos I've seen that play MP3 CDs won't play multi-session CDs and won't play CD-RWs. Make sure you cut a CD-R.

JoelUpchurch
02-02-2011, 11:52 PM
A friend of mine has a Nissan 350Z from a few years ago and it doesn't do MP3 files. I checked the current model and it still doesn't play MP3 files. It looks like the current 370Z model has aux input for a MP3 player.

Not being able to play MP3 files is a bit of a problem. The public library is stocking some books on CD in MP3 format.

Magiver
02-03-2011, 12:14 AM
my aftermarket unit reads MP3 and WMA files.

Darryl Lict
02-03-2011, 02:13 AM
my aftermarket unit reads MP3 and WMA files.
Same here, and my bottom of the line CD player is probably at least 5 years old.

AClockworkMelon
02-03-2011, 02:54 AM
Apologies for my ignorance. I thought that any CD I buy from a store is loaded with MP3s.

If I'm using a converter to convert MP3 files, what file type do I convert it to for it to be an "old-fashioned audio CD"?

Sorry again for these stupid questions. I've been using MP3s all my life and just took it as a given that the car would play it.

Hairy Bob
02-03-2011, 04:06 AM
An mp3 is actually a compressed version of a cd audio track, it means you can get about 10x the amount of music in the same space.
I believe most good cd burning software will do the conversion for you if you select burn an audio cd, rather than burn an mp3 cd. It's also possible that it just won't show up mp3 files to select. If that's the case, I'm not really sure, ISTR cds are recorded in PCM format, but that might not hold water.
Truth be told, I've never tried to convert an mp3 back to cd audio, and in fact, I can't remember the last time I burnt an audio cd. I'd suggest fiddling around with your software, see what it tells you is possible.
Sorry, I've been less helpful than I thought I would be.

ETA: You know that you can only get 74 minutes of audio on a cd at standard quality, right?

jz78817
02-03-2011, 04:09 AM
um, it's kind of important that you tell what CD player you have. is it a factory unit? if so, what kind of car? if it's aftermarket, what brand?

..

Magiver
02-03-2011, 04:51 AM
Apologies for my ignorance. I thought that any CD I buy from a store is loaded with MP3s.

If I'm using a converter to convert MP3 files, what file type do I convert it to for it to be an "old-fashioned audio CD"?

Sorry again for these stupid questions. I've been using MP3s all my life and just took it as a given that the car would play it. It's not a stupid question since MP3's have become such a mainstream format.

Audio CD's are not a series of individual files like an MP3 file. (explanation here) (http://www.mymusictools.com/articles/how-do-i-convert-mp3-to-cda.htm). You won't be able to look at a regular music CD and see the files using a file management program. They are more like a set of tracks with instructions encoded on where they are.

Before you reinvent the wheel and invest your time I offer a solution (http://www.amazon.com/MP3-2fWMA-Car-Modulator-Port-2fAudio-Input/dp/B0009N4OIC) that is relatively cheap and utilizes what you've already probably got.

There are a number of products like his on the market and you should research them for quality but many of them have USB ports so you can plug in a memory stick or a micro-reader like this (http://www.amazon.com/ELAGO-Mobile-Reader-World-Smallest-EL-RD-012/dp/B002K7EJDK). My car radio has a USB port so I use the reader with an (8 gb micro sdhc chip) as a hard drive.

Mangetout
02-03-2011, 05:48 AM
Audio CD's are not a series of individual files like an MP3 file. (explanation here) (http://www.mymusictools.com/articles/how-do-i-convert-mp3-to-cda.htm). You won't be able to look at a regular music CD and see the files using a file management program. They are more like a set of tracks with instructions encoded on where they are.

Just to note (not disagreeing with anything you said) that if you put an audio CD into a Windows PC, it will appear to contain a collection of .cda files. These are entirely fictional entities - generated by Windows for presentation to the system/user only.

Machine Elf
02-03-2011, 07:49 AM
A friend of mine has a Nissan 350Z from a few years ago and it doesn't do MP3 files. I checked the current model and it still doesn't play MP3 files. It looks like the current 370Z model has aux input for a MP3 player.

2002 Maxima here, the CD player does not do MP3's. I found a hack online that showed how to solder an audio input into the tape deck's circuitry, and now I'm able to listen to my iPod when the car's head unit is set to listen to the tape deck.

EinsteinsHund
02-03-2011, 08:29 AM
I believe most good cd burning software will do the conversion for you if you select burn an audio cd, rather than burn an mp3 cd.

<snip>

Truth be told, I've never tried to convert an mp3 back to cd audio, and in fact, I can't remember the last time I burnt an audio cd. I'd suggest fiddling around with your software, see what it tells you is possible.


Since Hairy Bob was a little unsure about burning audio CDs from mp3 files, I just wanted to confirm his advice. Usually, you have to choose the option/project "audio CD" in your burning software and then can add mp3 files to the project. After having chosen the files you want to burn (and note the restricted playing time of audio CDs Hairy Bob mentioned, though it's more like ca. 80 minutes with modern CD-Rs), burn the project, and the program will do the conversion and burning of the CD in one step.

Markxxx
02-03-2011, 11:07 AM
The best free converter is Foobar (http://www.foobar2000.org/)

One thing that bugs older players is the ability to read album art and tags. When you add album art and tags to an mp3 file it gets put in the file. WHERE It is written on the mp3 file makes a difference in some older players.

MP3Tag (http://www.mp3tag.de/en/) is an excellent free tagger and can tell you what tags you have on your mp3 files and if you have album art. It can also add or subtract tags off

If you put a music CD in your comptuer you see files labled CDDA. These aren't actual files but really pointers. This is why you have to "rip" a CD instead of merely copying the files.

Once you "rip" your CD you get files called WAVE files.

You take these wave files and compress them into mp3 or wma or mp4 files or various other formats, but those are the main three. Normally they take up about 10% to 15% of the original file, but you will lose some sound quality.

Most "ripping" programs do the rip and convert to compressed so fast, you think it's one step but it is more.

Then you can take these compressed files and write tags on them. A tag would be the track title, album artist, comments, album name, etc, etc. Then you can add the album art to them.

Not all programs write the tags the same way and a lot of times I found this causes issues. If I strip off all the tags, it'll play fine. Then I just rewrite the tags.

Just a note dBPowerAmp (http://www.dbpoweramp.com/) is an excellent program for "ripping," "conversion," "tag writing" etc. It is NOT free. But it is very user friendly and worth the money if you want quality but don't want to learn the more complicated programs like EAC (http://www.exactaudiocopy.de/)

suranyi
02-03-2011, 12:08 PM
An mp3 is actually a compressed version of a cd audio track, it means you can get about 10x the amount of music in the same space.
I believe most good cd burning software will do the conversion for you if you select burn an audio cd, rather than burn an mp3 cd. It's also possible that it just won't show up mp3 files to select. If that's the case, I'm not really sure, ISTR cds are recorded in PCM format, but that might not hold water.
Truth be told, I've never tried to convert an mp3 back to cd audio, and in fact, I can't remember the last time I burnt an audio cd. I'd suggest fiddling around with your software, see what it tells you is possible.
Sorry, I've been less helpful than I thought I would be.

ETA: You know that you can only get 74 minutes of audio on a cd at standard quality, right?

I know a standard CD can hold only 74 minutes of audio. How much can a CD loaded with mp3 hold?

johnpost
02-03-2011, 12:15 PM
I know a standard CD can hold only 74 minutes of audio. How much can a CD loaded with mp3 hold?

about 10 times depending on the parameters of the mp3. you could use parameters for the mp3 where the cd could contain no more minutes.

ZipperJJ
02-03-2011, 01:04 PM
Apologies for my ignorance. I thought that any CD I buy from a store is loaded with MP3s.

If I'm using a converter to convert MP3 files, what file type do I convert it to for it to be an "old-fashioned audio CD"?

Sorry again for these stupid questions. I've been using MP3s all my life and just took it as a given that the car would play it.

What media player do you use on your computer? iTunes? WinAmp? Windows Media Player?

All three of these apps have "Burn an Audio CD" capabilities built right in.

iTunes instructions (http://support.apple.com/kb/ta38263)
Windows Media Player (http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows-vista/Burn-a-CD-or-DVD-in-Windows-Media-Player)
WinAmp (http://blog.winamp.com/2009/11/04/how-to-burn-a-cd/)

If you don't use any of those music apps, you can use CD/DVD creation software if you've got it. A lot of computers come with an app bundled in. Popular apps are Nero (http://www.nero.com/enu/show-tutorial.php?tut=NzI=) and Roxio (http://www.ehow.com/how_2099925_use-roxio-music-cd.html).

Just make sure whatever app you use you specify that you want to make an AUDIO CD. Not a data CD, not an MP3 CD, not a data DVD or a backup DVD.

BURN. AUDIO. CD.

AClockworkMelon
02-03-2011, 02:52 PM
um, it's kind of important that you tell what CD player you have. is it a factory unit? if so, what kind of car? if it's aftermarket, what brand?

..
The CD player is a factory unit. The car is a 2009 Toyota Yaris. The last car I had longtime access to was a Ford Escort and it just had a tape deck (which was fine - I had one of those cassette adapter things).

Thanks for the advice guys. Right now I'm creating a disc using the "Burn Audio CD" option. I won't be able to test it with the car until later but here's hoping!

Edit: And for those who asked - I'm using Windows Media Player.

jz78817
02-03-2011, 03:47 PM
huh, I was surprised that a car that new wouldn't have a radio w/ MP3 support, but the little I've found tells me that was optional that year.

AClockworkMelon
02-03-2011, 05:21 PM
I've burnt an Audio CD and for the first time I've been able to rip music off a CD to my 360 so I'm assuming that I did something right. Still, I won't be able to check it with the car's player until later.

Thanks again for all your help guys. :)

Asimovian
02-03-2011, 06:20 PM
With all due respect to ACM, did this thread make anyone else but me feel really old?

Magiver
02-03-2011, 11:51 PM
The CD player is a factory unit. The car is a 2009 Toyota Yaris. The last car I had longtime access to was a Ford Escort and it just had a tape deck (which was fine - I had one of those cassette adapter things).

Thanks for the advice guys. Right now I'm creating a disc using the "Burn Audio CD" option. I won't be able to test it with the car until later but here's hoping!

Edit: And for those who asked - I'm using Windows Media Player.
I am greatly surprised that a 2009 CD player doesn't read mp3s.

Magiver
02-03-2011, 11:53 PM
With all due respect to ACM, did this thread make anyone else but me feel really old?
That's exactly how I felt when I read the op question. I've seen car stereo's with USB ports and no CD players.

AClockworkMelon
02-04-2011, 12:34 AM
I tested the CD in the car and it was a success.

Hairy Bob
02-04-2011, 05:24 AM
With all due respect to ACM, did this thread make anyone else but me feel really old?

I feel my joints stiffening as I type! It's understandable, but weird seeing somebody post "I've been using MP3s all my life..."
These young 'uns don't know how good they've got it, do they?

johnpost
02-04-2011, 08:32 AM
With all due respect to ACM, did this thread make anyone else but me feel really old?

I feel my joints stiffening as I type! It's understandable, but weird seeing somebody post "I've been using MP3s all my life..."
These young 'uns don't know how good they've got it, do they?

rewind is only a virtual function for them.

jz78817
02-04-2011, 08:38 AM
I am greatly surprised that a 2009 CD player doesn't read mp3s.

the Yaris is their "value leader," so the base models come with practically nothing.

Omar Little
02-04-2011, 09:09 AM
A burned audio CD disc will hold about 70 minutes of music. A burned MP3 disc will hold about 8 hours of music. Give or take.

Magiver
02-04-2011, 07:28 PM
the Yaris is their "value leader," so the base models come with practically nothing. Yes but it would be like installing a radio with a mechanical tuner. Who makes one anymore? Somebody had to specify that a normal function be left out.

jz78817
02-04-2011, 08:03 PM
Yes but it would be like installing a radio with a mechanical tuner. Who makes one anymore? Somebody had to specify that a normal function be left out.

they don't want people buying no-option base models, so they count on the upsell of $495 for the "premium audio system" which has mp3 playback.

well, at least they did, 'cos at least now on the 2011 Yaris it's standard.

ZipperJJ
02-04-2011, 08:05 PM
With all due respect to ACM, did this thread make anyone else but me feel really old?

Oh god, yes.