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View Full Version : Youtube, best possible quality?


GusNSpot
02-02-2011, 11:25 PM
What size and K count will get the best possible video on Youtube when using still shots to make a video?

Also, what is the best video frame rate, size, codex, extension video maker to get the best picture possible on Youtube shooting video with the camera?

Windows movie maker, Virtual Dub, other,
Cannon camera, Fuji camera, I do not have a digital movie cameras, just point & shoot with video capability.

320 X nnn and 29.95fs? or 640?

I can't afford special gear so what can I do with normal cameras and free movie makers to get the best results. ( no audio wanted, just picture )

Prefer to make short videos' with still shots.

Ones I have done as a sample of what I want to improve.

http://www.youtube.com/user/Dragon43#p/u/21/DavieDSEt_c

http://www.youtube.com/user/Dragon43#p/a/u/0/G0j8z5SgIdI

Thanks

GusNSpot
02-03-2011, 05:50 PM
With all the people that upload to You tube, Shirley some of them read SDMB......

I have read all the You tube info and I can't get any info that helps. But I can see video that is much better than mine.

How do they do dat? :confused:

BigT
02-04-2011, 02:45 AM
I can answer the resolution question pretty easily: if at all possible, go with 1080p: i.e. 1920x1080. Since that's just less than 2 megapixels, pretty much any modern camera can handle it. YouTube will automatically create lower resolution versions. The one version they will not make is 240p, which is what your videos use. Those will always look low quality. That's lower than old-style TV quality.

The other stuff you ask is mostly trial and error. If I were you, I'd save one copy with the highest settings you can fit on your hard drive, and then experiment with lower settings until you find one you like. The file will probably still be larger than the files you were using, but that's okay. As long as it's less than 2 GB, YouTube can handle it, and will do its own conversion. It just may take a little while to upload.

I can suggest you stick with common, everyday codecs, like MPEG4 or DivX. And remember that you can add music after the upload.

There is one other thing I can tell you: try downloading a high quality video using a YouTube downloader (Google is your friend). Then use the VLC media player (http://www.videolan.org/vlc/) to open it and look at the codec settings. I'm sorry I'm not much more help.

GusNSpot
02-04-2011, 09:07 AM
Thanks, a lot more information than I had before. I'll play around with that,


Thanks again. :cool:

Kinthalis
02-04-2011, 09:32 AM
Youtube's limit is what? 1080p, 15 minutes and 2 gigs?

That should allow you to deliver a fairly pristine 1080p 15 minute video. I would encode to h.264 at a constant quality of 18 or 20 (see what fits within the under 2 gig limit).

You said it was mostly still shots, correct? Then I doubt you will pass a few hundred MB even at full 1080p and at an 18 CQ setting.

I use ripbot (free) and TMpegXpress ($99) (now called Video Mastering Works 5 http://tmpgenc.pegasys-inc.com/en/product/tvmw5.html) to do all my Hd h.264/mkv encoding.

If you end up getting Mastering Works, I'll be happy to take you through the app and settings to get the best you-tube video possible.

GusNSpot
02-05-2011, 12:04 AM
I'll look at that, Thanks for the info.

GuanoLad
02-05-2011, 12:32 AM
In order to avoid recompression, if you upload a flash .flv file that you rendered yourself, it should remain as is. That's the theory, anyway.

BigT
02-05-2011, 05:42 AM
Youtube's limit is what? 1080p, 15 minutes and 2 gigs?

That should allow you to deliver a fairly pristine 1080p 15 minute video. I would encode to h.264 at a constant quality of 18 or 20 (see what fits within the under 2 gig limit).


YouTube does have an experimental Java plugin that will allow file sizes greater than 2 GB. I forgot about that, as I've never used it. Heck, I've only ever uploaded three videos, and I wasn't too concerned about quality.