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Pyper
03-22-2011, 09:10 PM
Long version: I work out of my car, seeing clients in-home. I try to eat fairly healthy snacks (granola bars, fruit, string cheese), but I always end up starving between lunch and dinner. Sometimes I want to just stuff my face with a donut so I can be contently not-starving before dinner. So I need Doper suggestions for snacks.

Qualifications:
Portable
Doesn't need to be heated
Really filling, but hopefully nutritious
Not nuts (I don't like nuts) (Or beef jerky)

StuffLikeThatThere
03-22-2011, 09:48 PM
How do you feel about hard-boiled eggs? I stick one in a sandwich baggie with some salt in the bottom, and then when I peel the egg, I dip it in the salt in the baggie. I find it very filling, and it's protein, so I don't crash half an hour later.

Markxxx
03-22-2011, 09:58 PM
Carrots, celery, the egg is a good idea too

Alice The Goon
03-22-2011, 10:01 PM
Apples, bananas, carrots, celery?

JThunder
03-22-2011, 10:01 PM
You don't like beef jerky? Would you consider turkey jerky?

Jennmonkye
03-22-2011, 10:01 PM
I make bento boxes for myself as I am in the same situation as you (not working near a kitchen or lunchroom). Typically I thrown in things like cheese squares, pepperoni, broccoli, carrot chips, eggs, sliced grilled bratwurst, turkey meatballs, or chicken breast strips (if you can keep it in a thermal bag with an ice pack), hummus, sliced peppers, pickles...oh yeah...BACON...I tend to avoid carbs (although I love wasabi peas) with my lunches and snacks to stay away from the afternoon crash that I experience. Good luck finding snacky items!

Flutterby
03-22-2011, 10:14 PM
I like hummus and triscuits or pita chips/bread myself.

Athena
03-22-2011, 10:15 PM
My first thought was hard-boiled eggs, but StuffLikeThatThere beat me to it.

Like Jennmonkye, I tend to avoid carbs. I find that eating fat/protein fills me up way better than carbs do, so maybe that will work for you as well.

Yogurt, in the small containers. Get the full-fat stuff, not the low-fat, it'll fill you up more and it's not overly caloric at all, and packs in some good protein as well.

Lunch meat - ham/turkey/whatever, and cheese. Put it on a tortilla and roll it up.

Veggies are good, tasty, and low-cal, but they don't really fill me up. Still, they're fun to eat so throw some of those in the bag.

Tuna or sardines, though this might not work well if you're meeting with clients right afterwards.

Bananas with peanut butter smeared on them. I guess if you're in the car, just a small container of PB and a spoon.

Pyper
03-22-2011, 10:32 PM
Thanks for the suggestions so far. I'll definitely try the eggs, full-fat yogurt, and lunch meats ideas. Unfortunately, fruits and vegetables don't work for me as a snack because they have no staying power in my stomach.

Johnny L.A.
03-22-2011, 11:01 PM
I usually have gruel on my morning commute: 1/2 cup instant oatmeal, 1/4 cup of sugar-free maple syrup, and two cups of water. Microwave for three minutes. I get fuel, get on the freeway, and usually end up drinking it about 45 minutes after taking it out of the oven. Not helpful for between lunch and dinner, though.

How about a peanut butter-and-banana sandwich? The peanut butter makes it filling, and the bananas give you potassium and something sweet.

Superhal
03-23-2011, 12:56 AM
Hmm. Need some additional information:

1. Do you eat a big lunch?

2. Why would the doughnut fill you up when other snacks wouldn't?

3. When you get hungry after lunch, does your hand shake?

OldnCrinkly
03-23-2011, 01:11 AM
My favorite snacks to pack are celery with peanut butter, dates with cream cheese, and vanilla yogurt with granola type cereal. If you are eating it late in the day you can always freeze the yogurt. It will thaw in time and its much less sloppy than milk for cereal.

pricciar
03-23-2011, 01:35 AM
How about pretzels? I guess they aren't especially healthy, but, I don't consider them especially unhealthy, either. They keep forever, they are delicious, and I think just a couple of them will fill you up. Especially, those thick sourdough pretzels.

devilsknew
03-23-2011, 01:40 AM
Snyder's of Hanover Honey Mustard and Onion Pretzel Pieces and a jar of cheese, can be a queso dip, or a flask of limburger. Eat with a Root Beer or Ginger Ale.

Sehmket
03-23-2011, 08:47 AM
What is it you don't like about jerky?

When I started low-carb dieting last year, I started making my own jerky, and it's pretty amazing how much you can manipulate the flavors and textures.

I bring it up because it's really great as a snack - it keeps in pretty much all conditions, it's easy to eat (as long as you slice your strips across the grain - depending exactly on what you do, you can end up with a texture that's almost crumbly, which makes it really easy to eat), and it's tasty.

wonky
03-23-2011, 10:16 AM
Lunch meat spread with cream cheese and (optional) horseradish then rolled up and (optional) sliced into pinwheels. You can put a leaf lettuce of some sort in there too.

I do the same thing with lunch meat and sliced cheese.

Celery with peanut butter or cream cheese.

SecretaryofEvil
03-23-2011, 10:20 AM
You need a healthy, filling, portable snack? You might as well say "I need a unicorn."



Kidding of course. There are some nice suggestions in this thread.

Philster
03-23-2011, 10:33 AM
I go with certain bars, such as Pure Protein or the Atkins Bar. They are rated low numerically on the Glycemic Index, which means they tame huger longer, satiate with protein and are fortified... tasty... and darn easy to carry.

You are also less likely to crave junk for dinner with the right snack choice.

.

tarragon918
03-23-2011, 10:45 AM
Don't laugh, but I personally like a wedge of the Laughing Cow cheeses and some crackers. Get a package of wet wipes, the recloseable kind, to clean up with after. The Laughing Cow cheese are semi-soft, come in many flavors (swiss, french onion), you can get the "light" version which are only 35 calories/wedge, and with a small package of crackers boy they are tasty. :) Or you could buy cheese and crackers or peanut butter crackers, already made up in the package. LOL I just love those laughing cow wedges with either Ritz crackers or the Keebler club crackers. You could use triskets or wheat thins, or any other kind of cracker, really. Just thought of something else - you can eat the cheese with fruit! I'd go with pear or apple. :)

I second the full-fat yogurts. They're really not much more, calorie-wise. I like the little cottage cheese doublers that Breakstone makes. They do contain about 300 mg. sodium each, though--might be more than people want to have if you've got high blood pressure.

Moonlitherial
03-23-2011, 10:58 AM
I've started bringing strips of grilled chicken and vegetables to work for a snack. I grill boneless chicken breasts and cut into strips. Cut strips of cheese, red or green peppers or cucumber to go with it. I prefer it over lunch meat.

Huerta88
03-23-2011, 11:04 AM
Don't laugh, but I personally like a wedge of the Laughing Cow cheeses and some crackers. Get a package of wet wipes, the recloseable kind, to clean up with after. The Laughing Cow cheese are semi-soft, come in many flavors (swiss, french onion), you can get the "light" version which are only 35 calories/wedge, and with a small package of crackers boy they are tasty. :)
I won't laugh at you though some would say the processed cheez aspect of the LC makes it both messier and less . . . wholesome? I've eaten plenty, but would side with those who favor Babybel -- comes in its own container, not smeary, and "real" cheese. Tasty too.

Mean Mr. Mustard
03-23-2011, 11:04 AM
What keeps me going many afternoons is a 12-oz. can of V8 juice. Buy it by the case at Costco.


mmm

ZipperJJ
03-23-2011, 11:29 AM
I stood and studied all of the granola bars at my grocery store, and all of them were pretty sad when it came to protein (too little. Like 2-3g!) and fiber (also too little). But the South Beach Living High Protein Cereal Bars (yes as in South Beach Diet) won out with 10g of protein. TEN!!! They happen to be quite delicious too.

I usually pick up a box when I go to the store, and use them as a way to fill my tummy up at night when I need to take my gut-wrenching meds with food.

Here's a nutritional label (http://caloriecount.about.com/calories-south-beach-high-protein-cereal-i101114) from the box, allegedly. I consider all other granola bars and snack bars to be a waste of time now.

Huerta88
03-23-2011, 11:34 AM
Not nuts (I don't like nuts) (Or beef jerky)
You realize how uncool that was? Degree of difficulty is nice and all, but . . . .

No nuts?

Sunflower seeds?

Huerta88
03-23-2011, 11:52 AM
(Or beef jerky)

Does this ban include a ban on honest-to-goodness real dry sausages?

http://www.cattaneobros.com/products/hot-smoked-beef-sticks/
http://www.polana.com/product/42/Polish_Sausages

Okay, or how about a shooter's sandwich? You could make a couple of these up at the beginning of the week, slice into small wedges, which should be portable, and delicious cold or cool, as well as filling.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/gallery/2010/apr/07/how-to-make-shooters-sandwich#/?picture=360719902&index=10

TruCelt
03-23-2011, 11:55 AM
Do you have access to hot water? The instant soups (especially Amy's brand) are really good. Some are higher carb but most are whole grain and legumes so higher in protein than you'd think.

For tons of ideas google "Bento box" and/or "Shelf stable meals"

Motorgirl
03-23-2011, 11:59 AM
Thanks for the suggestions so far. I'll definitely try the eggs, full-fat yogurt, and lunch meats ideas. Unfortunately, fruits and vegetables don't work for me as a snack because they have no staying power in my stomach.

I'm definitely with you on fruits and vegetables not having staying power - if you eat them on their own. I find that a combination of carrots and peanut butter, or carrots and hummus, or apples and peanut butter, are much more effective at staving off hunger than any of those things alone or with crackers. YMMV

Huerta88
03-23-2011, 12:07 PM
I try to eat fairly healthy snacks (granola bars
I'm really not trying to eviscerate every clause of your OP -- it just seems that way . . . .

I am surprised though that it's gone this far without someone jumping on this. For all I know you have access to some spiffy truly-nutritious whole-grain high-fiber low carb granola bar, but the more likely granola bar that you or I will find has been frequently derided as the epitome of unhealthy "health food" for all the sugar, processed gunk, etc. they typically contain. Hint -- three year olds willingly eat them . . . .

FeAudrey
03-23-2011, 01:00 PM
... Qualifications ... Doesn't need to be heated ...

How about a wide-mouth thermos full of stuff you heated before leaving home? In a thermal lunch bag. Works for "needs refrigeration" items, as well.

Fat is digested more slowly than protein or carbohydrates, so, for staying power, your snacks should have a little fat in them.

Huerta88
03-23-2011, 01:18 PM
Okay, keeping with my cold meat sandwich theme I give you the sichuan bacon mayo bap (I just sort of invented that but I will make it within the week for lunch/snacks):

http://networkedblogs.com/fLGcg

expectopatronum
03-23-2011, 01:25 PM
I'm definitely with you on fruits and vegetables not having staying power - if you eat them on their own. I find that a combination of carrots and peanut butter, or carrots and hummus, or apples and peanut butter, are much more effective at staving off hunger than any of those things alone or with crackers. YMMV

totally agree. apples and peanut butter is one of my favorite snacks.

rucciface
03-23-2011, 01:31 PM
How about high-fiber cereal like Mini Wheats or something similar? No prep necessary, and if you get the frosted kind they're tastier than a doughnut (IMO).

ZipperJJ
03-23-2011, 01:47 PM
I'm really not trying to eviscerate every clause of your OP -- it just seems that way . . . .

I am surprised though that it's gone this far without someone jumping on this. For all I know you have access to some spiffy truly-nutritious whole-grain high-fiber low carb granola bar, but the more likely granola bar that you or I will find has been frequently derided as the epitome of unhealthy "health food" for all the sugar, processed gunk, etc. they typically contain. Hint -- three year olds willingly eat them . . . .

Well, I did point the OP towards the only item in the granola bar section of the grocery store that does have a useful amount of protein, and noted that all other bars are crap.

lindsaybluth
03-23-2011, 01:53 PM
I know you mentioned granola bars, but I'll do you one better: Lara bars (http://www.larabar.com/products/cherry-pie). There is nothing not "real" in them. The "apple pie" one has dates, almonds, apples, walnuts cinnamon and raisin. That's it. No added sugar, no weird stabilizers.

I know you said you don't like nuts, but these barely taste of nuts. My personal favorite is the cherry pie one, which is dates, almonds and unsweetened cherries. The chocolate coconut chew is unsweetened coconut, unsweetened cocoa powder, walnuts, almonds and dates. Try one out, you'll really like them. And they do have "staying" power.

I also recommend these packaged Whole Grain Crackers (http://www.lance.com/products/sandwich-crackers/sharp-cheddar-whole-grain). You have a choice of extra sharp cheddar, regular cheddar, and peanut butter. You have to find these in well-stocked grocery stores in upper middle class areas and above. I can't find them at certain grocery stores in the Pittsburgh suburbs if it's just a middle class 'burb. On sale they're about $2 for a pack of 6 or 8, so they're a good deal.

Full fat Laughing Cow cheese is a million times more satisfying than any other packaged portable cheese I've ever found.
ETA: I meant Babybel, not Laughing Cow. My bad!

I'd also recommend a little of this in a Pyrex container. It should be served cold: Quinoa, mango and blackbean salad (http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/quinoa_mango_black_bean_salad.html). This stuff is great - ultra light but extremely filling. Warning: whisk the liquids searately and drizzle on dish to your liking. If you've got a super ripe mango chances are good you don't need much of the liquid mixture.

Huerta88
03-23-2011, 01:54 PM
Well, I did point the OP towards the only item in the granola bar section of the grocery store that does have a useful amount of protein, and noted that all other bars are crap.Ah, so, that you did. I do have a bit of a modest see-red moment for Quaker candy er health bars -- right up there with the legions of svelte American goddesses that stalked the land within weeks after the release of Snackwells "diet" dessert treats . . . .

tarragon918
03-23-2011, 03:07 PM
I won't laugh at you though some would say the processed cheez aspect of the LC makes it both messier and less . . . wholesome? I've eaten plenty, but would side with those who favor Babybel -- comes in its own container, not smeary, and "real" cheese. Tasty too.

Thanks for the tip! I'll try those babybels; I think I've seen them. Yes, the LCs are messy, but I do find them tasty. Probably have other stuff I shouldn't be eating in them, though. :( Real cheese would be healthier. Thanks!

Huerta88
03-23-2011, 03:30 PM
, the LCs are messy, but I do find them tasty. Probably have other stuff I shouldn't be eating in them, though. :( Real cheese would be healthier. Thanks!
Eh as it turns out . . . not necessarily, the processing does seem more about the texture and the integration of the flavors (the only weird other stuff added seems to be fairly benign preserving/stabilizing stuff). Fact is part of the texturizing likely involves whipping it, thus introducing air, thus meaning fewer calories (but also less protein) per piece vis a vis Babybel -- if this helps you with portion control mentally, probably not a horrible thing.

Source: http://www.thelaughingcow.com/products/light-garlic-original/

(citing the flavor I like best).

Pyper
03-23-2011, 03:44 PM
I agree with most everyone that my problem is too much carbs/sugars and not enough fat. In fact, that's probably a problem with my diet in general- I'm just not attracted to fatty foods but then I end up hungry all the time. You all have given me some great suggestions for filling food that sounds appetizing.

Pyper
03-23-2011, 03:47 PM
Also, stop trying to get me to eat nuts and jerky! :p I don't like jerky because it's tough and salty (although I've had homemade jerky that was good). I do like cured meats and summer sausage, though, so I will try that in my snack rotation.

nivlac
03-23-2011, 04:59 PM
Nothing beats a banana. It comes pre-wrapped!

purplehorseshoe
03-24-2011, 12:56 PM
Couscous or quinoa keep pretty well - chilled straight outta the fridge early in the day, either one will still be fine a few hours later. Mix with chopped grilled veggies or other yummy things to make a salad. (Quinoa is pretty high in protein for being a "grain" so that helps with satiety, too.)

Aeris
03-24-2011, 01:58 PM
I vote for edamame. Just heat it up the night before in the microwave, sprinkle with a little salt, throw it in a ziploc bag and it's ready for the next day. Lots of protein.

Rachellelogram
03-24-2011, 02:11 PM
I'm really not trying to eviscerate every clause of your OP -- it just seems that way . . . .

I am surprised though that it's gone this far without someone jumping on this. For all I know you have access to some spiffy truly-nutritious whole-grain high-fiber low carb granola bar, but the more likely granola bar that you or I will find has been frequently derided as the epitome of unhealthy "health food" for all the sugar, processed gunk, etc. they typically contain. Hint -- three year olds willingly eat them . . . .
I willingly ate spinach from the moment I was able to process real foods. Whether a 3 year old will or won't eat it is not sufficient evidence for a food's nutritional content. (Not that you don't have a point, but you made it, at least in part, fallaciously)

typoink
03-24-2011, 06:03 PM
Not to be glib, but try water. Obviously, it's not a snack food, but my personal experience is that upping your water intake by a liter or two in the day drastically reduces between meal munchies.

Also, you mentioned that you don't like nuts, but I would seriously recommend giving toasted walnuts a try if you never had.

If you're craving a donut, you're craving sugar and white flour. Sadly, you're not going to find anything truly healthy that's going to hit that nail right on the head. You could try a portion control approach -- buy a donut, eat half, and toss the other half (or cut 'em in half at home ad only take one half). If you leave the other half in reach, you'll likely eat it

ZipperJJ
03-24-2011, 07:38 PM
If I worked out of my car, I would not be drinking extra water.

Pyper
03-24-2011, 09:09 PM
Not to be glib, but try water. Obviously, it's not a snack food, but my personal experience is that upping your water intake by a liter or two in the day drastically reduces between meal munchies.

Also, you mentioned that you don't like nuts, but I would seriously recommend giving toasted walnuts a try if you never had.

If you're craving a donut, you're craving sugar and white flour. Sadly, you're not going to find anything truly healthy that's going to hit that nail right on the head. You could try a portion control approach -- buy a donut, eat half, and toss the other half (or cut 'em in half at home ad only take one half). If you leave the other half in reach, you'll likely eat it

I don't have the munchies, I'm hungry. I don't crave a donut specifically, I crave something that will not make me hungry any more. I'm underweight, not overweight. I think I need the opposite of portion control-- I need to eat more, but I want to do it in a nutritious way.

So I tried StuffLikeThatThere's idea today since I happened to have hard-boiled eggs on hand. The problem is, I'm an egg-peeling retarded person. Next time, I'm peeling the thing at home so I won't make such a mess. Unfortunately, my last client of the day stuffed me with some pizza, so I didn't get to see if the egg filled me up until my normal dinner time.

Huerta88
03-24-2011, 09:24 PM
Next time, I'm peeling the thing at home so I won't make such a mess. Unfortunately, my last client of the day stuffed me with some pizza, so I didn't get to see if the egg filled me up until my normal dinner time.
Yeah, peel them under the faucet, which is easier and gets rid of stray shell bits. And if one doesn't fill you -- bring two or three. A single jumbo egg has 90 cals. and 8 g. protein -- a nice nutritious but fairly tiny snack. Large or medium eggs are even smaller bits of energy.

Zsofia
03-24-2011, 11:54 PM
They have pre-peeled, pre-boiled eggs at the grocery store. Which is a godsend for those of us who have some kind of weird problem boiling eggs.

devilsknew
03-25-2011, 12:07 AM
They have pre-peeled, pre-boiled eggs at the grocery store. Which is a godsend for those of us who have some kind of weird problem boiling eggs.

Or, you know, you could buy a big Jar of Red Beet Pickled Eggs, a few bags of Honey Mustard and Onion Pretzels, a flask of Limburger, and some Firecracker Pickled sausages and put them in the trunk witha case of Vernors and pray you never get rearended. Might not be the best for a hot climate.

purplehorseshoe
03-25-2011, 10:12 AM
Obligatory hinty: eggs that have been sitting in your fridge a week or two (in addition to however long they sit in storage and at the grocery store) are easier to peel than freshly-bought eggs. As they age, the little air pocket gets bigger and the membrane separates a bit.

Freshly-laid eggs are im-fucking-possible to peel. They come out looking like aliens.

Superhal
03-25-2011, 11:50 PM
Sorry, the OP didn't answer my questions. I had the same experience, and depending on the answers to my questions, the answer to the OP's questions are different.

Zsofia
03-26-2011, 08:15 AM
Or, you know, you could buy a big Jar of Red Beet Pickled Eggs, a few bags of Honey Mustard and Onion Pretzels, a flask of Limburger, and some Firecracker Pickled sausages and put them in the trunk witha case of Vernors and pray you never get rearended. Might not be the best for a hot climate.
Or if you have to interact with any human beings. Like, ever. Or if your car windows don't roll down and you like to breathe oxygen.

anu-la1979
03-26-2011, 08:35 AM
Edamame: I buy the kind in the pod, boil in lightly salted water and shell the night before. It's a little bit more work but I don't like the pre-shelled kind at all. So so good-I buy mine at Trader Joe's.

Boiled egg is a good one, but I'm not a fan since I don't like yolk.

Yogurt or Kefir/Drinkable yogurt: I recommend learning how to eat it plain with just fresh fruit. There is nothing tastier than than plain greek yogurt (I eat 0% but 2% is even tastier) mixed with good quality squashed strawberries. I just wish Fage sold in smaller quantities but I think the Trader Joe's house brand and Oikos are sold in smaller amounts. I weaned myself off premixed yogurts in 2007 and I can't imagine going back-just the taste of artificial sweetners makes me retch.

Same for kefir. My regular breakfast is unsweetned plain kefir mixed in the blender with 3 strawberries. I'm teaching myself how to drink the plain kefir they package in portable quantities-when I was at my thinnest in 2005 I was regularly drinking plain lowfat buttermilk and I think it's kind of the same.

A glass of lowfat milk. It has protein.

Small salad with a tablespoon of balsamic vinaigrette.

Whole wheat toast with a tablespoon of non-sugared peanut/cashew/almond butter.

Pyper
03-26-2011, 11:55 AM
Edamame: I buy the kind in the pod, boil in lightly salted water and shell the night before. It's a little bit more work but I don't like the pre-shelled kind at all. So so good-I buy mine at Trader Joe's.

Boiled egg is a good one, but I'm not a fan since I don't like yolk.

Yogurt or Kefir/Drinkable yogurt: I recommend learning how to eat it plain with just fresh fruit. There is nothing tastier than than plain greek yogurt (I eat 0% but 2% is even tastier) mixed with good quality squashed strawberries. I just wish Fage sold in smaller quantities but I think the Trader Joe's house brand and Oikos are sold in smaller amounts. I weaned myself off premixed yogurts in 2007 and I can't imagine going back-just the taste of artificial sweetners makes me retch.

Same for kefir. My regular breakfast is unsweetned plain kefir mixed in the blender with 3 strawberries. I'm teaching myself how to drink the plain kefir they package in portable quantities-when I was at my thinnest in 2005 I was regularly drinking plain lowfat buttermilk and I think it's kind of the same.

A glass of lowfat milk. It has protein.

Small salad with a tablespoon of balsamic vinaigrette.

Whole wheat toast with a tablespoon of non-sugared peanut/cashew/almond butter.

Ah, yes, kefir. I love kefir with mango chunks in it.

lindsaybluth
03-27-2011, 10:33 AM
Do you have access to hot water? The instant soups (especially Amy's brand) are really good. Some are higher carb but most are whole grain and legumes so higher in protein than you'd think.

For tons of ideas google "Bento box" and/or "Shelf stable meals"

TruCelt, where do you find these instant soups from Amy's? Are they in regular stores or in Whole Foods? Near the other canned soups? I assume you mean they're in packets like Cup-a-soup. I love most of Amy's canned soups (except the Tom Kha Phak - I wouldn't serve that to an axe murderer).

vivalostwages
03-27-2011, 01:00 PM
If you can carry a little cooler with you, hummus is good, especially if it is the olive or garlic or red pepper kind. Dunk some pretzels or cheese sticks into it for extra carbs and protein.

Batsinma Belfry
03-27-2011, 03:14 PM
I hate nuts too, but have recently discovered blanched almonds aka naked almonds. They're soft and have a non-nutty taste. I mix them with dried cherries and dark chocolate morsels.

Spice Weasel
03-27-2011, 04:15 PM
I stood and studied all of the granola bars at my grocery store, and all of them were pretty sad when it came to protein (too little. Like 2-3g!) and fiber (also too little). But the South Beach Living High Protein Cereal Bars (yes as in South Beach Diet) won out with 10g of protein. TEN!!! They happen to be quite delicious too.

My personal ''can't do without'' snack is the Cliff Builder Bar. 20g of protein, Low Glycemic, 270 calories (sometimes I just eat half.) The best ones are Lemon IMO.

Amasia
03-27-2011, 04:30 PM
A frittata can be a great choice- filling, pizzaish, healthy and easy to make ahead of time and carry around with you. The NY Times has published a bunch of frittata recipes in the last few days- my fave is most similar to this one: http://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/25/health/nutrition/25recipehealth.html?ref=recipesforhealth

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