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View Full Version : Trendy Foods That Make You Ask "Why"?


ralph124c
05-12-2011, 07:34 PM
I don't understand a lot of the hype for:
-fresh buffalo mozzarella cheese...little balls of tasteless putty
-exotic coffees (don't mention kopi liwok)
-quinoa (tastes like little beads of styrofoam)
-"free range chicken"-usually tough
-miniature vegetables (no flavor)
I also don't understand why the practice of monding your food-why put the steal on top of tyhe mashed potatoes? I prefer stuff arranged where I can see everything at once.

kittenblue
05-12-2011, 10:22 PM
I also don't understand why the practice of monding your food-why put the steal on top of tyhe mashed potatoes? I prefer stuff arranged where I can see everything at once.

Huh? Mounding I can figure out, but steal?

Ponch8
05-12-2011, 10:34 PM
Sandwich wraps--tortilla dishes are meant to be served hot and as Mexican food.
Aioli--what the hell is this, anyway?
Chipotle peppers/mayonnaise/etc.--I like spicy stuff, but not the smoky flavor.

Lamar Mundane
05-12-2011, 10:35 PM
Huh? Mounding I can figure out, but steal?

Steak.

Ladymarmalade
05-12-2011, 10:37 PM
"Chipotle" drives me nuts. It's a stupid word for a stupid jalapeno pepper, nothing to hype up.

Not crazy about "in" drinks. Cosmo, mojito, bimbo juice!

That is all. :mad:

RickJay
05-12-2011, 10:39 PM
"Fusion" stuff, especially when it's really not much of a stretch, like Vietnamese/Thai.

Fuck fusion. If I want Thai, I want Thai.

If you're going to do fusion, have the balls to fuse something INTERESTING. I want to see Helmut Nguyen's House of Bavarian-Vietnamese Fusion Cuisine, or The Norwexican (Herring tacos FTW.)

Athena
05-12-2011, 10:44 PM
"Chipotle" drives me nuts. It's a stupid word for a stupid jalapeno pepper, nothing to hype up.


No, it's not. A chipotle is a dried, smoked jalapeno. It tastes significantly different than a jalepeno. If you're getting jalepenos, and they're calling them chipotles, then you have something to complain about, but it's not just another word for jalapeno.

Ladymarmalade
05-12-2011, 10:47 PM
No, it's not. A chipotle is a dried, smoked jalapeno. It tastes significantly different than a jalepeno. If you're getting jalepenos, and they're calling them chipotles, then you have something to complain about, but it's not just another word for jalapeno.

Like I said, it is a jalapeno. The rest of your post I did not mention. By the way it is jal-a-peno. Thank you for the corrections.

Athena
05-12-2011, 10:59 PM
Like I said, it is a jalapeno. The rest of your post I did not mention. By the way it is jal-a-peno. Thank you for the corrections.

By this logic, applesauce is the same as apples, pork belly is the same as bacon, and all eggs are omelets.

You're right on the spelling, though. I'm typing on an ipad and it's a hassle.

drastic_quench
05-12-2011, 11:04 PM
Like I said, it is a jalapeno. The rest of your post I did not mention. By the way it is jal-a-peno. Thank you for the corrections.

Would you like some grapes? How about some raisins? Oh, wait they're exactly the same thing.

Ladymarmalade
05-12-2011, 11:08 PM
Anyway OP, also pomegranate or acai this-and-that. Not that I mind them, it's just the hype that annoys me, everybody doing it at once as if it's some great new thing that has swept the world when really, not so much.

alphaboi867
05-12-2011, 11:50 PM
...If you're going to do fusion, have the balls to fuse something INTERESTING. I want to see Helmut Nguyen's House of Bavarian-Vietnamese Fusion Cuisine, or The Norwexican (Herring tacos FTW.)

Both Norway (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vietnamese_Norwegians) and Germany (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vietnamese_people_in_Germany) do have sizable Vietnamese communities. I'm sure there have been many attempts at fusing those cuisines.

Patty O'Furniture
05-12-2011, 11:56 PM
Crudités :D

obfusciatrist
05-13-2011, 12:05 AM
If you're going to do fusion, have the balls to fuse something INTERESTING. I want to see Helmut Nguyen's House of Bavarian-Vietnamese Fusion Cuisine, or The Norwexican (Herring tacos FTW.)

There's a TexMex-Thai place near me at work. Does that suffice? Curry burritos.

"Marble top" ice cream places where they mix in the ingredients. I'm fine with the idea but almost all of them use awful ice cream as the base so I don't understand why the big chains are popular.

astro
05-13-2011, 12:07 AM
Bubble tea. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bubble_tea) Looks scary and hideous.

MPB in Salt Lake
05-13-2011, 12:32 AM
What I don't get is why every major fast-food chain seems contractually obligated to bandwagon all the food trends (including several mentioned above) a full 4 or 5 years after they have peaked, in a pathetic attempt of cashing in on a fad that has already long since crested.

McDonalds for a panini?

Angus beef at Burger King?

Chipotle essence at Taco Bell?

(and yes, I actually do get what they are doing, but it still doesn't explain why they are always SO late to the party)

Swords to Plowshares
05-13-2011, 01:01 AM
Aioli--what the hell is this, anyway?


The Spanish would like to have a few words with you.

I don't know whether you wanted your question answered, but a traditional aioli is garlic, olive oil, and egg.

obfusciatrist
05-13-2011, 01:34 AM
Oh, food trucks.

While I've had good food from trucks there seems to be a sudden acceptance that food served from a truck is somehow automatically superior. There's one food truck near me that has people waiting 20 minutes in line to eat a food that isn't really meant to be eaten while standing that is actually more expensive than and only as good as the same item available from five different restaurants within a half dozen blocks.

Bosstone
05-13-2011, 01:51 AM
Bubble tea. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bubble_tea) Looks scary and hideous.I've tried it. It is.

pulykamell
05-13-2011, 02:11 AM
I'm a bit hesitant to admit this, but I just don't get the whole "crazy about sous vide" thing. I mean, it's fine, I guess, and a good tool to have in a chef's arsenal, but the handful of times I had something cooked sous vide, I actually preferred the more traditional prep.

Also, I've said this before, but bacon. The whole bacon trend annoys the ever living shit out of me, for some reason. Yes, bacon is delicious. (Hell, I make my own from time to time.) But, goddamit, it doesn't need to be on everything and it easily overpowers food with its agressive flavor. Luckily, I think the bacon craze peaked about two years ago and is on the decline.

Farmer Jane
05-13-2011, 02:50 AM
I can't stop chuckling over the price of arugula.

etv78
05-13-2011, 03:04 AM
Crudités :D

DUDETTE!!! That's just WRONG!

flodnak
05-13-2011, 03:11 AM
I don't know whether you wanted your question answered, but a traditional aioli is garlic, olive oil, and egg.And it seems to often be used to mean mayo with garlic - which, if it's good mayo with garlic, isn't too far off the garlic-olive oil-egg combination - just with a bit of acid added (lemon juice or vinegar).

I like 'em both.

Johnny Q
05-13-2011, 03:23 AM
"Fusion" stuff, especially when it's really not much of a stretch, like Vietnamese/Thai.

Fuck fusion. If I want Thai, I want Thai.

If you're going to do fusion, have the balls to fuse something INTERESTING. I want to see Helmut Nguyen's House of Bavarian-Vietnamese Fusion Cuisine, or The Norwexican (Herring tacos FTW.)

Pho Shizzle: Vietnamese Soul Food

Double Foolscap
05-13-2011, 04:22 AM
I like the minature vegetables - if they're cooked right. Same as regular vegetables, I guess.

I don't like how fancy sandwiches have lemon mayonnaise in them, as it always seems too sharp, and overpowers the salmon or tuna or whatever. Beyond that, I can't think of anything as most trendy stuff goes right under my radar - I hate it when almost every packaged sandwich has tomato slices, but I don't think tomatoes count as trendy.

EvilTOJ
05-13-2011, 06:34 AM
Lemon mayonnaise? Oh god that sounds so disgusting!

Novelty Bobble
05-13-2011, 06:50 AM
"Fusion" stuff, especially when it's really not much of a stretch, like Vietnamese/Thai.

Fuck fusion. If I want Thai, I want Thai.

If you're going to do fusion, have the balls to fuse something INTERESTING. I want to see Helmut Nguyen's House of Bavarian-Vietnamese Fusion Cuisine, or The Norwexican (Herring tacos FTW.)

Ask and you shall receive. I give you Wahaca (http://www.wahaca.co.uk/html/3_marketfood.html) in London.
I often have the herring tacos. Marinated and served with olives and tomato if my memory serves me correctly....yum!

Lynn Bodoni
05-13-2011, 07:07 AM
I don't like the idea of putting one ingredient in most dishes. The ingredient will vary. For instance, I LIKE cilantro...in small doses. But it doesn't need to be in every single savory dish on the menu. And ditto the big chains' jumping on the bandwagon when it's already gone by. For a while there, it seemed like the only main-course salad that anyone offered was a chicken Caesar salad...which most chains seemed to think consisted of chicken on Romaine lettuce with a nasty dressing.

Double Foolscap
05-13-2011, 07:13 AM
Lemon mayonnaise? Oh god that sounds so disgusting!

I made the mistake of picking up a jar to make a blue cheese dressing. My reasoning was that the recipe called for lemons and mayonnaise, so I was being efficient.

It tasted... not bad, and it seemed to go down OK with the people who ate it, but to me it tasted like I'd spilled some oven cleaner into the bowl.

We threw the rest of the jar out.

bouv
05-13-2011, 07:16 AM
Lemon mayonnaise? Oh god that sounds so disgusting!

Really? Mayonnaise has acid already in it in some form (usually vinegar, but often there's lemon juice too) so why would ramping up the lemon seem so bad?

Smapti
05-13-2011, 07:22 AM
Ask and you shall receive. I give you Wahaca (http://www.wahaca.co.uk/html/3_marketfood.html) in London.
I often have the herring tacos. Marinated and served with olives and tomato if my memory serves me correctly....yum!

As a native of San Diego who has been enjoying delicious Mexican food all my life, I have but one thing to say;

This menu is absolutely fascinating. I'd love to try it at least once in my life.

Novelty Bobble
05-13-2011, 07:49 AM
As a native of San Diego who has been enjoying delicious Mexican food all my life, I have but one thing to say;

This menu is absolutely fascinating. I'd love to try it at least once in my life.

It gets very good reviews. particularly as it is good value for money in a notoriously expensive city. It may be that your USA portion radar needs recalibrating before you try it though. (Though I've never had cause to complain)

The lady who's idea it was certainly cares about authenticity and though I've never eaten Oaxacan in the wild, those that have say she makes a good stab at it.

Gyrate
05-13-2011, 07:59 AM
Sadly, I rather like a lot of the items mentioned in this thread, including almost everything in the OP (except the coffee, which I don't drink). If your chicken is tough and your mini veggies tasteless, they're being cooked wrong. Sliced buffalo mozzarella with slices of tomato and basil leaves, drizzled in olive oil and black pepper is lovely. And quinoa is no worse than rice or couscous.

If you want full-on fusion, just wait until this guy (http://www.guardian.co.uk/tv-and-radio/2011/may/02/tim-anderson-masterchefs-burger-king) gets his own restaurant. Asian/American/European mixed flavor dishes with a heavy slice of whimsy on top. The man is insane, but in a good way. And hmmm. There's a Wahaca across the street I've never been to. I'll add it to the to-do list...

Food trends I don't understand:

- Foam. Seriously, I get that you can make a delicately-flavored foam and that this is very hard to do. Well done, you. Now please keep it off my food; it looks like the cat has been sick on my plate.

- Goji berries. They are not miracle berries. Stop saying that they are.

- Arugula / rocket / roquette. This one seems to be fading but there was a period where it was on everything - sandwiches, salads, pizza. It's bitter, it's nasty, and it pokes you in the face when you try to eat it. There are so many varieties of lettuce and this one becomes popular? Urgh.

WarmNPrickly
05-13-2011, 08:02 AM
Really? Mayonnaise has acid already in it in some form (usually vinegar, but often there's lemon juice too) so why would ramping up the lemon seem so bad?

I've only seen it with lime in the Hispanic isle. I think it's tasty. My assumption was that the lime was the acid.

DrFidelius
05-13-2011, 08:03 AM
"Fusion" stuff, especially when it's really not much of a stretch, like Vietnamese/Thai.

Fuck fusion. If I want Thai, I want Thai.

If you're going to do fusion, have the balls to fuse something INTERESTING. I want to see Helmut Nguyen's House of Bavarian-Vietnamese Fusion Cuisine, or The Norwexican (Herring tacos FTW.)

I would totally eat herring tacos. I would drive out of my way to get herring tacos. Now I need to buy a jar of herring and make some herring tacos this weekend.

The Wife will hate you forever for putting such an idea into my head.

Novelty Bobble
05-13-2011, 08:05 AM
Specifically to the OP. I think any food becoming "trendy" annoys me somewhat.
You can't like it without seeming to be a bandwagon jumper or pretentious, nor dislike it without seeming like you are just a contrarian.
I suppose the one benefit of "fashion" is that we may gain exposure to something that otherwise would pass us by, just a shame that some of them have to come with such baggage.

Overall though, better that we just judge things on their merit to us personally and leave it at that. After all, one person's fashion food is another person's staple diet.

(and this comes from a man who can be very picky about some of the foods and drinks that he buys and wishes that insisting on them didn't make me sound like a knob! I mean, if I were buying mozzarella in a market in rural Lombardy I'd be shocked if it wasn't buffalo sourced and there would be no accusations of "being trendy" if I insisted on it)

Novelty Bobble
05-13-2011, 08:14 AM
- Arugula / rocket / roquette. This one seems to be fading but there was a period where it was on everything - sandwiches, salads, pizza. It's bitter, it's nasty, and it pokes you in the face when you try to eat it. There are so many varieties of lettuce and this one becomes popular? Urgh.

All good points that you make Gyrate.

However, I'll just put a little addendum to your rocket tirade.

I like to have rocket in my salad, I don't wan't it to be my salad. It is so powerful that it needs to be balanced with other, more neutral or sweeter leaves. And that is the problem with fashion right there. When it is a fad people think that more is better and it quite clearly is not.
I suspect that you wouldn't mind it so much if your exposure to it was an occasional peppery hit, rather than a full-on taste and face assault.

(and aren't I the lucky one as I can cycle down to my local beach and bring back handfulls of wild rocket and fennel whenever I like)

Alka Seltzer
05-13-2011, 08:29 AM
Huh? Mounding I can figure out, but steal?

Purloined loin of seal.

I like to have rocket in my salad, I don't wan't it to be my salad. It is so powerful that it needs to be balanced with other, more neutral or sweeter leaves.

Good point. Sometimes there is a good reason something becomes a fad, but not everyone following it understands how to make it work.

Drain Bead
05-13-2011, 08:41 AM
Speaking of weird fusion, there's a restaurant on Ohio State's campus that does Korean and Cajun foods. I can only assume that a very interesting married couple runs the place.

I pretty much enjoy all culinary innovation, so there hasn't been a thing in this thread that bothers me.

Tom Scud
05-13-2011, 08:46 AM
Cupcakes. Why?

Gyrate
05-13-2011, 09:25 AM
I suspect that you wouldn't mind it so much if your exposure to it was an occasional peppery hit, rather than a full-on taste and face assault.Okay, I'll give you that. A little goes a long way.

(Personally I'm a fan of oak leaf lettuce - green or red. Why is this not more widely available?)

Novelty Bobble
05-13-2011, 09:34 AM
Okay, I'll give you that. A little goes a long way.

(Personally I'm a fan of oak leaf lettuce - green or red. Why is this not more widely available?)

I don't know but I'd agree with you. It's good stuff.

Incidentally, just so you can all laugh at me and call me pretentious. I was making a salad the other day and my kids were asking me why you can't eat flowers.

Well of course you can and I noticed that my chives had some beautiful big purply-blue flowers on them. So I picked some, rinsed them off and broke off the florets into the salad. I've never eaten them before but they were a lovely sweet, oniony addition (and the little 'uns thought eating flowers was immense fun)

But then that isn't trendy, as my family will happily tell you, almost by definition anything I do magically becomes un-trendy.

Athena
05-13-2011, 09:38 AM
Well of course you can and I noticed that my chives had some beautiful big purply-blue flowers on them. So I picked some, rinsed them off and broke off the florets into the salad. I've never eaten them before but they were a lovely sweet, oniony addition (and the little 'uns thought eating flowers was immense fun)


I've done that same thing! Chive flowers are delicious and beautiful.

They also make a great compound butter, which is just a fancy way of saying "take a block of butter out of the fridge, let it soften some, and mix something in with it" - in this case, the "something" was the little florets from the chive blossoms. Really good on top of a steak.

Of course, we're about a month away from my chives blossoming, and now I want them today. <sigh>

Novelty Bobble
05-13-2011, 09:49 AM
I've done that same thing! Chive flowers are delicious and beautiful.

They also make a great compound butter, which is just a fancy way of saying "take a block of butter out of the fridge, let it soften some, and mix something in with it" - in this case, the "something" was the little florets from the chive blossoms. Really good on top of a steak.

Of course, we're about a month away from my chives blossoming, and now I want them today. <sigh>

oooooooo! good idea.

Here in the UK we've had an extremely mild dry and sunny spring so everything seems to be doing really well.
I'm also lucky enough to live in Kent "the garden of England" and the seasonal produce here is top notch. We get a local vegetable box delivered every week so whatever is doing well, we get. This week's speciality was asparagus and we are nearly into cherry and raspberry season....woohoo!

zagloba
05-13-2011, 09:54 AM
Speaking of weird fusion, there's a restaurant on Ohio State's campus that does Korean and Cajun foods. I can only assume that a very interesting married couple runs the place.Jambalaya and kimchee -- that could definitely work.

Annie-Xmas
05-13-2011, 09:55 AM
Homemade ice cream. I mean, you can buy the stuff in a store.

Ferret Herder
05-13-2011, 10:08 AM
Cupcakes. Why?
Cake, but in a single-serving size; it's a win-win situation. I'm a bit puzzled by the shops that only sell these, however.

Athena
05-13-2011, 10:24 AM
Homemade ice cream. I mean, you can buy the stuff in a store.

Can't that be said about just about anything?

Ferret Herder
05-13-2011, 10:30 AM
Can't that be said about just about anything?

That was my thought. I frequently make beer, and that takes several weeks to complete, compared to a couple hours (?) at most to make your own ice cream.

aruvqan
05-13-2011, 10:40 AM
I've done that same thing! Chive flowers are delicious and beautiful.

They also make a great compound butter, which is just a fancy way of saying "take a block of butter out of the fridge, let it soften some, and mix something in with it" - in this case, the "something" was the little florets from the chive blossoms. Really good on top of a steak.

Of course, we're about a month away from my chives blossoming, and now I want them today. <sigh>

<perks up> I have chives blossoming in my aerogarden, a head of butter lettuce in the fridge along with some arugala and romaine, and a bag of baby spinach. I can grill up some leftover roast beef and change my salad type for lunch and still stay roughly on plan ....

Except I need another 3g of fiber in something. Bugger.

I eat it anyway.

GargoyleWB
05-13-2011, 10:47 AM
On fusion...

There is this amazing Korean/Greasy-spoon fusion breakfast place in Honolulu. They take traditional American diner breakfast ingredients (eggs, bacon, brkft sausage, biscuits & gravy) and twist them into wonderful meals with Korean spices and additions.

Kimchee omelet with biscuits in a spicy beef broth? Oh yeah!

dangermom
05-13-2011, 10:55 AM
Homemade ice cream. I mean, you can buy the stuff in a store.

:eek: Blasphemy! Clearly you have never tasted my dad's ice cream.

Wait, how is that a trend? People have been making homemade ice cream forever.

salinqmind
05-13-2011, 01:41 PM
Little 'slider burgers', and I KNOW why. It's a ploy by restaurants like Applebees to make you think you're getting something special. They also sell them pre-made in the meat section, and special little buns, and you pay double the price for the novelty. Not to mention a pain in the butt to cook on the grill unless you put them in a special basket.

Larry Mudd
05-13-2011, 01:54 PM
Sliders are awesome for kids' birthday parties.

(The big boys can have real burgers.)

cjepson
05-13-2011, 03:08 PM
Also, I've said this before, but bacon. The whole bacon trend annoys the ever living shit out of me, for some reason. Yes, bacon is delicious. (Hell, I make my own from time to time.) But, goddamit, it doesn't need to be on everything and it easily overpowers food with its agressive flavor. Luckily, I think the bacon craze peaked about two years ago and is on the decline.

This is how I felt about garlic when it suddenly became ubiquitous some years back. Garlic is wonderful, but I got the impression that it got used to cover up a lot of lazy cooking. "This dish is bland?... No problem -- just gratuitously slather a few huge gobs of garlic into it!"

Lasciel
05-13-2011, 04:15 PM
Pho Shizzle: Vietnamese Soul Food

Oh great, I need a new keyboard now.

And a new-business license...

beartato
05-13-2011, 04:24 PM
Homemade ice cream. I mean, you can buy the stuff in a store.

Eh, sort of. You can certainly buy cheap "frozen dessert product" in the store - basically milk and sugar and artificial flavourings whipped up with a shedload of air. And you can buy expensive, crème anglaise based ice cream in the store - good, but like I said, expensive, and always too sweet for my taste. Or you can make your own, delicious, crème anglaise based ice cream, to whatever taste suits you for a lot less. Lime and black olive? Tarragon and strawberry? Plain old vanilla bean? Saffron and chocolate? Anything you like.

beartato
05-13-2011, 04:28 PM
- Foam. Seriously, I get that you can make a delicately-flavored foam and that this is very hard to do. Well done, you. Now please keep it off my food; it looks like the cat has been sick on my plate.


I always say the same thing about foam - I've had it dozens of times. 95 percent of the time, it's just like, oh, foam. Or hey, looks like this person just discovered foam. Or whatever. The other five percent - my goodness my Guinness. It absolutely elevated the dish. It not only added to it, but was an essential component.

pulykamell
05-13-2011, 06:09 PM
Really? Mayonnaise has acid already in it in some form (usually vinegar, but often there's lemon juice too) so why would ramping up the lemon seem so bad?

Yeah, I don't get it. My standard homemade mayo is basically olive oil, egg yolk, lemon, and a touch of Dijon mustard. Lemon juice and/or vinegar is the traditional acid component of mayo. One trick I have to make prepared mayo taste a bit more like homemade mayo (or, at least the type of homemade I like) is to beat in olive oil and lemon juice.

devilsknew
05-14-2011, 05:01 AM
Oh, food trucks.

While I've had good food from trucks there seems to be a sudden acceptance that food served from a truck is somehow automatically superior. There's one food truck near me that has people waiting 20 minutes in line to eat a food that isn't really meant to be eaten while standing that is actually more expensive than and only as good as the same item available from five different restaurants within a half dozen blocks.

I'd rather have senorita's taco trailer, mind you she had neither the money or time for an actual truck. She simply had an old trailer a carnival stove and a flattop. Dishes piled out the backdoor/escape hatch. Crisp flavors and a rustic/roach coach atmosphere.

devilsknew
05-14-2011, 05:27 AM
....And she had a fixed location in a bazar. Mobile can be a disadvantage.

BigT
05-14-2011, 07:52 AM
I don't know if it's because it's Angus or not, but it does always seem to make a better burger. Even the worst (Hardee's/Carl's Jr.) taste significantly better than their non-Angus counterparts (or predecessors, in the case of Hardee's).

BigT
05-14-2011, 07:58 AM
To answer the OP: I unfortunately cannot think of any food trends I don't like, unless replacing cheese with fancy versions without altering the dish is a trend. New cheese is good. But you must tailor the cheese to the dish. Or if you can count people assuming you must like sushi if you are at all intelligent. Maybe the cooked variety, but not uncooked: too slimy.

devilsknew
05-15-2011, 03:23 PM
You know what puts a giant turpentine reeking water bug up my ass? All this gluten free bullshit and trending. Suddenly everybody is "allergic" to gluten and living in their special little rainbow of fruit, nuts, and granola. Krohn's disease is a rare disease and not everybody has it... yes you, you self important, homepathically overdiagnosed, Indigo child.

It's like the ADD of the food world.

Lukeinva
05-15-2011, 03:57 PM
The Spanish would like to have a few words with you.

I don't know whether you wanted your question answered, but a traditional aioli is garlic, olive oil, and egg.

Actually.. in Spain the correct pronunciation is Ali Oli and the correct ingredients is only garlic and olive oil. Smashed and mixed with a mortar and pestle.

what do I type here
05-15-2011, 05:35 PM
Turducken was trendy on the internet among the Stuff White People Like types, like bacon is now. I've never had it but I find the concept distasteful. Two different animals in the same dish is gross.

Edit: Although a lot of lunch meat is made of combinations of cow, chicken and/or pig, and I enjoy that...

Angel of the Lord
05-15-2011, 05:45 PM
You know what puts a giant turpentine reeking water bug up my ass? All this gluten free bullshit and trending. Suddenly everybody is "allergic" to gluten and living in their special little rainbow of fruit, nuts, and granola. Krohn's disease is a rare disease and not everybody has it... yes you, you self important, homepathically overdiagnosed, Indigo child.

It's like the ADD of the food world.


Yeah. They changed my favorite rice crackers to be gluten-free. In the process, they completely ruined the crunch. I wouldn't mind them being an option, but do *all* the damn crackers have to be gluten free? Lame.

As for me, for a while, there was the "put jalepeños on it" trend. I don't like the taste of most peppers. I mean, I don't mind the heat, but I'm not keen on the taste. And it clings to everything. And everyone wanted them on otherwise delicious food, like cheese curds or burgers or cornbread. Bleh.

Bridget Burke
05-15-2011, 05:46 PM
Turducken has been a Cajun favorite for quite a few years now. Ooh, somebody outside the Louisiana/Texas axis just discovered it? So suddenly it's "Trendy."

Myself, I'm not against the concept of Trendy, but execution can fail.

TBG
05-15-2011, 06:42 PM
Yeah. They changed my favorite rice crackers to be gluten-free. In the process, they completely ruined the crunch. I wouldn't mind them being an option, but do *all* the damn crackers have to be gluten free? Lame.

I can't tell you how many things like cereal have recently been ruined this way when it became trendy to make them all "whole grain". Completely ruins the texture of anything it's in to me.

SciFiSam
05-15-2011, 06:53 PM
Cake, but in a single-serving size; it's a win-win situation. I'm a bit puzzled by the shops that only sell these, however.

What I don't get is how they've become trendy. Cupcakes have always been on sale in every shop from the tiniest corner to the biggest hypermarket, and they're one of the easiest cakes to make - lots of parents will make them with their toddlers. Now I see them on sale at specialist shops for like £3 a cake. :confused:

It's as if bread suddenly became fashionable. And I don't mean foccacia, ciabatta or whatever, but the simplest sandwich bread.

SciFiSam
05-15-2011, 06:58 PM
You know what puts a giant turpentine reeking water bug up my ass? All this gluten free bullshit and trending. Suddenly everybody is "allergic" to gluten and living in their special little rainbow of fruit, nuts, and granola. Krohn's disease is a rare disease and not everybody has it... yes you, you self important, homepathically overdiagnosed, Indigo child.

It's like the ADD of the food world.

I'm with you on there being a trend to claim gluten intolerance, but coeliac disease is the usual cause of genuine gluten intolerance; Crohn's disease is only tangentially connected to diet.

rhubarbarin
05-15-2011, 08:48 PM
Sushi. Don't get me wrong, I like it (but I like everything), but can't understand the massive appeal to so many Americans.

cuauhtemoc
05-15-2011, 09:27 PM
What I don't get is how they've become trendy. Cupcakes have always been on sale in every shop from the tiniest corner to the biggest hypermarket, and they're one of the easiest cakes to make - lots of parents will make them with their toddlers. Now I see them on sale at specialist shops for like £3 a cake.

Yesyesyesyesyes!!! I thought the same thing when cupcakes suddenly became "trendy". I picture a boardroom full of powerful trendsetters, all trying to decide what's the new "in" thing is going to be. It's late, they're tired, they want to go home... all of a sudden, somebody says "How about cupcakes?" And now cupcakes are somehow fashionable.

I first noticed it last July. There were cupcake trucks all over downtown. It was about 94 degrees and 100% humidity. "Just what I'm craving right now," I thought. "With a big glass of milk on the side. Now that's what I call Summer!"

pulykamell
05-16-2011, 12:58 AM
Sushi. Don't get me wrong, I like it (but I like everything), but can't understand the massive appeal to so many Americans.

I would have agreed with you maybe 20 years ago, but now it's become such a mainstream part of American food culture, that it's impossible to call it "trendy." Well, in my opinion, at any rate.

Maiira
05-16-2011, 01:40 AM
Acai berries and pomegranates as "superfoods." First of all, "superfood" is a stupid word. Second of all, stop touting these foods as miracle workers that cure cancer, rid your body of (unspecified and possibly fictional) toxins, and make you shit rainbows. They don't. Eat pomegranates because they're delicious, not because you want to be Superman. (And though I haven't tried acai berries, I hear they're nothing to write home about.)

Also, really really fancy and/or elaborate cakes. I get wedding cakes. I don't get cakes that are in the shapes of roller coasters. You're going to be destroying it in a few minutes, what's the point? I used to like the TV shows that showed them being made (like Cake Boss) but now they've just gotten ridiculous. (Also, when they're sculpting the cakes into said elaborate shapes, they seem to just throw out all of the shavings--what a damn waste!)

drastic_quench
05-16-2011, 01:56 AM
Eh, cake is cheap; art and skill are expensive. The leftover paint on the palette isn't worth as much as the paint that ends up on the canvas. I like the cake art that ends up featured as "Sunday Sweets" over at the Cake Wrecks (http://cakewrecks.blogspot.com/) blog. Check out Sunday's asparagus one! I will likely never buy a cake like that, and I would not want to eat a bunch of fondant, but there's still bakeries putting out art cakes like this old school masterpiece (http://i.imgur.com/KWhIL.jpg).

devilsknew
05-16-2011, 03:08 AM
I'm with you on there being a trend to claim gluten intolerance, but coeliac disease is the usual cause of genuine gluten intolerance; Crohn's disease is only tangentially connected to diet.

Thanks for correcting me there, I suppose as a special snowflake list, it would go coeliacs, Crohn's, nut allergies, and any other bullshit "allergies" that everybody seems to have nowadays.

And you know, it really pisses me off, because it makes the real allergy sufferers seem like they are crying wolf.

Novelty Bobble
05-16-2011, 04:50 AM
Thanks for correcting me there, I suppose as a special snowflake list, it would go coeliacs, Crohn's, nut allergies, and any other bullshit "allergies" that everybody seems to have nowadays.

And you know, it really pisses me off, because it makes the real allergy sufferers seem like they are crying wolf.

Count me in on this as well.
My daughter has a genuine egg allergy (as in, "comes up in a rash and requires an antihistamine solution and carries an epipen")
And we have to be careful what we order and I always end up feeling slightly uncomfortable when asking for allergy clarifications as I imagine people are thinking me to be one of "those" parents.

drastic_quench
05-16-2011, 04:57 AM
Thanks for correcting me there, I suppose as a special snowflake list, it would go coeliacs, Crohn's, nut allergies, and any other bullshit "allergies" that everybody seems to have nowadays.

And you know, it really pisses me off, because it makes the real allergy sufferers seem like they are crying wolf.

Actually, I am allergic to wolf tears.

SciFiSam
05-16-2011, 05:09 AM
Thanks for correcting me there, I suppose as a special snowflake list, it would go coeliacs, Crohn's, nut allergies, and any other bullshit "allergies" that everybody seems to have nowadays.

And you know, it really pisses me off, because it makes the real allergy sufferers seem like they are crying wolf.

It does, and although that has disadvantages, there are advantages too. I have proper coeliac disease, diagnosed by blood and stool tests at proper doctor's, not a pin-prick at a health food shop shop, and I have had people flat-out not believe me and trick me into eating wheat and getting ill. OTOH, it's much easier to get hold of gluten-free products than it otherwise would be.

I'm assuming you weren't saying that those diseases are bullshit in themselves, because they're not exactly in contention as really existing, but yeah, some people claim to have wheat or gluten intolerances without actually having them. Crazy people - it's an incredibly awkward diet.

running coach
05-16-2011, 05:28 AM
I'm assuming you weren't saying that those diseases are bullshit in themselves, because they're not exactly in contention as really existing, but yeah, some people claim to have wheat or gluten intolerances without actually having them. Crazy people - it's an incredibly awkward diet.

The latest trend in fad diets is claiming that grains are bad for you.
Paleo diet. (http://thepaleodiet.com/)

BigT
05-16-2011, 06:27 AM
Thanks for correcting me there, I suppose as a special snowflake list, it would go coeliacs, Crohn's, nut allergies, and any other bullshit "allergies" that everybody seems to have nowadays.

And you know, it really pisses me off, because it makes the real allergy sufferers seem like they are crying wolf.

Yip. My sister had actual allergy tests from an actual M.D. You know, the pin prick kind. She gets rashes, numbness in her mouth, trouble breathing, etc. Too many places do not take this thing seriously, even if, around here, most people actually do.

beartato
05-16-2011, 06:34 AM
The latest trend in fad diets is claiming that grains are bad for you.
Paleo diet. (http://thepaleodiet.com/)

Sure, that exists, but most people falsely claiming a gluten allergy will be:
- women
- who are trying to lose weight
- and know most grains are high in carbs and calories
- and are apparently unable to use willpower to not eat grains, and instead create a false "allergy" to avoid them.

phantom lamb
05-16-2011, 08:14 AM
Garlic is wonderful, but I got the impression that it got used to cover up a lot of lazy cooking. "This dish is bland?... No problem -- just gratuitously slather a few huge gobs of garlic into it!"

Hey, if it works every time - I don't see the problem. Garlic is just too delicious and we should definitely use that to our advantage (whether it's to compensate our culinary shortcomings or just make a good dish taste that much better). :cool:

kiz
05-16-2011, 08:48 AM
Cake, but in a single-serving size; it's a win-win situation. I'm a bit puzzled by the shops that only sell these, however.

There's a cupcake bakery near me. How it manages to stay open is mind-boggling, considering that other than selling brownies and cookies, it sells nothing else.

Obviously there's a market for single-serving baked goods?

Gyrate
05-16-2011, 08:56 AM
There's a cupcake bakery near me. How it manages to stay open is mind-boggling, considering that other than selling brownies and cookies, it sells nothing else.

Obviously there's a market for single-serving baked goods?There are a lot of cookie shops. There are a lot of doughnut shops. There are a lot of cake shops. Why not cupcakes?

Scumpup
05-16-2011, 09:53 AM
WRT the big chains, especially fast food, being "late to the party" on food trends: It takes some considerable time for them to go from having the idea to include an item, through having their labs/test kitchens devise dishes using the item, through testing and test marketing those items to decide which one to bring to market, to finally bringing the many individual stores on board with it.

Joe Schmoe's family restaurant can just buy a couple jars of chipotle nước mắm lime mayonaise, slather some on the scrapple sliders they already sell and market their new Mexicanese-Pennsylvania Dutch fusion sandwich. If it doesn't sell, they're not out much. For the bigger chains, it's a bigger risk and they don't want to rush something to market that they aren't reasonably sure will sell. Even then, they sometimes strike out. Remember the McDLT?

ralph124c
05-16-2011, 12:29 PM
Who invented this moniker?
I guess its a neat way to sell meatloaf, macaroni and cheese as entrees (at $19 a plate).
Just think-Ma's home cooking-at NYC prices!
I wonder what kind of wine to serve with mac&cheese?

overlyverbose
05-16-2011, 12:40 PM
Little 'slider burgers', and I KNOW why. It's a ploy by restaurants like Applebees to make you think you're getting something special. They also sell them pre-made in the meat section, and special little buns, and you pay double the price for the novelty. Not to mention a pain in the butt to cook on the grill unless you put them in a special basket.

It drove me nuts when sliders and other mini fast food suddenly became popular for weddings. I mean, for kids sure, but a wedding?? I think it was Britney Spears who made that trend popular. She's now permanently on my black list.

I also wasn't a fan of fake meat when vegetarianism became more mainstream. Why make a vegetarian version of meat when other vegetable-based vegetarian foods are just as tasty?

Gymnopithys
05-16-2011, 01:09 PM
What about peeps ?

and multicolored meringues :rolleyes:

Saint Cad
05-16-2011, 01:17 PM
Would you like some grapes?

Then he waddled away. <waddle> <waddle>

GoodOmens
05-16-2011, 01:20 PM
Little 'slider burgers', and I KNOW why. It's a ploy by restaurants like Applebees to make you think you're getting something special. They also sell them pre-made in the meat section, and special little buns, and you pay double the price for the novelty. Not to mention a pain in the butt to cook on the grill unless you put them in a special basket.

Yep, I never got the little cheeseburger trend. If you want a cheeseburger, don't trick yourself that it's healthy by getting a small one, especially not when you eat 4.

Put simply, White Castle is not food that deserves to be emulated.

Ellen Cherry
05-16-2011, 01:23 PM
Ask and you shall receive. I give you Wahaca (http://www.wahaca.co.uk/html/3_marketfood.html) in London.
I often have the herring tacos. Marinated and served with olives and tomato if my memory serves me correctly....yum!

Not that I speak Spanish or anything, but is this a phonetic spelling of Oaxaca?

Lady of the Lake
05-16-2011, 04:00 PM
There's a TexMex-Thai place near me at work. Does that suffice? Curry burritos.

This sounds...really good.

Yep, I never got the little cheeseburger trend. If you want a cheeseburger, don't trick yourself that it's healthy by getting a small one, especially not when you eat 4.

Put simply, White Castle is not food that deserves to be emulated.

I'm not tricking myself that it's healthy. :) I just love that's it's less meat and more bread/cheese/onions than regular burgers. It's candy in burger form. Granted, I mainly have had white castle while drunk, so my opinion could be influenced just a bit...

Novelty Bobble
05-16-2011, 04:13 PM
Not that I speak Spanish or anything, but is this a phonetic spelling of Oaxaca?

It is indeed.

Angel of the Lord
05-16-2011, 04:22 PM
Yep, I never got the little cheeseburger trend. If you want a cheeseburger, don't trick yourself that it's healthy by getting a small one, especially not when you eat 4.

True, but if you really want to have a cheeseburger, it's better to have a small one than a huge one. Portion control is nice.

Another thing I don't understand: the bacon trend--or, rather, the bacon flavoring trend. I mean, sure, I like bacon. I love it on sandwiches, or for breakfast. I have been known to have a plain old bacon sandwich (admittedly, this was in college, where such gauche things are overlooked)--no lettuce, no tomato, no mayo. Just me and the pig.

That being said, bacon salt? Bacon flavored snacks? Bacon flavor in general? Blech. It's never right. Ever. It's just. . .rancid and smokey. And even regular bacon--honest to pete, people, it doesn't need to be on freaking everything. Especially when it's improperly cooked, which to me is anything without crunch. Chewy, smoky fat. Pass.

Ellen Cherry
05-16-2011, 04:26 PM
Both the coffee and bacon trends amuse me. I mean, I like coffee as much as the next joe (ha!) but when the world went all Starbucksie, I couldn't help but marvel at how hip and cool my 80-something grandparents had become, what with their cutting-edge coffee consumption and morning bacon-frying. :)

Swords to Plowshares
05-16-2011, 04:29 PM
Actually.. in Spain the correct pronunciation is Ali Oli and the correct ingredients is only garlic and olive oil. Smashed and mixed with a mortar and pestle.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aioli

In Catalan they omit the egg, but it doesn't mean that everywhere it is "correct" to omit the egg.

Hmm, did some more research and apparently the no-egg is more traditional, but it's a royal pain in the ass to emulsify with a mortar and pestle, so egg is usually included to make things easier.

Lukeinva
05-16-2011, 04:53 PM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aioli

In Catalan they omit the egg, but it doesn't mean that everywhere it is "correct" to omit the egg.

Hmm, did some more research and apparently the no-egg is more traditional, but it's a royal pain in the ass to emulsify with a mortar and pestle, so egg is usually included to make things easier.

Right. For ali oli there are only two ingredients ali (garlic) and oli (oil). Adding egg (yolk) and now you are making mayonnaise (also invented in Spain). Obviously garlic is optional for the mayo, but for my tastes absolutely add the garlic. And a good squirt of sriracha :)

Swords to Plowshares
05-16-2011, 04:57 PM
You can still call it aioli/alioli/allioli if it contains egg. I doubt anyone besides the most hardcore Catalan purists would object. Anyways, I don't want to derail this thread any further.

kath94
05-16-2011, 06:03 PM
Cupcakes. Why?

Because of the great ratio of icing to cake. And because you can buy just one and eat it all and not feel guilty.

I, for one, do not lament the cupcake craze.

Gyrate
05-17-2011, 05:03 AM
Then he waddled away. <waddle> <waddle>Gaah! Earworm! I may have to hurt you now.

I agree with Angel of the Lord. Bacon is good. Bacon-flavored things - not so good. If I want something that tastes like bacon, I eat bacon.

bump
05-17-2011, 09:24 AM
If you're going to do fusion, have the balls to fuse something INTERESTING. I want to see Helmut Nguyen's House of Bavarian-Vietnamese Fusion Cuisine, or The Norwexican (Herring tacos FTW.)

I prefer "Mexiwegian" myself.

Anyway, usually the thing that makes me wonder isn't whether or not the food or drink in questions is a good one or not, it's that so many people settle for such debased versions of the real thing. More of a trendy behavior thing than a specific food.

You see this a lot with drinks- how many people go from drinking Folger's red can coffee to Starbucks or Dunkin Donuts with some pretense of sophistication? Or who drink Mojitos (for an example; this woudl apply to any other drink) made with cheap rum, no actual mint or lime juice, and some factory-made mix?

That strikes me as the ultimate in trendy; the people can order a mojito or a special cup of coffee, but don't even realize that what they're getting isn't what made the drink popular.

That's what makes me ask "Why?"

lindsaybluth
05-18-2011, 05:07 PM
I don't understand a lot of the hype for:
-fresh buffalo mozzarella cheese...little balls of tasteless putty
-exotic coffees (don't mention kopi liwok)
-quinoa (tastes like little beads of styrofoam)
-"free range chicken"-usually tough
-miniature vegetables (no flavor)
I also don't understand why the practice of monding your food-why put the steal on top of tyhe mashed potatoes? I prefer stuff arranged where I can see everything at once.

As far as I know, fresh mozz has been on real Italian pizza for awhile and paired with fresh tomatoes, basil and balsamic vinegar and olive oil since the beginning of time. Alone it's odd, that's for sure, just like eating olive oil alone would be weird.

Quinoa tastes nutty, kind of like couscous. It shouldn't taste like styrofoam.

Free range chicken can be shit, depending on purveyor. Hear ya on that one.

I've always found baby vegetables to be sweeter and more tender than their adult counterparts.

Bacon is good but when did there ever need to be a bacon cocktail!?

If I see risotto on a menu in Pittsburgh one more time, I'm going to stand on the bar and scream "WHY ARE YOU PEOPLE 5 YEARS BEHIND EVERYONE ON THE COASTS!?"

overlyverbose
05-18-2011, 05:23 PM
Just thought of another one, though I think it's gone out of fashion lately.

What was with all the artisan gourmet cooking salts? Not only is there bacon salt, but there's also a special French sea salt that supposed to smell like violets when it dries (Fleur De Sel de Camargue), Salin du Midi, Hawaiian sea salts, smoked salt, grey sea salt... The list just goes on.

pulykamell
05-18-2011, 05:24 PM
Alone it's odd, that's for sure, just like eating olive oil alone would be weird.


Not really. A true mozzarella di buffala or, for that matter a great housemade mozzarella is fantastic on its own. A nice little bit of pepper and drizzle of olive oil helps, or you could amp it up with some tomatoes and basil for a caprese salad, but it's plenty delicious in its bare state. You honestly don't need anything more in it. It feels like the essence of milk in your mouth, like a cheese sponge. When you bite in, you get the delicate firmness of the mozzarella flesh, and then this sort of sponge-like release of whey as you chew. It's not gummy or putty-like in the least, if it's a good mozzarella.

lindsaybluth
05-18-2011, 09:59 PM
Nah, I've had good stuff from an Italian wholesaler, the kind that sells eighteen kinds of olives where people shout at each other in Italian. Still has a weird texture all alone, like you said, spongey. Caprese makes it sing, though.

Salt is ridiculous, like overly said.

pulykamell
05-18-2011, 10:14 PM
To each, their own. I'm used to eating it plain or with prosciutto. Only in the late summer when there's fresh tomatoes might I have it in a Caprese.

zoid
05-18-2011, 10:48 PM
There's a place just outside Chicago (Berwyn) called Freddie's Pizza that wraps prosciutto around marinated asparagus and fresh buffalo mozzarella. I's mind blowing as an appetizer and just wouldn't be the same without the fresh buffalo mozzarella. It definitely has it's place.

lindsaybluth
05-18-2011, 11:20 PM
To each, their own. I'm used to eating it plain or with prosciutto. Only in the late summer when there's fresh tomatoes might I have it in a Caprese.

I think you should start a follow up thread - "Delicious food - why not?" where we can discuss the merits and drawbacks of all things extremely tasty. I guess we could cap it at "food you've discovered in the last 5-7 years" to keep things from getting too crazy :p