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keeganst94
07-22-2011, 09:02 AM
According to the Department of Justice an estimated 216 000 prisoners are raped in the U.S, believe it or not usually by the guards. Source (http://reason.com/archives/2011/06/20/rape-factories).

So, what do we do about that?

furt
07-22-2011, 09:12 AM
According to the Department of Justice an estimated 216 000 prisoners are raped in the U.S, believe it or not usually by the guards. Source (http://reason.com/archives/2011/06/20/rape-factories).

So, what do we do about that?
Stop putting so many people in there, for one. Less overcrowding = fewer opportunities.

Really Not All That Bright
07-22-2011, 09:15 AM
That article misstates or massages the Department of Justice figures. The actually number is 88,500, according to the DOJ (http://bjs.ojp.usdoj.gov/content/pub/pdf/svpjri0809.pdf).

However, the part about Holder's refusal to implement the PREA Commission's recommendations is true, and it pissed a lot of people off.

As far as what we do about it, we can't really do anything. Voters don't care about prison conditions, and hence Congress and the states aren't interested in spending money on prisons (other than to build them).

To eliminate prison sex abuse, you need lots of money to hire more and better trained personnel, IMHO.

Paging Little Nemo and Quadgop the Misspelled.

ETA: It's also true that most of the abuse is by staff rather than other inmates, although the article is misleading because it implies that this is true for both women and men; it's only true for men.

David42
07-22-2011, 09:18 AM
First we reduce prison populations so that the non-violent are released. Burglars and those who commit serious thefts can stay behind bars with the violent. Property crimes are generally as serious as violence.

After that with the savings we put cameras everywhere in the prisons. We make sure the signals are routed to multiple drives. One drive to be monitored by prison employees, at least one other goes to the attorneys general of each state and or the department of Justice; at least one other citizens are given access too so they can oversee any loved ones in prison, or make it available online.

Finally write laws that severely punish anyone who looks the other way or fails to act. These laws need to be presumptive that if the act was caught on camera and the warden did nothing, then he is guilty as an accomplice.

That should eliminate most of it.

Grumman
07-22-2011, 09:20 AM
I'm guessing that shooting prison rapists is not an option.

Really Not All That Bright
07-22-2011, 09:22 AM
Who is going to be watching all these cameras?

FinnAgain
07-22-2011, 09:27 AM
I'm sure that there's a Rule 34 category to cover it.

zoid
07-22-2011, 09:34 AM
ETA: It's also true that most of the abuse is by staff rather than other inmates, although the article is misleading because it implies that this is true for both women and men; it's only true for men.

Are you saying that most men who are raped are raped by staff?
That seems counterintuitive. I'm not saying it isn't true but it seems odd.

Capitaine Zombie
07-22-2011, 09:35 AM
ETA: It's also true that most of the abuse is by staff rather than other inmates, although the article is misleading because it implies that this is true for both women and men; it's only true for men.

You mean there's no sexual agression/rape from female wardens on female prisoners? Sounds weird to me. Where do you get that from?

keeganst94
07-22-2011, 09:39 AM
All of your proposed solutions would seem to make things better, but is their the political will for it? Politicians seem to want to appear tough on crime and most solutions would require a lot of money to implement, in a time when America may very well default. That makes me think no. Does anyone actually see any being taken in the near future?

Really Not All That Bright
07-22-2011, 09:40 AM
Are you saying that most men who are raped are raped by staff?
Exactly that. If you look at the link to the DOJ figures (http://bjs.ojp.usdoj.gov/content/pub/pdf/svpjri0809.pdf), only 34,000 male inmates reported being assaulted by inmates (page 21). 53,000 male inmates reported being assaulted by staff (p. 22).

For women, the numbers are 12,000 and 16,000, respectively.

It does seem counter-intuitive, but I strongly suspect the reasons are (1) less overcrowding in womens' correctional facilities, and (2) much closer oversight of female prisoners.

emacknight
07-22-2011, 09:46 AM
What is the connection between overcrowding and increased rape?

Capitaine Zombie
07-22-2011, 09:47 AM
What is the connection between overcrowding and increased rape?

Dick room.

ladyfoxfyre
07-22-2011, 09:54 AM
As sad as it is to say, I don't think this will get any public support at all. I think the consensus among a lot of people (not me) is that if you're getting raped in prison, "maybe you shouldn't have done X crime and you wouldn't BE in prison...". So, any movement to improve prison conditions has very little public support. Take for instance the supreme court order for CA prisons to improve conditions or release large numbers of convicts.

DigitalC
07-22-2011, 10:00 AM
Exactly that. If you look at the link to the DOJ figures (http://bjs.ojp.usdoj.gov/content/pub/pdf/svpjri0809.pdf), only 34,000 male inmates reported being assaulted by inmates (page 21). 53,000 male inmates reported being assaulted by staff (p. 22).


I think an inmate would be a lot more likely to claim to have been raped by a guard than to snitch on another inmate.

elmwood
07-22-2011, 10:02 AM
As sad as it is to say, I don't think this will get any public support at all. I think the consensus among a lot of people (not me) is that if you're getting raped in prison, "maybe you shouldn't have done X crime and you wouldn't BE in prison...". .

I agree. However, people are getting sentenced to incarceration, not rape, a point that doesn't seem to be getting across. It's the United States, not Pakistan where people do get sentenced to rape.

David42
07-22-2011, 10:12 AM
Who is going to be watching all these cameras?

1. Prison guards (with savings from release of the non-violent more can be devoted to this task)
2.AGs/DOJ (reviews)
3. The public online.

I do believe I explained that.

ladyfoxfyre
07-22-2011, 10:20 AM
I agree. However, people are getting sentenced to incarceration, not rape, a point that doesn't seem to be getting across. It's the United States, not Pakistan where people do get sentenced to rape.

Then there needs to be more effort to get the point across that it's a much more prevalent problem than people think. Is the US unique in the prevalence of prison rape or is it very common in other (more civilized) countries?

Clothahump
07-22-2011, 10:24 AM
Stop putting so many people in there, for one. Less overcrowding = fewer opportunities.

Oh, so we just slap them on the wrist and let them continue pillaging society at large? That's worked out well for us so far, hasn't it?

Really Not All That Bright
07-22-2011, 10:27 AM
I think an inmate would be a lot more likely to claim to have been raped by a guard than to snitch on another inmate.
Doubtful. Everyone knows prisoners are the most litigious people on earth, but the DOJ figures are based on direct surveys, not on the number of complaints filed.

Dogzilla
07-22-2011, 10:39 AM
I agree. However, people are getting sentenced to incarceration, not rape, a point that doesn't seem to be getting across. It's the United States, not Pakistan where people do get sentenced to rape.

Exactly. It seems like a slick way to get around the Constitutional prohibition against cruel and unusual punishment.

Really Not All That Bright
07-22-2011, 10:45 AM
Well, clearly it's not that unusual.

tumbleddown
07-22-2011, 11:17 AM
Oh, so we just slap them on the wrist and let them continue pillaging society at large? That's worked out well for us so far, hasn't it?
No, the first thing we'd have to do is realize that the War On Some Drugs has been an abysmal failure and start reframing laws and penalties so that we're no longer imprisoning people for marijuana offenses, which constitute slightly more than half of all drug arrests, and have for more than a decade. Legalization will go a long way toward reducing our prison populations.

Little Nemo
07-22-2011, 11:23 AM
Let's get a little perspective here. People are talking about rape being prevalent and all. According to the report that was cited in the OP, 95.6% of all prisoners said they had not been sexually victimized in any way. Compare the 4.4% of prisoners who have been sexually victimized to the 17.6% of all women who have been sexually victimized and the 3% of all men who have been sexually victimized.

And let's distinguish between rape and other types of sexual victimization. When people talk about prison rape, they're thinking about Andy Dufresne getting raped by Bogs Diamond in the shower. But forcible rape is the least common type of sexual crime to occur in prison. Most sex crimes are consensual - a prisoner might be coerced into agreeing to or voluntarily offer sex in exchange for favors. But from a legal standpoint, all sexual acts are illegal and any sex between a prisoner and an employee is non-consensual.

I'll note that the majority of sexual victimization involving staff is "touching". I'm well aware of these cases - it's a common event for a prisoner to accuse a guard of fondling him during a pat frisk. Accusing a guard of being a homosexual is a routine form of harassment. I'll point out that all of these accusations are investigated and documented. Any accusation of actual sex occurring automatically brings in outside police investigators.

David42 suggested some things prisons should be doing. Pretty much all of them have already been done years ago. Prisons are all hooked up with cameras, the cameras are monitored by outside agencies, we do have all of the laws he suggested. The only thing we don't do is allow people on the street to watch the cameras - because not surprisingly most prisoners do not want to have their lives turned into a reality show for the general public.

Little Nemo
07-22-2011, 11:27 AM
No, the first thing we'd have to do is realize that the War On Some Drugs has been an abysmal failure and start reframing laws and penalties so that we're no longer imprisoning people for marijuana offenses, which constitute slightly more than half of all drug arrests, and have for more than a decade. Legalization will go a long way toward reducing our prison populations.That's really more of a legal reform than a prison reform. Prisons have no say in who goes to prison.

But I will point out that if your released every person in prison who was serving time just for marijuana possession, you wouldn't even notice they were gone - it's less than one percent.

aldiboronti
07-22-2011, 11:31 AM
It doesn't take much thought to realize that most inmate-on-inmate rape would go unreported for reasons which are obvious, making the kinds of figures we've seen cited in this thread unreliable.. To conclude on the basis of such figures that guards are responsible for most prison rapes is unsafe, to say the very least.

kayaker
07-22-2011, 11:32 AM
Who is going to be watching all these cameras?

Pay per view?

Really Not All That Bright
07-22-2011, 11:38 AM
It doesn't take much thought to realize that most inmate-on-inmate rape would go unreported for reasons which are obvious, making the kinds of figures we've seen cited in this thread unreliable.. To conclude on the basis of such figures that guards are responsible for most prison rapes is unsafe, to say the very least.
Again, the figures are based on a survey of prisoners, not compiled from reported assaults. They could of course still be unreliable, but there's no real motive to lie.

BlackKnight
07-22-2011, 11:53 AM
Most sex crimes are consensual - a prisoner might be coerced into agreeing to or voluntarily offer sex in exchange for favors.
If a prisoner is coerced, then by definition it is not consensual.

Little Nemo
07-22-2011, 11:55 AM
Something I've posted in the past. Prison is the worst possible place to commit a rape. One, you're surrounded by guards. But even more relevant, you can't leave the crime scene.

Imagine somebody just held a knife to your throat and raped you. Imagine what you would want to do to your rapist if you had the chance.

Now imagine you know exactly where your rapist lives and he can't go anywhere.

Really Not All That Bright
07-22-2011, 11:55 AM
If a prisoner is coerced, then by definition it is not consensual.
Sure it is. The coercion itself may give rise to another criminal charge, but rape requires force or the threat of force.

code_grey
07-22-2011, 11:56 AM
Then there needs to be more effort to get the point across that it's a much more prevalent problem than people think. Is the US unique in the prevalence of prison rape or is it very common in other (more civilized) countries?
other "more civilized" countries don't have as many blacks in prison. They also don't have lots of whites incarcerated next to the blacks.

Little Nemo
07-22-2011, 11:57 AM
If a prisoner is coerced, then by definition it is not consensual.Coercion is not the same as force.

Really Not All That Bright
07-22-2011, 11:59 AM
other "more civilized" countries don't have as many blacks in prison. They also don't have lots of whites incarcerated next to the blacks.
Uh... so what?

In any case, that's patently untrue. African-Americans make up 12% of the US prison population; Afro-Carribeans make up 11% of the UK prison population.

Czarcasm
07-22-2011, 11:59 AM
Again, the figures are based on a survey of prisoners, not compiled from reported assaults. They could of course still be unreliable, but there's no real motive to lie.Except that prisoners have no reason to believe that any surveys they participate in will be kept private. Paranoia(justified, for the most part) might cause them to answer as they have.

Really Not All That Bright
07-22-2011, 12:02 PM
Perhaps, but the NIS-2 is anonymous.

Czarcasm
07-22-2011, 12:14 PM
Perhaps, but the NIS-2 is anonymous.Inmates taking the computer survey would suspect they were being monitored by prison staff, and those taking the paper survey would have no reason to trust either those distributing the surveys or those picking them up. Prisoners expect no privacy rights-"We're from the Government-Trust us" might not convince those in prison.

scule
07-22-2011, 12:19 PM
I think an inmate would be a lot more likely to claim to have been raped by a guard than to snitch on another inmate.

Exactly. I've worked with some people who've dealt with inmates (in the health care field), and they insist that the number of inmates who come in for sexual assault injuries and treatment far outweighs what's reported. I wouldn't doubt that the vast majority of sexual assault in prison is inmate-on-inmate, but they just don't snitch. Stigma is a powerful tool of oppression.

Really Not All That Bright
07-22-2011, 12:40 PM
Inmates taking the computer survey would suspect they were being monitored by prison staff, and those taking the paper survey would have no reason to trust either those distributing the surveys or those picking them up. Prisoners expect no privacy rights-"We're from the Government-Trust us" might not convince those in prison.
That's a possible (though IMHO spurious) reason to believe the survey under-reports abuse by prison staff. What reason is there to believe it under-reports abuse by inmates?

Little Nemo
07-22-2011, 01:05 PM
Except that prisoners have no reason to believe that any surveys they participate in will be kept private. Paranoia(justified, for the most part) might cause them to answer as they have.You can equally well make a plausible argument that prisoners who have been sexually victimized have more reason to participate in a voluntary study of the subject. So the participants are a self-selected group with a higher-than-average percentage of victims. And that would mean that the genuine percentage of sexual victims is lower than four percent.

There's no point in going back and forth on the issue. For the purposes of this thread, let's assume the figures we have are accurate.

Czarcasm
07-22-2011, 01:19 PM
You can equally well make a plausible argument that prisoners who have been sexually victimized have more reason to participate in a voluntary study of the subject. So the participants are a self-selected group with a higher-than-average percentage of victims. And that would mean that the genuine percentage of sexual victims is lower than four percent.

There's no point in going back and forth on the issue. For the purposes of this thread, let's assume the figures we have are accurate.Because the OP did not stipulate that for the purposes of this thread we are to assume that the figures given are correct, questioning those figures is certainly within reason.

ladyfoxfyre
07-22-2011, 01:27 PM
other "more civilized" countries don't have as many blacks in prison. They also don't have lots of whites incarcerated next to the blacks.

Uh, what?

Little Nemo
07-22-2011, 02:03 PM
Uh, what?If you want to follow along with code_grey's views on race and prison conditions, you check this thread (http://boards.straightdope.com/sdmb/showthread.php?t=617136).

keeganst94
07-22-2011, 02:57 PM
Exactly. I've worked with some people who've dealt with inmates (in the health care field), and they insist that the number of inmates who come in for sexual assault injuries and treatment far outweighs what's reported. I wouldn't doubt that the vast majority of sexual assault in prison is inmate-on-inmate, but they just don't snitch. Stigma is a powerful tool of oppression.

I think that it would be the opposite, actually. I mean lets say you're in prison, and you're raped by a guard. Who are you going to report him to? The other guards, who are his friends and coworkers? And lets not forget that this person could make your life extremely difficult without all that much trouble. I think if it was an inmate, at least it's just another guy. If it's a guard, he has real power over you.

code_grey
07-23-2011, 03:24 PM
Uh... so what?

In any case, that's patently untrue. African-Americans make up 12% of the US prison population; Afro-Carribeans make up 11% of the UK prison population.
Your claim is not just false, it is patently absurd. American blacks are 12% of American population, not of American prison population. Haven't you heard about disproportionate incarceration of blacks by the racist justice system? :D

Quoth http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Incarceration_in_the_United_States

According to the US Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) non-Hispanic blacks accounted for 39.4% of the total prison and jail population in 2009.[38] According to the 2010 census of the US Census Bureau blacks (including Hispanic blacks) comprised 12.6% of the US population.[39][40][41]

Hispanics (of all races) were 20.6% of the total jail and prison population in 2009.[38]. Hispanics comprised 16.3% of the US population according to the 2010 US census.[39]

In 2009 black non-Hispanic males were incarcerated at the rate of 4,749 inmates per 100,000 U.S. residents of the same race and gender. White males were incarcerated at the rate of 708 inmates per 100,000 U.S. residents. Hispanic males were incarcerated at the rate of 1,822 inmates per 100,000 U.S. residents.[38][42] For female rates see the table to the right.

You gotta have some basic decency, man. Proving your libtard credentials isn't everything, it helps to at least try passing the smell test in your claims.

Sitnam
07-23-2011, 03:29 PM
To eliminate prison sex abuse, you need lots of money to hire more and better trained personnel, IMHO.
Training is the problem. The Catholic Church mentions this a lot, more donations and they'll have the funds to teach men not to molest boys.

code_grey
07-23-2011, 03:36 PM
In any case, that's patently untrue. African-Americans make up 12% of the US prison population; Afro-Carribeans make up 11% of the UK prison population.
blacks comprise around 15% of UK prison population, although population-wise they are heavily overrepresented. Quoth http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2010/oct/11/black-prison-population-increase-england

The report drew on a 2008 Ministry of Justice document, footnoted as the source of the EHRC statement that stated: "Black prisoners make up 15% of the prisoner population and this compares with 2.2% of the general population – there is greater disproportionality in the number of black people in prisons in the UK than there is in the United States."

Overrepresentation should not be surprising since the immigration there is fairly recent and may have attracted some of the worst dregs of society looking for easy criminal pickings and for welfare state assistance. Then again, Jamaica is no paradise either in terms of crime.

In any event, so what? 15% is not that much in absolute terms, certainly less than American 40%. And lest we forget, black people from the Carribean were less affected by homosexual propaganda. Jamaica, believe it or not, is "the most homophobic place on earth (http://www.time.com/time/world/article/0,8599,1182991,00.html)". That's not to say that allegedly "homophobic" people were never known to commit prison rape, but fundamentally this is a matter of statistics. People who come from cultures that hate sodomy are less likely to engage in it, all else being equal.

tomndebb
07-23-2011, 06:00 PM
. . . your libtard credentials. . .This is not The BBQ Pit. Do not post insults in this forum.

[ /Moderating ]

Really Not All That Bright
07-23-2011, 07:28 PM
You gotta have some basic decency, man. Proving your libtard credentials isn't everything, it helps to at least try passing the smell test in your claims.
And here I thought it was hard to smell through a hood.

G-SE
07-23-2011, 08:31 PM
And here I thought it was hard to smell through a hood.

Great response to someone pointing out your made up numbers. When all else fails...

Really Not All That Bright
07-23-2011, 09:00 PM
Great response to someone pointing out your made up numbers. When all else fails...
I didn't make up the numbers. I did read the wrong number for the US black prison population, from the same Wikipedia page he quoted above:
According to the US Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) non-Hispanic blacks accounted for 39.4% of the total prison and jail population in 2009.[38] According to the 2010 census of the US Census Bureau blacks (including Hispanic blacks) comprised 12.6% of the US population.. I got the UK percentage from here (http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm200405/cmselect/cmhaff/193/19317.htm).

I would have apologized, but if you read all his posts in this thread I'm sure you'll understand why I didn't bother.

AK84
07-24-2011, 02:38 AM
I agree. However, people are getting sentenced to incarceration, not rape, a point that doesn't seem to be getting across. It's the United States, not Pakistan where people do get sentenced to rape.

Please add evidence to support the above assertion.

tomndebb
07-24-2011, 09:26 AM
Great response to someone pointing out your made up numbers. When all else fails...Neither accusations of lying nor your other implied insult are appropriate in this forum.

Really Not All That Bright, your response that GS-E quoted was also out of line for this forum.

Knock it off.


[ /Moderating ]

Really Not All That Bright
07-24-2011, 10:19 AM
Mea culpa.

eddiec3434
07-24-2011, 01:33 PM
Look, that's just prison. Believe me, its not a common occurrence. Prisoners are not just running around raping one another. A certain percentage of those surveyed are, well lets just say "the willing". Out here in So Cal., a rapist or sex offender will not survive very long. Any prisoner known as a rapist will be targeted. Out here, they are kept far from the general population for their own safety. The prisoners themselves take care of any sexual deviants. Prison health care is a bigger problem than this.

ElvisL1ves
07-24-2011, 03:02 PM
Please add evidence to support the above assertion.It was overblown perhaps, but true enough (http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2005/03/05/world/main678317.shtml).

Really Not All That Bright
07-24-2011, 09:06 PM
That story doesn't support the claim AK84 questioned.

Starving Artist
07-25-2011, 06:38 AM
Sure it is. The coercion itself may give rise to another criminal charge, but rape requires force or the threat of force.No, it doesn't. All consensual sex between guards and prisoners is classified as rape because the state presumes the balance of power prevents the "victim" from being able to legally consent. I read just a week or so ago about a female guard who was being charged with rape after having become pregnant as the result of an affair with a male prisoner.

AK84
07-25-2011, 07:50 AM
No, it doesn't. All consensual sex between guards and prisoners is classified as rape because the state presumes the balance of power prevents the "victim" from being able to legally consent. I read just a week or so ago about a female guard who was being charged with rape after having become pregnant as the result of an affair with a male prisoner.
Unless there is a specific statute which so states, I don't think so. Where there is such an imbalance of power between the parties, it may be worth exploring whether the consent could really be said to have been free of coersion and in a case of a goaler and her prisoner trivially easy to prove; but the question is one of fact and evidence; not law.

Really Not All That Bright
07-25-2011, 08:49 AM
No, it doesn't. All consensual sex between guards and prisoners is classified as rape because the state presumes the balance of power prevents the "victim" from being able to legally consent. I read just a week or so ago about a female guard who was being charged with rape after having become pregnant as the result of an affair with a male prisoner.
Then I'm sure you can cite the law which sets forth that presumption?

Little Nemo
07-25-2011, 11:29 AM
Then I'm sure you can cite the law which sets forth that presumption?In New York, it's section 130.05 of the Penal Code ("Sex offenses; lack of consent.")

Really Not All That Bright
07-25-2011, 11:48 AM
Thanks. Are there similar provisions in other states?

Bricker
07-25-2011, 11:58 AM
Thanks. Are there similar provisions in other states?

Va Code 18.2-64.2

Really Not All That Bright
07-25-2011, 12:03 PM
The Virginia statute creates a separate offense, which is what I said would happen. The New York statute does what Starving said.

So I guess we're both right.

ETA: The Florida statute does the same thing as the New York statute, although rape is referred to as sexual battery here... so I should have known better.

AK84
07-25-2011, 01:19 PM
New York
3. A person is deemed incapable of consent when he or she is:
(a) less than seventeen years old; or
(b) mentally disabled; or
(c) mentally incapacitated; or
(d) physically helpless; or
(e) committed to the care and custody of the state department of
correctional services or a hospital, as such term is defined in
subdivision two of section four hundred of the correction law, and the
actor is an employee, not married to such person, who knows or
reasonably should know that such person is committed to the care and
custody of such department or hospital. For purposes of this paragraph,
"employee" means (i) an employee of the state department of correctional
services who performs professional duties in a state correctional
facility consisting of providing custody, medical or mental health
services, counseling services, educational programs, or vocational
training for inmates;


Virginia

18.2-64.2. Carnal knowledge of an inmate, parolee, probationer, detainee or pretrial or posttrial offender; penalty.

An accused shall be guilty of carnal knowledge of an inmate, parolee, probationer, detainee, or pretrial defendant or posttrial offender if he or she is an employee or contractual employee of, or a volunteer with, a state or local correctional facility or regional jail, the Department of Corrections, the Department of Juvenile Justice, a secure facility or detention home, as defined in 16.1-228, a state or local court services unit, as defined in 16.1-235, a local community-based probation services agency or a pretrial services agency; is in a position of authority over the inmate, probationer, parolee, detainee, or a pretrial defendant or posttrial offender; knows that the inmate, probationer, parolee, detainee, or pretrial defendant or posttrial offender is under the jurisdiction of the state or local correctional facility, a regional jail, the Department of Corrections, the Department of Juvenile Justice, a secure facility or detention home, as defined in 16.1-228, a state or local court services unit, as defined in 16.1-235, a local community-based probation services agency, or a pretrial services agency; and carnally knows, without the use of force, threat or intimidation (i) an inmate who has been committed to jail or convicted and sentenced to confinement in a state or local correctional facility or regional jail or (ii) a probationer, parolee, detainee, or a pretrial defendant or posttrial offender under the jurisdiction of the Department of Corrections, the Department of Juvenile Justice, a secure facility or detention home, as defined in 16.1-228, a state or local court services unit, as defined in 16.1-235, a local community-based probation services agency, a pretrial services agency, a local or regional jail for the purposes of imprisonment, a work program or any other parole/probationary or pretrial services program or agency. Such offense is a Class 6 felony.

For the purposes of this section, "carnal knowledge" includes the acts of sexual intercourse, cunnilingus, fellatio, anallingus, anal intercourse and animate or inanimate object sexual penetration.

So looks as if we are all correct.

But, is sex between guards and prisoners in these states such a problem that a statute has to be created rather than simply look at consent as a question of fact at a trial?

Little Nemo
07-25-2011, 01:46 PM
But, is sex between guards and prisoners in these states such a problem that a statute has to be created rather than simply look at consent as a question of fact at a trial?I think it was more of an issue that the state recognized that even consensual sex between a prisoner and an employee was a serious problem.

AK84
07-25-2011, 01:49 PM
Sorry I phrased my statement poorly.What I meant was why did the state feel it necessary to criminalise it wholly, instead of dealing with it through administrative or disciplinaru means?