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denquixote
06-24-2012, 05:42 PM
I just saw Ronnie Spector last night and she was absolutely fantastic, better than I might ever have anticipated. Who is the best rock and roll singer you have ever seen in person? By Rock and Roll I am hoping to limit the range to those who might have started their careers prior to 1970 or have been obviously and strongly influenced by those who have. If there is a better way to describe R & R, other than I know it when I hear it, please describe.

drastic_quench
06-24-2012, 05:54 PM
Never saw in person, but the answer is Freddie Mercury. Everyone else is competing for the #2 spot.

denquixote
06-24-2012, 06:15 PM
I had a feeling this would not work. First of all, the idea is to identify someone you saw, not see who has the best reputation. Second I disagree that Freddie mercury sang R & R. but I guess that is where the debates would begin.

drastic_quench
06-24-2012, 06:19 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zO6D_BAuYCI

Pretty rock n roll. It's not like I don't regret buying tickets.

Mewl Dear
06-24-2012, 06:22 PM
Ian Gillan is by far the best R&R singer I ever saw and I've seen many.

MPB in Salt Lake
06-24-2012, 06:22 PM
Do you want examples of performers who are only vocalists in their respective bands (e.g. Roger Daltry-The Who, Mick Jagger-Rolling Stones, Robert Plant-Led Zeppelin) or would someone who plays an instrument in addition to singing also be eligible for the title?

Either way, Van Morrison has both a voice and a unique vocal style that are legendary, with both his fans and his musical peers alike....

WordMan
06-24-2012, 06:25 PM
I just saw Ronnie Spector last night and she was absolutely fantastic, better than I might ever have anticipated. Who is the best rock and roll singer you have ever seen in person? By Rock and Roll I am hoping to limit the range to those who might have started their careers prior to 1970 or have been obviously and strongly influenced by those who have. If there is a better way to describe R & R, other than I know it when I hear it, please describe.

:: pulls up chair, grabs popcorn::

This may be interesting.

denquixote
06-24-2012, 06:57 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zO6D_BAuYCI

Pretty rock n roll. It's not like I don't regret buying tickets.



Again, I am having trouble. Yes it's a good song. Yes. I would call that particular song R & R. I don't think of Freddy as a R & R singer and that one example has not forced me to change my mind. Also, "it's not like I don't regret buying tickets" is a little hard to decipher. I assume you are voting for Freddy.

Jamicat
06-24-2012, 06:58 PM
Depends on Genra of Rock n Roll you mean...

To name a few...

Before 70's:
(never seen)

Rodger Daltry
Robert Plant

Afterwards:
(seen)

Rob Halford
Dio
Sammy Hagar
Dee Snyder
Blackie Lawless
Pat Benetar
Steve Perry

denquixote
06-24-2012, 07:04 PM
I, apparently am the only person who distinguishes among Rock, Classic Rock and Rock & Roll. However I am more than willing to concede that Rod Stewart, Paul McCartney, Van Morrison, Mick Jagger et al are Rock & Roll singers. Freddy Mercury and Ian Gillian are (IMHO) not.

WordMan
06-24-2012, 07:06 PM
I, apparently am the only person who distinguishes among Rock, Classic Rock and Rock & Roll. However I am more than willing to concede that Rod Stewart, Paul McCartney, Van Morrison, Mick Jagger et al are Rock & Roll singers. Freddy Mercury and Ian Gillian are (IMHO) not.

So far, not interesting - just someone setting their own rules about what is "rock" and expecting others to blindly accept them. Have fun.

Nunzio Tavulari
06-24-2012, 07:08 PM
Ronnie Spector is terrific, but I favor Darlene Love above her. For best though, I pick Elvis Presley. I didn't like his music as much as I appreciated his voice. He was he was fat, stoned and not paying attention when I saw him. But when he was cooking on all burners, he had a great voice that could cover many different styles.

Meatloaf can kick ass on a good night too.

Nunzio Tavulari
06-24-2012, 07:13 PM
So far, not interesting - just someone setting their own rules about what is "rock" and expecting others to blindly accept them. Have fun.He didn't ask for "rock" singers. He asked for Rock & Roll. The difference is as large as between grunge and britpop or dixieland and bop. As I've said in previous posts, the dividing line falls somewhere around 1966.

That said, the OP has some restrictions that are difficult to meet and distinctions haven't been clearly spelled out. I feel that this will be a contentious and short thread.

WordMan
06-24-2012, 07:22 PM
He didn't ask for "rock" singers. He asked for Rock & Roll. The difference is as large as between grunge and britpop or dixieland and bop. As I've said in previous posts, the dividing line falls somewhere around 1966.

That said, the OP has some restrictions that are difficult to meet and distinctions haven't been clearly spelled out. I feel that this will be a contentious and short thread.

We're good on the fact that there's a diff b/t rock 'n roll and rock - in this case, the latter part of your post is my basic point here...

Chefguy
06-24-2012, 07:41 PM
Roy Orbison [end thread].

Jonathan Chance
06-24-2012, 08:01 PM
Gotta admit. It terms of technical ability (and those I've seen) Roy Orbison would be right up there. He really had some pipes.

Though Chuck Berry is a hilariously entertaining rock and roll singer and should be up there. Technically he's nothing special at all...but he brings joy to it.

MPB in Salt Lake
06-24-2012, 08:18 PM
Though Chuck Berry is a hilariously entertaining rock and roll singer and should be up there. Technically he's nothing special at all...but he brings joy to it.

If you think he lights up when playing onstage, you should see his face when he gets a hold of a new batch of photos featuring 12 & 13 year-old girls pissing and shitting on the toilet!!!

TreacherousCretin
06-24-2012, 08:43 PM
Howard Kaylan. Saw him with the Turtles in '68, and with the Flo And Eddie band (after the Zappa years) in '72.

LVBoPeep
06-24-2012, 08:58 PM
Never saw in person, but the answer is Freddie Mercury. Everyone else is competing for the #2 spot.

That was exactly what I came up with. I love Queen but it's no where near my favorite band but there's no question in my mind that Freddie Mercury was THE rock god.

foolsguinea
06-24-2012, 09:08 PM
Wait, so do Paul Rodgers and Robert Plant count, or are they "classic rock" or blues or something?

denquixote
06-24-2012, 09:35 PM
So far, not interesting - just someone setting their own rules about what is "rock" and expecting others to blindly accept them. Have fun.

Actually, about what is R & R. But as I said I am willing to listen to arguments for other definitions.

denquixote
06-24-2012, 09:49 PM
I am inclined to count both Paul Rodgers and Robert Plant as R & R. Hey I am not making any great distinctions here. The question I asked is about the greatest R & R singer you have ever seen. Realizing this distinction might be hard to make in a lot of cases I gave everyone plenty of room. I gave a cutoff date of 1970 unless the work done after that is clearly derivative of those performers who preceded that date. I realize all of the Chess performers such as Chuck Berry, Muddy Waters, Howling Wolf etc. are strictly speaking blues based, but I would include them and any of their followers. I would include the Stray Cats and other derivatives of Rockabilly, or derivatives of Swamp Rock or DooWop or whatever. Too broad? Too narrow? Too uninteresting? Let it die. I was just curious who might have seen whom and who they thought was average, good, great or transcendent.

Ají de Gallina
06-24-2012, 09:57 PM
That was exactly what I came up with. I love Queen but it's no where near my favorite band but there's no question in my mind that Freddie Mercury was THE rock god.

Count me in for Freddy. The motherf-ing range and power are unmatched.

Mixolydian
06-24-2012, 09:57 PM
Van Morrison tops my list too, but here's some more that I've had the pleasure of seeing live not mentioned yet:

Jerry Lee Lewis
Peter Wolf
Southside Johnny
Ray Davies
Chrissie Hynde
Gregg Allman

Fear Itself
06-24-2012, 10:02 PM
Grace Slick.

KarlGauss
06-24-2012, 10:44 PM
I'm kinda partial to Ray Davies (The Kinks) and Eric Burdon (The Animals).

Ray (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nVXmMMSo47s).

Eric (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bwAw9ThDQmk).

E-Sabbath
06-24-2012, 10:52 PM
That I saw live. Hm. Three chords, two fingers, one asshole.
Ladies and gentlemen, Joey Ramone was that asshole.

Now, you may quibble, as he played punk, but the punk he played was rock and roll.

SprungFromCages
06-24-2012, 11:09 PM
I'm going with Bruce Springsteen. Best live show in R&R history, and still going strong.

Who_me?
06-25-2012, 08:03 AM
Never saw in person, but the answer is Freddie Mercury. Everyone else is competing for the #2 spot.

Did see in person, and agree wholeheartedly.

astorian
06-25-2012, 09:12 AM
The best rock and roll singer I ever saw live?

Roy Orbison, at the Austin Aqua Festival, a few months before he died. He looked ridiculous, but hit EVERY high note, and sounded absolutely magnificent.

panache45
06-25-2012, 09:39 AM
Another vote for Freddie Mercury.

koeeoaddi
06-25-2012, 10:08 AM
Stevie Winwood

Typo Negative
06-25-2012, 11:21 AM
Robin Zander of Cheap Trick has always been my favorite.

JohnT
06-25-2012, 11:46 AM
There used to be a time when I would join this thread with great enthusiasm.

... Now I'm reading it and thinking "there's a difference between 'rock' and 'rock and roll'?"

My answer: Bono. Because he doesn't fit anything that the OP wants. :p

TreacherousCretin
06-25-2012, 01:40 PM
I should have known "the greatest" wouldn't be restricted to one choice.
The other two "the greatest rock and roll singer" I saw and heard in person:

John Lennon (with The Beatles, August 1965)
Linda Ronstadt (Stone Poneys, 1967)

Fear Itself
06-25-2012, 01:44 PM
Yeah, Linda Ronstadt is up there. I guess I prefer female voices.

Fiddle Peghead
06-25-2012, 04:35 PM
Bob (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4j7fRJyP7Y8) Dylan (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AgqGUBP3Cx0&feature=artistob&playnext=1&list=TLjqiV_tlABxg).

oreally
06-25-2012, 06:44 PM
I, apparently am the only person who distinguishes among Rock, Classic Rock and Rock & Roll. However I am more than willing to concede that Rod Stewart, Paul McCartney, Van Morrison, Mick Jagger et al are Rock & Roll singers. Freddy Mercury and Ian Gillian are (IMHO) not.

Wow it's refreshing as hell (even shocking) to bump into someone else who gets that "rock" and "rock n roll" are not interchangeable terms.

That said, Van Morrison rock n roll? I think not. And and pretty poor singer overall, actually. That said, I like a lot of his stuff.

Elvis is your winner, closely followed by McCartney, with Bob Seger a respectable third, tied with Rondstadt (who easily wins for female singer).

Really focusing on just "rock n roll singers" narrows it down a lot. Frankly many mentioned don't qualify.

He didn't ask for "rock" singers. He asked for Rock & Roll. The difference is as large as between grunge and britpop or dixieland and bop. As I've said in previous posts, the dividing line falls somewhere around 1966.? Rock n roll is a subset of the broader "rock," which also includes hard rock/metal, soft rock, southern rock, etc etc. Rock n roll didn't "end" in the 60s. Seger in fact is a great example of that.


I am inclined to count both Paul Rodgers and Robert Plant as R & R.
I can't imagine why. Neither were. Also both quite overrated singers IMO. Rodgers can't improvise or carry a note to save his life and Robert "I sing like I took way too much speed" Plant.....puh-leez. Fingernails on a chalkboard.

At least nobody said Neil Young :rolleyes:

Magiver
06-25-2012, 06:54 PM
Roy Orbison is probably the most gifted but Freddy Mercury had so much..... I can't easily put it into words.

Billy Squier has the same qualities as Mercury and reminds me of him in way's I again can't put into words. That would be one hell of a concert.

Fiddle Peghead
06-25-2012, 07:14 PM
Maybe Neil (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FMvjfBdeiKw) Young (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xU5xTHN7VnI) can top Dylan, now that I think of it.

Hilarity N. Suze
06-25-2012, 07:26 PM
There are too many. Just off the top of my head: Michael Hutchence, Freddie Mercury, Paul McCartney (well not lately, but he could rock with the best of 'em), Suzi Quatro (often overlooked!), Janis Joplin. Boy do I wish more people on my list were still alive. But: when they rocked, they ruled.

Fiddle Peghead
06-25-2012, 07:36 PM
Rock n roll is a subset of the broader "rock," which also includes hard rock/metal, soft rock, southern rock, etc etc.

But since a subset is a thing that is part of a bigger group, and since rock n roll contains both rock and roll, doesn't this necessarily mean that rock is a subset of rock n roll, instead of the other way around? :)

denquixote
06-26-2012, 03:33 AM
#42 Yesterday, 05:36 PM
Fiddle Peghead
Guest Join Date: Mar 2001

Quote:
Originally Posted by oreally
Rock n roll is a subset of the broader "rock," which also includes hard rock/metal, soft rock, southern rock, etc etc. "

But since a subset is a thing that is part of a bigger group, and since rock n roll contains both rock and roll, doesn't this necessarily mean that rock is a subset of rock n roll, instead of the other way around?



Actually "Rock" and "Rock & Roll" are both terms of art describing different genres of music. While "R & R" oviously preceded Rock and influenced it in many ways I would argue that neither is a subset of the other. IMHO neither Paul Rodgers, Neil Young, Bob Dylan, Robert Plant or Stevie Winwood are R & R singers, but they all come within the limits I described originally.

Becky2844
06-26-2012, 04:28 AM
Little Richard.

Boyo Jim
06-26-2012, 05:25 AM
There are too many. Just off the top of my head: Michael Hutchence, Freddie Mercury, Paul McCartney (well not lately, but he could rock with the best of 'em), Suzi Quatro (often overlooked!), Janis Joplin. Boy do I wish more people on my list were still alive. But: when they rocked, they ruled.

Thank you for mentioning Janis (not that I've ever seen her in person). She needs to be on the list.

I'm gonna throw in Robert Palmer and Warren Zevon because I think at least some of their music can be squeezed into the R&R category.

oreally
06-26-2012, 07:09 AM
Maybe Neil (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FMvjfBdeiKw) Young (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xU5xTHN7VnI) can top Dylan, now that I think of it.

A (sick) cat in heat can top Dylan. Or Young, for that matter.

Fiddle Peghead
06-26-2012, 08:49 AM
Actually "Rock" and "Rock & Roll" are both terms of art describing different genres of music. While "R & R" oviously preceded Rock and influenced it in many ways I would argue that neither is a subset of the other. IMHO neither Paul Rodgers, Neil Young, Bob Dylan, Robert Plant or Stevie Winwood are R & R singers, but they all come within the limits I described originally.

Truth be told, I really don't think "rock" and "rock-n-roll" have been defined adequately enough here for the discussion to amount to much, so far as the distinction is important in the first place. Yeah, I guess Roger Daltrey sang rock and Chuck Berry sang rock-n-roll, but exactly what is used to classify each in the first place? Good thread, though. It's nice to be reminded of some artists I haven't listened to in a while.

In any case, this discussion reminds me of a funny story. If you remember, back in 1986 Billy Joel was one of the first American rock artists to tour Soviet Russia. On his "Live! Alone in America" LP, Graham Parker at one point says, "I Love America. I wake up every day and say 'Thank God for America.' Imagine being, like a Russian or something, you know, get all that misinformation. They don't give the people the truth at all. I mean, those Russians think that Billy Joel is a rock-n-roll singer."

Fiddle Peghead
06-26-2012, 08:58 AM
A (sick) cat in heat can top Dylan. Or Young, for that matter.

Perhaps. A Rolling Stone magazine critic, it could have been Dave Marsh or Charles M. Young, I really can't remember, pretty much summed it up for me. He wrote, "Bod Dylan doesn't have a great voice. He has a great rock-n-roll voice." Not to get all indignant, but it really baffles the hell out of me that some who profess to love rock, or rock-n-roll, or whatever you want to call it, just cannot see the distinction and why it matters. But that's just me.

phreesh
06-26-2012, 10:52 AM
In the school of Robert Plant, Chris Cornell (Soundgarden, Audioslave, Solo) has an amazing voice (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vVXIK1xCRpY).

Bridget Burke
06-26-2012, 11:05 AM
I'm going with Bruce Springsteen. Best live show in R&R history, and still going strong.

Yup. But I also heard Grace Slick in her prime. And Young Roky Erickson.....

astorian
06-26-2012, 11:56 AM
Perhaps. A Rolling Stone magazine critic, it could have been Dave Marsh or Charles M. Young, I really can't remember, pretty much summed it up for me. He wrote, "Bod Dylan doesn't have a great voice. He has a great rock-n-roll voice." Not to get all indignant, but it really baffles the hell out of me that some who profess to love rock, or rock-n-roll, or whatever you want to call it, just cannot see the distinction and why it matters. But that's just me.

I fully agree that, while Dylan was never a great singer in any conventiona lsense, somehow his voice just... worked, for a long time. He was usually the best interpreter of his own material.

But today? Today, he's not just a bad singer in the conventional sense, he's an atrociously bad singer of his own material.

Thing is, he's STILL writing some very good songs. Now more than ever, he needs to find a latter day equivalent of the Byrds or Peter Paul & Mary... someone who can sing the songs he writes. Because he's AWFUL now.

Not awful compared to Elvis or Sinatra. Awful compared to the Dylan who sang "Isis" and "Sara" back in 1975.

Fiddle Peghead
06-26-2012, 12:26 PM
But today? Today, he's not just a bad singer in the conventional sense, he's an atrociously bad singer of his own material.


The last Dylan album I bought was "Modern Times" from 2006. For me, it has one standout track, "Workingman's Blues #2" and his singing on it, while far removed from the way it was in the 60s-80s, was still perfect for that song. And all of "Love and Theft" was terrific, again with a different style of singing than his prime. I do think that for a while there in the 80s, he seemed to give up trying. I have no opinion past 2006, but I will say that a short snippet I heard from "Together Through Life" wasn't promising.

Wakinyan
06-26-2012, 04:09 PM
I know this isn't exactly an Elvis Presley fan club, but the greatest rock'n'roll singer of all time he was, nonetheless.

Steophan
06-26-2012, 07:12 PM
The last Dylan album I bought was "Modern Times" from 2006. For me, it has one standout track, "Workingman's Blues #2" and his singing on it, while far removed from the way it was in the 60s-80s, was still perfect for that song. And all of "Love and Theft" was terrific, again with a different style of singing than his prime. I do think that for a while there in the 80s, he seemed to give up trying. I have no opinion past 2006, but I will say that a short snippet I heard from "Together Through Life" wasn't promising.

For me, Modern Times is probably one of Dylan's top 5 albums, at least partly for the singing. He's learned better than many people how to use what voice he has effectively. Together Through Life is nothing special, but there's some great stuff from the 90s and 2000s on The Bootleg Series Volume 8 - Tell Tale Signs, including some outtakes from Modern Times if you want to listen further to that era.

ETA On topic for the thread, I wouldn't say Dylan has, or had, a great rock n' roll voice, but a great folk/blues one.

Magiver
06-26-2012, 09:13 PM
I know this isn't exactly an Elvis Presley fan club, but the greatest rock'n'roll singer of all time he was, nonetheless. He was good but I think FM was better. I never really liked him because my musical taste started with the Animals. But I can hear the quality in his voice.

Nunzio Tavulari
06-27-2012, 01:48 AM
ETA On topic for the thread, I wouldn't say Dylan has, or had, a great rock n' roll voice, but a great folk/blues one.I believe that Dylan CAN sing; or at least he once could. But it's not his natural voice and he doesn't want to.

For the Nashville Skyline album, he got, of all people, Tiny Tim to teach him how to croon. If you listen to that album in it's entirety you hear some decent vocals. It's especially evident if you listen to John Wesley Harding before it.

After Nashville, thing got a little confusing. He released the apparent joke album Self Portrait. Neither it nor it's hastily put-together successor New Morning, show may traces of the vocal stylings learned for Nashville Skyline. The Billy The Kid soundtrack and the horribly bad Dylan followed before he got back to releasing usual Dylan album. Those albums lead me to believe that he was experimenting with a new persona and didn't hit upon one that he liked. There was a brief and spectacular comeback with Blood On The Tracks but the quality of his output went steadily downhill until the Nineties.

Sleeps With Butterflies
06-27-2012, 02:20 AM
If you think he lights up when playing onstage, you should see his face when he gets a hold of a new batch of photos featuring 12 & 13 year-old girls pissing and shitting on the toilet!!!

This made me laugh so hard that I'm truly ashamed.

I have no desire to get into a nitpicky argument about what is or isn't rock and break down music into itty bitty categories just to suss out the best singer in every given genre so I will just give some names of some AMAZING singers IMHO. Most of them I haven't seen live (some gone before I was born) so I'm breaking that rule as well.


Freddie Mercury (I will say he's #1)

#2s:
Ann Wilson
Linda Ronstadt
Janis Joplin
Chris Cornell
Elvis Presley
Van Morrison
Stevie Wonder (although I *know* many will say not rock but I can't NOT add him)

Fiddle Peghead
06-27-2012, 09:45 AM
For me, Modern Times is probably one of Dylan's top 5 albums, at least partly for the singing.

Admittedly, I haven't listened to Modern Times nearly as much as my favorite Dylan albums. I'll go back and check it out again.

ETA On topic for the thread, I wouldn't say Dylan has, or had, a great rock n' roll voice, but a great folk/blues one.

As I suggested earlier, I don't really know how to classify one genre from another. I'll just say that whatever genre Dylan belonged to in the 60s to mid 70s, he had a great voice for it, and leave it at that.

Fiddle Peghead
06-27-2012, 09:51 AM
There was a brief and spectacular comeback with Blood On The Tracks but the quality of his output went steadily downhill until the Nineties.

Ah, Blood on the Tracks. Definitely a top Dylan album, with a favorite Dylan vocal on "If You See Her, Say Hello." I wanted to find a link to this from the album for those who aren't familiar with it (and even care), but couldn't. I did find this (http://web1.uct.usm.maine.edu/~rabrams/LakelandHello.html) very interesting version, apparently from Lakeland, FL in 1976, with drastically altered lyrics and somewhat altered vocals. WARNING: Dylan dislikers, equivocators, and downright haters, you probably don't want to hear this. :)

E-Sabbath
06-27-2012, 08:17 PM
I have to further my previous posting of Joey Ramone with saying that I've seen a number of musicians in concert, but the few that could be Rock and Roll, were blues instead.
Somehow, I've managed to miss Jack White repeatedly, and I could never afford Bruce Springsteen tickets.

I've never seen Elvis sing. Buy lotto tickets... maaaaaybe. But not sing.

Hm. But you know, I have seen Carol King. She's right up there.

Cubsfan
06-27-2012, 10:01 PM
I don't think of Freddy as a R & R singer

Huh? Are you serious or are we being whooshed here?

If he's not R&R what do you consider him to be?

denquixote
06-28-2012, 01:29 AM
#61 Today, 08:01 PM
Cubsfan
Guest Join Date: Jul 2002

Quote:
Originally Posted by denquixote
I don't think of Freddy as a R & R singer

Huh? Are you serious or are we being whooshed here?

If he's not R&R what do you consider him to be?"

I would call him rock or hard rock, neither of which I care too much about. There may be a finer distinction.

What would you call Steve Goodman?

denquixote
06-28-2012, 02:00 AM
Freed tells the audience that "rock and roll is a river of music that has absorbed many streams: rhythm and blues, jazz, rag time, cowboy songs, country songs, folk songs. All have contributed to the big beat." Alan Freed in Rock, Rock, Rock


"Rock 'n' roll is really swing with a modern name. It began on the levees and plantations, took in folk songs, and features blues and rhythm. It's the rhythm that gets to the kids — they're starved of music they can dance to, after all those years of crooners."

Alan Freed—NME - February 1956


I am not trying to lay down specific criteria for what is and what is not R & R. It is just like the Supreme Court ruling on obscenity, I know it when I hear it. I thought the guidelines laid down early on gave plenty of leeway but I am starting to think that it is simply a generational thing. To me, R & R is an amalgam of R & B (don't get me started on that one), Blues, Country, Western Swing, traditional Jazz, work songs, string bands, jug bands and probably a host of others that I have forgotten, but I don't hear one single thing in Freddie Mercury and/or Queen which reminds me in any way of any of those types of music. Frankly, I probably should have just limited the category to those singers who had success between 1956 and 1964, but I did not want to eliminate some truly great performers who were strongly influenced by someone who did perform in an influential way during that period. Thus, I say yes to Roert Plant, Joe Cocker, Mick Jagger, David Lindley, Ry Cooder, Bruce Springsteen and a whole host of others. I said no to Steve Winwood, who to me is mostly Jazz but these are all just my opinions. Who do you say is R & R? And why?

In short, what makes Freddy Mercury a R & R singer?

drastic_quench
06-28-2012, 02:40 AM
Their Induction to Rock AND ROLL Hall of Fame?

And yeah, that's a less-than-stellar institution, and other inductees include Grandmaster Flash and Furious Five, Simon and Garfunkel, Al Green, Bee Gees, Leonard Cohen, et al who do not fit your ultra-prescriptivist definition, but so what? What's wrong with being a little broad in our terms? This thread has been a giant bummer and is totally antithetical to the spirit of rock n roll.

I'm off to start a "greatest shoestring" thread and tut and moan that people don't recognize the difference between laces and cords. In conclusion, Freddie Mercury was the best because of aglets.

E-Sabbath
06-28-2012, 09:38 AM
His purpose was sinister?

phungi
06-28-2012, 10:05 AM
If Roger Daltry is a candidate, then Eddie Vedder should be on the list, since he sings Daltry better than Daltry (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d7yEqPMlQH0)

Nunzio Tavulari
06-28-2012, 10:08 AM
Huh? Are you serious or are we being whooshed here?
If he's not R&R what do you consider him to be?I'm thinking Broadway musicals. He would have done well in opera too.

Truman Burbank
06-28-2012, 10:39 AM
Best I've seen, whatever the hell this criteria is, has to be Bruce.
Female, best I never saw, might be Patty Smythe from Scandal.
If we're talking about 'best singing voices', Brian Wilson's gotta be in there somewhere...

Bridget Burke
06-28-2012, 11:31 AM
Their Induction to Rock AND ROLL Hall of Fame?

And yeah, that's a less-than-stellar institution, and other inductees include Grandmaster Flash and Furious Five, Simon and Garfunkel, Al Green, Bee Gees, Leonard Cohen, et al who do not fit your ultra-prescriptivist definition, but so what? What's wrong with being a little broad in our terms? This thread has been a giant bummer and is totally antithetical to the spirit of rock n roll......

Really. I'm an old fart, too. But I don't care for exclusionary categories. I save my energy for still going out to see live music--local & regional stuff more than pricey acts. (Joe King Carrasco at Miller Outdoor Theater this Saturday! As a Texas musician, he's no respecter of borders.)

I didn't name Freddie Mercury because I never saw him live....

Magiver
06-28-2012, 06:13 PM
Ah, Blood on the Tracks. Definitely a top Dylan album, with a favorite Dylan vocal on "If You See Her, Say Hello." I wanted to find a link to this from the album for those who aren't familiar with it (and even care), but couldn't. I did find this (http://web1.uct.usm.maine.edu/~rabrams/LakelandHello.html) very interesting version, apparently from Lakeland, FL in 1976, with drastically altered lyrics and somewhat altered vocals. WARNING: Dylan dislikers, equivocators, and downright haters, you probably don't want to hear this. :) I listened to his album version of the song. I like his song writing skills but he doesn't hold a candle to pretty much everybody else listed in this thread. He's off key a great deal of the time.

Lars Aruns
06-29-2012, 07:48 PM
If we take 1970 as a cutoff date for the start of a singer's career to count, then I'd throw in Greg Lake of Emerson, Lake and Palmer (as well as King Crimson, but only for a couple of albums).

Here's a song I quite like: Take a Pebble (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cPZkivm1xhA&feature=related).

I'd also consider Justin Hayward of the Moody Blues. Here's Question (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NP9iOqdxS8c).

JustinC
06-30-2012, 08:37 AM
If we're allowed to be flexible about what is R&R I'd say
1)Mercury 2) Axl Rose 3)Bono 4)Elvis 5)Robert Plant 6)Ozzy Osbourne

Lochdale
06-30-2012, 08:41 AM
Count me in for Freddy. The motherf-ing range and power are unmatched.

Elvis has him beat in both. I think Freddie said the same thing.

Guy could do gospel, opera, rOck, blues. His live albums are awesome even with all the schmaltz.

Face Intentionally Left Blank
06-30-2012, 10:29 AM
I can't imagine why. Neither were. Also both quite overrated singers IMO. Rodgers can't improvise or carry a note to save his life and Robert "I sing like I took way too much speed" Plant.....puh-leez. Fingernails on a chalkboard.


Never saw Plant. I saw Paul Rodgers with Neal Schon. First time I ever saw a Hendrix cover where the guitar part did the original proud, but a vocal that did not. You would think that Jimi's vocals would be the easier thing to match. I like Rodger's recorded work, but I think he lacks range.

If Meat Loaf qualifies, I guess he's my choice. I've seen many I've loved, but that I wouldn't necessary rank them as top Rock 'n' Roll singers. Ronnie Spector was very good, as was Mary Wilson, but I can't rate them as the best. Flo & Eddie were pretty good, but not THAT good. Crosby Stills and Nash were, well CSN. Awesome, but Rock 'n' Roll? The best female vocalist I ever saw live would probably be kd lang, but again, not Rock 'n' Roll. Joe Cocker was great, and might rate near the top. Roger Daltrey, in his prime, might have been my choice, but I never saw him live. :(

I really miss going to concerts. Thank Og for Youtube. The Prince's Trust concerts & Rockpalast are a treasure-trove of live music.

Lochdale
06-30-2012, 10:46 AM
It all depends on what your criteria is for a good singer. Many of the singers mentioned in this thread are atrocious live. Presley and Mercury (and Orbison) were excellent live. I go with Presley due to his range. He could sing anything.

Meatloaf is a lot of fun but he is hit or miss live and actually fairly limited. I've seen him in concert many times and I always enjoy it.

pulykamell
06-30-2012, 10:47 AM
If we're going to differentiate finely between "rock" and "rock & roll," then my vote goes to Elvis. Otherwise, Freddy Mercury.

DonLogan
06-30-2012, 11:48 AM
I had a feeling this would not work. First of all, the idea is to identify someone you saw, not see who has the best reputation. Second I disagree that Freddie mercury sang R & R. but I guess that is where the debates would begin.

Make a list of eligible singers and put it up as a poll.

BrotherCadfael
06-30-2012, 01:16 PM
I think I'd call everything prior to the British Invasion as Rock & Roll, and everything after as Rock. The British Invasion itself was neither one nor the other - or perhaps a bit of both.

Quintas
06-30-2012, 01:26 PM
I am hoping to limit the range to those who might have started their careers prior to 1970

:rolleyes: