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View Full Version : So, how does A.L. Vampire Hunter go over in the South?


BlinkingDuck
06-24-2012, 06:13 PM
Was dragged to this movie by the kids and just got out of it.

Better than I thought it would be but still not the best film of the decade or even the last 2 days :). Editors should definitely be shot.

I was thinking while watching it...I wonder how this movie is going over in parts of the South? :D

Jonathan Chance
06-24-2012, 08:02 PM
South Carolina here. Theater was packed when I saw it this weekend.

Sampiro
06-24-2012, 08:32 PM
Alabama here. Went over like most other mediocre popcorn movies I've been to; I don't think anybody was particularly offended. (It's steampunk Abe Lincoln jumping on the backs of moving horses and killing vampires, for Og sake, I don't think anybody's going to think they're going for realism.)

Ephemera
06-24-2012, 08:35 PM
Tennessee here. I've not seen it yet, but I plan to, and most of my friends seem pretty interested as well.

AncientHumanoid
06-24-2012, 08:36 PM
My family vampires fought for state's rights, not for full blooded slaves!

Sampiro
06-24-2012, 08:37 PM
My family vampires fought for state's rights, not for full blooded slaves!

Hemoglobin, not hate!

Tess Trueheart
06-25-2012, 01:38 AM
Texan here. Friends seem excited about the movie. The drive-in was plenty full for this screen (and AL was the first movie of the double feature). I haven't heard anybody offended by anything except... Well, plenty of people take offense/roll their eyes at the entire premise. Not as Southerners, as people who don't believe in vampires!

madsircool
06-25-2012, 01:52 AM
Its the predictable Northern reaction to 'Jefferson Davis:Witchfinder'

grude
06-25-2012, 01:52 AM
Texan here. Friends seem excited about the movie. The drive-in was plenty full for this screen (and AL was the first movie of the double feature). I haven't heard anybody offended by anything except... Well, plenty of people take offense/roll their eyes at the entire premise. Not as Southerners, as people who don't believe in vampires!

As a former Houston resident........if the classic South Will Rise Again sentiment even present in Texas as a whole? Shit a lot of the kids I went to school with were the children of immigrants.

Bridget Burke
06-25-2012, 07:19 AM
Current Houston resident here: Nope.

Houston is full of immigrants--from places like New York City, Los Angeles, Mexico City, Lagos, Saigon, Bombay, etc. The very oldest Houston money came from cotton--but Big Oil made the city what it is. Slavery was illegal under Mexican rule, so the dreadful institution only took root on Texas soil in the years between Texas Independence (1836) & Juneteenth (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Juneteenth)--1865.

There are some Old Confederates in Texas, but they are outnumbered*. Especially in the cities. (In San Antonio, even more so--since neither the Mexicans nor most of the Germans held with slavery.)

* Even the serious nutcases fantasize about seceding to make an Independent Texas, not to join a reborn Confederacy. Texas chauvinism prevented the Lone Star flag from ever being besmirched with Confederate imagery.

Eve
06-25-2012, 09:28 AM
Well, it should make Finding Your Roots more interesting.

Henry Louis Gates: "Gwyneth Paltrow, your great-great-grandfather sucked my great-great-grandfather's blood!!"
[Gwynnie breaks down in tears]

etv78
06-25-2012, 09:31 AM
Current Houston resident here: Nope.

Houston is full of immigrants--from places like New York City, Los Angeles, Mexico City, Lagos, Saigon, Bombay, etc. The very oldest Houston money came from cotton--but Big Oil made the city what it is. Slavery was illegal under Mexican rule, so the dreadful institution only took root on Texas soil in the years between Texas Independence (1836) & Juneteenth (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Juneteenth)--1865.

There are some Old Confederates in Texas, but they are outnumbered*. Especially in the cities. (In San Antonio, even more so--since neither the Mexicans nor most of the Germans held with slavery.)

* Even the serious nutcases fantasize about seceding to make an Independent Texas, not to join a reborn Confederacy. Texas chauvinism prevented the Lone Star flag from ever being besmirched with Confederate imagery.

Also: Austin is one of two CSA state capitals to never fall into Union hands. (Tallahassee)

control-z
07-03-2012, 01:43 PM
I don't think there is any particular dislike of Lincoln in the South, just some of his generals that laid waste to farms and houses.

Shagnasty
07-03-2012, 01:59 PM
I don't think there is any particular dislike of Lincoln in the South, just some of his generals that laid waste to farms and houses.

William Tecumseh Sherman in particular. I was appalled that he lived in Louisiana just before the Civil War and was one of the founders of Louisiana State University (LSU). Growing up in the Deep South, we were never taught anything bad about Abraham Lincoln in particular. He was always noted as one of the most respected Presidents. Abe doesn't have a bad name in the South and I don't know if he ever did.

RickJay
07-03-2012, 02:50 PM
William Tecumseh Sherman in particular. I was appalled that he lived in Louisiana just before the Civil War and was one of the founders of Louisiana State University (LSU).
Of course, he didn't fight in Louisiana.

carnivorousplant
07-03-2012, 03:05 PM
Also: Austin is one of two CSA state capitals to never fall into Union hands. (Tallahassee)

Lucky Texicans...

Sampiro
07-03-2012, 03:15 PM
William Tecumseh Sherman in particular. I was appalled that he lived in Louisiana just before the Civil War and was one of the founders of Louisiana State University (LSU). Growing up in the Deep South, we were never taught anything bad about Abraham Lincoln in particular. He was always noted as one of the most respected Presidents. Abe doesn't have a bad name in the South and I don't know if he ever did.

I was in elementary school in Alabama in the 1970s and same story here. People have been surprised to hear that we're taught the same things everybody else is taught (the "born in a one room log cabin that he built himself and crossed the continent to return a book" stuff).

billfish678
07-03-2012, 03:35 PM
As another person born and raised in the deep south and educated back when racism, if not still all the rage, was still pretty durn alive...I can say when it came to edumacation about Ole Abe it was pretty much on the positive side.

If these directors wanna really clean up here in the deep south they need a sequel. Abe Lincoln, Pioneer of NASCAR (the ancestory story of Ricky Bobby), Episode 3.

BigT
07-03-2012, 04:18 PM
I was in elementary school in Alabama in the 1970s and same story here. People have been surprised to hear that we're taught the same things everybody else is taught (the "born in a one room log cabin that he built himself and crossed the continent to return a book" stuff).

People are even surprised it was taught here in Arkansas. And, really, only only our southern half went with the Confederacy--it's just the most populated. The northern half didn't give a crap, as there's no farmland up here in the "mountains."

(Funny how things flipped, with the north having the KKK capital and the south being so integrated.)

carnivorousplant
07-03-2012, 04:25 PM
The northern half didn't give a crap, as there's no farmland up here in the "mountains."



Hell, Arkansas didn't secede until the Feds asked for a draft of 500 men to go kill their neighbors in Tennessee and Louisiana.

But I digress. :)

thelurkinghorror
07-03-2012, 04:40 PM
Also: Austin is one of two CSA state capitals to never fall into Union hands. (Tallahassee)

Contrary to popular belief, Austin never sided with the Confederates. It's just that gray was a very ironic color at the time.

(Funny how things flipped, with the north having the KKK capital and the south being so integrated.)

And of course, the Klan was most successful in the Deep South state of... Indiana!?

carnivorousplant
07-03-2012, 05:33 PM
And of course, the Klan was most successful in the Deep South state of... Indiana!?

They ran some county governments in Maine in the 1920's.