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cornopean
01-25-2014, 06:08 PM
Do any of you people put that shrinking plastic film over your windows for better insulating? Then you use your hairdryer to get it stretched tight. I was just wondering.....how much it really helps. Is it worth it? It is a lot of trouble it seems to me.

saje
01-25-2014, 06:20 PM
When I lived in a drafty old house in Maine we did the window film thing, but not the kind that shrinks taut (supposedly) with a hair dryer. We would get cheap strips of lath and use that to tack the plastic to the outside of the house. In the really out-of-plumb room with the oldest windows we did it inside too. Not pretty, but amazingly effective. It didn't do much for radiant cold, but just closing off the drafts was a HUGE improvement. A little air seepage in one area doesn't seem bad, but multiply that by a houseful of windows and doors and a house can get really cold really quickly when the woodstove goes out!

Joey P
01-25-2014, 06:27 PM
A little air seepage in one area doesn't seem bad, but multiply that by a houseful of windows and doors and a house can get really cold really quickly when the woodstove goes out!

I remember hearing something along the lines of (paraphrasing the math, but it gets the point across) "If you have 12 drafty windows and 2 drafty doors, it's the equivalent of having one window open a half an inch all year round". Makes sense when you think about it. Open a window a crack on a windy day and see how much air comes in. That's a lot of air, just don't notice it when it's dispersed throughout the house. Don't forget, it's happens in winter too, but no one feels a warm draft on the back of their neck.

usedtobe
01-25-2014, 06:36 PM
Whether it shrinks or not, any airtight film will do wonders if, and only if, the windows leak air. If the windows are air-tight, it is a waste of time. Saran (tm) wrap would work - the idea is air-tight, not necessarily pretty - if "pretty" is important, the heat-shrinnk might be worth the extra time.
The important part is NOT the shrink - it is the edge tacked down enough that air can't get past.

Before going to the trouble of film, look at the window and see if you caqna seal it using a caulk gun - it the trim (interior or exterior has pulled away from the wall, air can seep aorund the window. If this is what the problem is, the film (usually applied to the trim) will do nothing - you will need to either seal the gap or apply the film around the trim.

bob++
01-25-2014, 06:38 PM
When we bought our house in the 80s, it was double glazed except for a fairly big window on a landing half way up the stairs. On a cold day, if you sat on the bottom step, you could feel the cold air flowing down.

I bought this shrink film and stuck it on. It was tricky to get right, but I took the time and did a pretty good job with double sided tape all round and a hair dryer to shrink it. I also put some silica gel at the bottom to absorb any moisture that got trapped. It worked a treat and the bottom step is toasty warm these days.

From memory, the package said that it should be good for two or three years. That was twenty years ago and it is still there. The colour of the wood frame is not a match these days, but I can live with that.

I also put an old duvet over the trap door to the loft to stop the cold air coming down through the joins.

Joey P
01-25-2014, 06:46 PM
Whether it shrinks or not, any airtight film will do wonders if, and only if, the windows leak air. If the windows are air-tight, it is a waste of time. Saran (tm) wrap would work - the idea is air-tight, not necessarily pretty - if "pretty" is important, the heat-shrinnk might be worth the extra time.
The important part is NOT the shrink - it is the edge tacked down enough that air can't get past.

Before going to the trouble of film, look at the window and see if you caqna seal it using a caulk gun - it the trim (interior or exterior has pulled away from the wall, air can seep aorund the window. If this is what the problem is, the film (usually applied to the trim) will do nothing - you will need to either seal the gap or apply the film around the trim.

That's not true, if the windows are drafty it'll help stop the draft and that'll make a world of difference, yes, that part is true. If the windows are not drafty it'll create a layer of insulation to stop cold air from conevecting through the glass. This is the reason we have double and triple pane windows. You get a layer of air trapped in the middle and the suddenly the heat from outside (in summer) or inside (in winter) has a harder time moving to the other side.

wheresmymind
01-25-2014, 06:57 PM
Did this in a drafty house I lived in during grad school (well, my housemate did anyway). As others have said it did do wonders in cutting down on drafts. Keeping it taught isn't purely aesthetic though: if it's too loose and the window is really drafty, the plastic can act like a diaphragm, "breathing" in and out on gusty days. This creates an annoying noise and I believe it puts more strain on the tape sealing the edges, necessitating the occasional touch-up.

ZipperJJ
01-25-2014, 07:08 PM
Oh man, I finally got around to doing this on my big picture window and it totally makes a difference. Previously you could feel the draft on your neck when sitting on the couch in front of the window. Now, nothing!

I've got the same brand/style of window here in my home office as I do in the front room, and I didn't put plastic on it. It's in the single digits here in Cleveland and windy as hell, and I feel the cold air blasting through the office window.

It took me under an hour to do one huge window (65" x 90") with 3 sections, by myself with a crummy hair dryer. Considering the temps this winter, I think it's worth it.

Smeghead
01-25-2014, 09:00 PM
I attempted it for the first time this winter in our bedroom, where we have two largish drafty windows. I used a storebought kit that came with tape and everything. It was actually quite quick and easy to set up. It took me maybe 40 minutes to do both windows. I haven't noticed a gigantic difference, but I think it's made some. Our room used to be noticeably colder than the hallway when we walked in. Now it feels about the same as the rest of the house.

ThelmaLou
01-25-2014, 09:04 PM
I read somewhere recently that rather than plastic wrap, use bubble wrap. Not on major picture windows, obviously, but on out of the way windows or windows that have drapes or blinds anyway. The article said you don't have to use any adhesive, just spray the bubble wrap with water and it will stick to the window. The article said that some furniture stores will give away big sheets of the stuff that their products come wrapped in. Very clever.

pabstist
01-25-2014, 09:43 PM
We have a sunporch with 2 walls of continuous window panes. I put the plastic wrap over all, except for the last 2 foot section.

The ones covered in plastic do not ice over or even get frosty. The section I didn't cover ices over constantly.

So, I guess it does make a difference! There are no drafts to stop, but the layer of trapped air helps stop the cold air from coming inside.

boytyperanma
01-25-2014, 09:47 PM
I use plastic on my windows. I'm living in a house from the built circa 1730. I tend to leave my curtains closed during the winter as well so it doesn't much matter what plastic I use. The shrink wrap kits go on clearance in the spring so I tend to buy them then making them one of the cheapest and most convenient options because they include the tape. They work best for stopping drafts. I only hit some of them with a hair dryer to smooth them out, on particularly drafty windows the plastic makes noise otherwise.

needscoffee
01-25-2014, 10:08 PM
I lived in a rental house where when it got too cold out the first winter, the baseboard heaters would not cycle off. Alarmed, I put plastic sheeting over the front picture window (with single-pane glass). When I came back indoors after staple-gunning the sheeting up, the heater had already shut off.

Cat Whisperer
01-25-2014, 10:41 PM
I've used the shrink-wrap stuff in the past, and I found that it made a big difference.

Chronos
01-25-2014, 10:44 PM
Bubble wrap probably would work somewhat better than plain plastic, but you don't want to stick it directly to the glass. The whole point is to have multiple layers with an air gap in between.

handsomeharry
01-25-2014, 11:22 PM
When I lived in a drafty old house in Maine we did the window film thing, but not the kind that shrinks taut (supposedly) with a hair dryer. We would get cheap strips of lath and use that to tack the plastic to the outside of the house. In the really out-of-plumb room with the oldest windows we did it inside too. Not pretty, but amazingly effective. It didn't do much for radiant cold, but just closing off the drafts was a HUGE improvement. A little air seepage in one area doesn't seem bad, but multiply that by a houseful of windows and doors and a house can get really cold really quickly when the woodstove goes out!

This here.
I lived in a house about 15 years ago, and I decided to do put up regular plastic sheeting to cover the inside window. I covered around the window frame, tho, not just the glass. I wasn't too careful to make it tight, I just wanted the breezes to be stopped. The result was amazing! When the winds outside were something like 20-30 mph, the plastic was stretched like a sail, and it was as firm to the touch as a basketball! It was phenomenal to realize how much air had been coming in.
As a result, the house was burning up in the winter, and cool as ice cream in the summer, and the heating and cooling bill dropped dramatically. The drapes covered the plastic, until the N wind came thru!

Colibri
01-25-2014, 11:28 PM
Since the OP is looking for opinions, let's move this to IMHO.

Colibri
General Questions Moderator

ThelmaLou
01-25-2014, 11:41 PM
Bubble wrap probably would work somewhat better than plain plastic, but you don't want to stick it directly to the glass. The whole point is to have multiple layers with an air gap in between.

The point is that bubble wrap has built-in air gaps of its own.

Chronos
01-26-2014, 06:30 PM
It has air gaps over a portion of its area, but not all of it. Call it an extra half-layer.

johnpost
01-26-2014, 06:55 PM
even if the window is not drafty it adds another insulating layer.

sit near a window, you can feel that side of your body being cooler because of heat loss. the film reduces that.

hold the back of your hand below a window. you can feel cold air flowing and sinking to the floor.

a large picture windows will have no storm windows. even double or triple pane the film will add another layer.

the film helps you reduce heat loss and have more comfortable living space near your windows. well worth the cost and effort if you live in a serious cold winter area.

cornopean
01-27-2014, 05:19 AM
I just wonder if it is worth the cost. The kit costs around $10-15 per kit. Multiply that by the number of windows you have. That is quite a lot of cost adding up.

saje
01-27-2014, 06:14 AM
Depends on what your local cost of electricity/propane/fuel oil/wood is, and how efficient your heating system is. Small baseboard heaters in an area with high electricity costs and a house with lots of windows? I bet you'd save a chunk.

kittenblue
01-27-2014, 07:13 AM
The kit I bought yesterday (influenced completely by this thread) was $4.98 and is a 3-pack. I think the 9-pack was $14. That's just the standard weight for standard windows (sheets are 42x62). I've only done one kitchen window, the one I sit by, and I've already noticed a difference. And today the wind is just howling!

Cheesesteak
01-27-2014, 07:14 AM
For $15, you can get a 9 pack of Frost King window sheeting at Home Depot. Each sheet is big enough to cover any non-picture window. For picture windows $15 gets you a 2 pack.

Unless you live in Versailles, you should be able to cover every window in your house for $50.

Make sure to clean the window very well before sticking the tape down. Try not to place it in a way that pulls upward on the tape, try to have it flush so it pulls sideways.

BobLibDem
01-27-2014, 07:42 AM
I'm in the minority, I've found the film to be a hassle and not worth it. If you have any blinds or drapes that are close enough to the window, they'll quickly tear it and ruin your work.

ratatoskK
01-27-2014, 07:54 AM
I used the shrink-wrap stuff long ago when I was renting, and it was fantastic, very effective.

Joey P
01-27-2014, 08:17 AM
I just wonder if it is worth the cost. The kit costs around $10-15 per kit. Multiply that by the number of windows you have. That is quite a lot of cost adding up.

The kits do more then one window.

Also, if you're putting them in a room that doesn't get much use or on a window that'll never get opened, you can just leave them on in summer as well. I've done that. That makes them cost even less and it'll keep your AC cost down as well.

harmonicamoon
01-27-2014, 08:50 AM
We cut 1 inch wide cardboard strips, and using a staple gun nailed the plastic to the wood frame windows. You could buy the plastic in 8 or 12 foot widths. My neighbors enclosed their south facing porch. You could go out on the porch in the middle of winter with just shorts and a tee shirt.

Ferret Herder
01-27-2014, 08:57 AM
For $15, you can get a 9 pack of Frost King window sheeting at Home Depot. Each sheet is big enough to cover any non-picture window. For picture windows $15 gets you a 2 pack.

Any good tape recommendations? I'm wary of damaging the woodwork in this rental.

Cheesesteak
01-27-2014, 09:25 AM
The packs come with double stick tape. Unfortunately, damaging woodwork is a risk for this type of operation. You're either going to use tape or staples, and either can be a problem.

I don't know if you can protect the wood with low tack masking tape, but even those can be a problem when you leave them up for a few months.

johnpost
01-27-2014, 10:11 AM
if you don't want to do the whole house then don't. if it's drafty then the whole house would be worth it. you will have to figure on your heating costs.

it is useful in rooms that you spend a lot of time in where you aren't moving around (thus keeping warm) or otherwise insulated (in bed under blankets); so a room where you would sit you would gain comfort benefit in.

in the long term insulation and/or tightening (preventing air infiltration) is the best money you will spend for cutting living costs.

RealityChuck
01-27-2014, 10:44 AM
I use it every year on my windows. You can tell the difference: you can feel the air getting through the triple tracks (they're old) when there's no plastic; when they're up, you can't.

They also supply a little R value -- not the plastic so much as the air space between the plastic and the glass.

I use the outside version, though they are getting harder to find. They don't interfere with the shades and the cat isn't going to puncture them.

Enright3
01-27-2014, 10:47 AM
I just wonder if it is worth the cost. The kit costs around $10-15 per kit. Multiply that by the number of windows you have. That is quite a lot of cost adding up.

Personally I think that's flawed logic. There IS a cost beyond pure dollars that you have to consider. Why not just turn off your heater completely? You'd get really cold, but look at the money you're saving! The answer is because there's value in living in a home that is comfortable.

If you want to see if it's "worth the cost" you should look at as a comparison to what you're trying to gain. For example, is it worth the cost when comparing it to replacing the windows, which may cost you several thousand dollars? Are you reasonable comfortable in your home now? Then you're right, maybe it's not worth it to you.

Enright3
01-27-2014, 10:55 AM
Oh, and to actually answer the OP's question. I personally found them to be of tremendous value in regulating the temperature of my home. I had gigantic sliding glass door in my basement* that had a slight air leak. And by "slight" I mean, that although I couldn't see any gaps, the plastic wouldn't stay taped shut because of the volume of air whooshing into my house. I'd get three sides taped down and it was like funneling all of the air into the remaining corner like a jet stream! I finally got it sealed, and it made a huge difference. Also, like papstist said above. When I covered my daughters windows in her corner bedroom with windows on two sides that took care of the frost problem. Before that her bedroom was always ice cold and the windows would ice over.

*I know it sounds weird to have a sliding door in a basement, so if that didn't make sense, it's because my house was built into a hill where you walked into the house on the first floor, but had to walk out of the back of the house from the basement.

Dangerosa
01-27-2014, 12:05 PM
We have a sunporch with 2 walls of continuous window panes. I put the plastic wrap over all, except for the last 2 foot section.

The ones covered in plastic do not ice over or even get frosty. The section I didn't cover ices over constantly.

So, I guess it does make a difference! There are no drafts to stop, but the layer of trapped air helps stop the cold air from coming inside.

I do it on my sliding glass door for that reason - its double pane and a newer window - but it still gets really cold even without drafts. The warm humid air inside the house condenses on the window, freezes, and as it warms up, melts - and there is a wood floor underneath. Putting the film over the sliding glass door minimizes this (there is still a little - but is sixteen below today and it the aluminum frame, not the glass, that is the issue now.)

In my old drafty turn of the century house with single pane windows, it was completely necessary on every window.

ethelbert
01-27-2014, 12:12 PM
I have used them and they work well, but you might first spend some time with weather stripping. One thing that is almost always useful in an old house is to reglaze the windows, especially if you can do it yourself. Another thing to try is plugging all the cracks around the window with a clay like weatherstripping that does not harden (you can remove it in the spring).

Vita Beata
01-27-2014, 12:20 PM
Our friend helping us in WI put them on select windows; it helped greatly! He began using the 3M product and then purchased another brand on sale. The sale brand tape lost its sticking power through last winter, with the film coming undone. This year we used only the original 3M product.
We left the film up over the summer on a few of the unused bedrooms. We found a large quantity of red asian beetles (ladybugs?) dead in the airspace between window and film.
I think we're going to have to find the clay-like weatherstripping as mentioned by ethelbert.

johnpost
01-27-2014, 12:48 PM
Mortite is the major brand of the weather stripping putty.

Vita Beata
01-27-2014, 12:57 PM
Thanks very much for the "Mortite" name, Johnpost.

papergirl
01-29-2014, 12:16 PM
I don't use the shrinking kind. In the same aisle at my local Menard's, I buy a big roll of heavy plastic sheeting and a roll of tape designed to work with it. I cut it to fit around the windows, tape it up, and take it down in the spring. I don't know if it's more or less expensive, and now I wonder if there is a difference in effectiveness. But it's quick and simple and makes a huge difference.
And when a big ice storm is coming, I tuck a sheet of the plastic across my windshield and under each door frame. In the morning I can open the car door, give the plastic a shake, and my windshield is clear!

InternetLegend
01-29-2014, 11:56 PM
The packs come with double stick tape. Unfortunately, damaging woodwork is a risk for this type of operation. You're either going to use tape or staples, and either can be a problem.

I don't know if you can protect the wood with low tack masking tape, but even those can be a problem when you leave them up for a few months.You do have to be careful. We left the plastic on an upstairs window in an infrequently used room for three years, and I ended up having to sand the window frame to get the adhesive residue off after we replaced the window. We cut 1 inch wide cardboard strips, and using a staple gun nailed the plastic to the wood frame windows. You could buy the plastic in 8 or 12 foot widths. My neighbors enclosed their south facing porch. You could go out on the porch in the middle of winter with just shorts and a tee shirt.This was our solution for a gigantic front window that was really difficult to apply tape and plastic to, and it worked really well. The only difficulty with this was finding a place to store it.

If you want to see if it's "worth the cost" you should look at as a comparison to what you're trying to gain. For example, is it worth the cost when comparing it to replacing the windows, which may cost you several thousand dollars? Are you reasonable comfortable in your home now? Then you're right, maybe it's not worth it to you.After using the plastic on our windows for years, we finally decided to take the plunge and replace our many drafty windows with new double-pane models. Even though we didn't buy the top-of-the-line windows, they cost an arm and a leg - we replaced seven windows, and the total came to almost $6,000. Our cost may be higher than most, because four windows were really large and one was an ancient model with a metal frame that had to be ripped out of the wall and reframed with wood. Although I'm very happy with the new windows, and they're probably more energy-efficient than the plastic, that amount would have paid for decades worth of window kits and slightly higher energy costs if we were just considering the money.

Tastes of Chocolate
01-30-2014, 05:45 PM
My house is 45 years old with single pane glass, and we live in Minnesota, a cold climate.
Because the previous owners did a crappy job of painting latex paint over smoothly varnished wood window trim, we have decided not to use the double sided sticky tape; it pulls off the paint.

Instead, we have applied a plastic cover to the screen window inserts. It's not perfect, the screen fittings aren't air-tight, but it does create a still air pocket the glass and the screen. In our bedroom, where we keep the heating vents closed, applying plastic film to the windows keeps the bedroom maybe 5° warmer. If imperfectly sealed plastic film will do that, then yes, it's well worth, dollar wise, what we pay on the film kits.

Cat Whisperer
01-30-2014, 08:26 PM
Another data point - we're repainting the whole upstairs in our house, so I had to remove the film that I had left on a window for a couple of years now. The tape removal was actually surprisingly good - the tape came off very easily with no residue left behind on the paint. Only one small piece of paint was pulled off; another larger chunk was pulled off, but that was actually a good thing, because it exposed an area that hadn't been fixed properly, so we ripped that whole corner out and are re-fixing it.

Little Nemo
01-30-2014, 10:24 PM
If the windows are air-tight, it is a waste of time.Not necessarily. You can lose heat through the glass as well as through an open seam. The basic rule of thumb is to touch the glass from inside your house - if it feels cool then you're losing heat through it.

Duke of York
02-01-2014, 08:35 PM
I notice not many people mention curtains. Although the lowest temperature I have to put up with is only about 10c, I have heavy curtains which stop cold entering the room via the windows and during the 42c days in summer they keep the heat away too.
Is it because the really extreme cold still gets in past curtains? I notice in American movies they don't have curtains on windows, enabling the local serial killer the opportunity to watch his victim from the street. This is information I have obtained from watching "Criminal minds" so may not be an accurate perception. So the question is, are curtains not enough protection from the extreme cold?

Cat Whisperer
02-01-2014, 11:56 PM
Nope, they aren't. A cold draft (which is what is stopped by the stretched plastic film) still gets in and makes a room cold.

I guess they would help a bit - we don't really have heavy drapes on any of our windows. It could be a chicken and egg kind of thing here - we have good insulation and good windows in houses, engineered for -40ēC temps, so we don't need to put heavy drapes up.

Dangerosa
02-02-2014, 09:12 AM
I also do curtains. But heavy drapes are pretty expensive. The basement gets sheets of fleece tacked over its windows (its an unfinished basement). Most of my windows have blinds, which help too. But the nice thing about the plastic is that you get the light, the view, and the solar heat, but the insulating layer keeps the cold at bay. In Minnesota you don't get much natural light in the winter - keeping the drapes closed can create suicidal tendencies. :)

salinqmind
10-07-2014, 11:59 AM
I think I will have to do this over some windows pretty soon. I've watched a video or two of someone working with Frost King plastic, cutting a big sheet and sticking it on to the double sided tape. But I do have a question: When sealing with the hair dryer, do I aim it all around the frame? Do I also move the hair dryer across the window itself? Do the whole window or just a big 'X'? It seems a little unclear.

babygoat666
10-07-2014, 12:13 PM
Last year, my wife discovered that there is such a thing as thermal curtains (http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=thermal%20curtains). They're actually pretty effective, and a lot nicer to deal with and look at than the plastic.

Dangerosa
10-07-2014, 12:54 PM
Last year, my wife discovered that there is such a thing as thermal curtains (http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=thermal%20curtains). They're actually pretty effective, and a lot nicer to deal with and look at than the plastic.

I have those - they create those suicidal tendencies in Minnesota where you don't get enough natural light in December and January to start with - closing drapes does NOT help with that mid-winter emotional blech.

But they are great once the sun goes down to add another layer of insulation against 16 below.

Anita Dayoff
10-07-2014, 01:59 PM
Seal n Peel is Daps tradename. Used plastic and Mortite in various houses and this stuff is much better for drafty windows. Stops all drafts, goes on easily and I've never seen it damage any surface. In the spring it pulls off as a water clear rubber band (kind of fun). It seals so well that you can hear an acoustic difference in the room. A little pricier than regular caulk but Well worth it.
http://www.acehardware.com/product/index.jsp?productId=3440730

Folacin
10-07-2014, 02:31 PM
I think I will have to do this over some windows pretty soon. I've watched a video or two of someone working with Frost King plastic, cutting a big sheet and sticking it on to the double sided tape. But I do have a question: When sealing with the hair dryer, do I aim it all around the frame? Do I also move the hair dryer across the window itself? Do the whole window or just a big 'X'? It seems a little unclear.

I start in a corner and work out. For the 3M product, you end up doing pretty much the whole window, and I sometimes end up playing "chase the crease", as heat shrinking one area would cause a crease/wrinkle nearby.

swampspruce
10-07-2014, 05:40 PM
I live in N.Alberta and even though my house was built within the last ten years and has decent windows and double panes on the french doors out back I still use plastic on the windows and back door to the deck because it really works! For those of you with tape issues, try heating the tape gently with a heat gun/hair dryer before trying to pull it off. Goo gone (http://googone.com/Home.aspx) works well but make sure it doesn't pull your paint or finish as well.

usedtobe
10-08-2014, 03:02 AM
tl;dr


A sheet of plastic over a single-paned window is NOT the same as a double-paned (at least a decent, modern one); a double-pane has a vacuum between the panes - a sheet of DIY plastic does not - as stated, it will block direct draft, but it is not the same R value of a double-paned.

salinqmind
10-08-2014, 09:16 AM
The instructions say point the hair dryer at 'the wrinkles' - do I pass the hair dryer all around the edges where the film is on the tape? Do I pass the hair dryer on the film on the entire window so it's clinging tight to the window, or just the wrinkles?Do I do it in a big 'x'? (am I putting this the right way? basically, what is it you do with the hair dryer after you attach the film to the tape?)

Dangerosa
10-08-2014, 09:35 AM
tl;dr


A sheet of plastic over a single-paned window is NOT the same as a double-paned (at least a decent, modern one); a double-pane has a vacuum between the panes - a sheet of DIY plastic does not - as stated, it will block direct draft, but it is not the same R value of a double-paned.

Obviously not. But any layer of insulation can be helpful even if it isn't a vaccuum, even just an extra layer of air - and replacing old or drafty windows with can be expensive. With single pane windows, a layer of plastic AND thermal drapes - you might just manage to keep from spending a gazillion dollars heating your house - without spending a gazillion dollars on new windows.

Cheesesteak
10-08-2014, 09:38 AM
It should not cling tight to the window. It should be attached to the window frame, giving you an inch or two space between the plastic sheet and the window itself.

Apply the plastic to the tape, trying to keep it relatively tight as you stick it down. Once you have all the edges taped down and trimmed, use the hairdryer on all of the film. I generally start at the top and work my way down, if you kept it fairly tight to begin with, it should be almost entirely wrinkle free when you get to the bottom. If you see wrinkles, keep the hairdryer around that area a little longer, they will tighten up.

Dangerosa
10-08-2014, 09:42 AM
I start in a corner and work out. For the 3M product, you end up doing pretty much the whole window, and I sometimes end up playing "chase the crease", as heat shrinking one area would cause a crease/wrinkle nearby.

And, some products will shrink out wrinkles better than others - the 3M you can - with a little work - generally get wrinkle free (depending on how nice you taped) - but I used ACE's much cheaper house brand last year and there was no way you were getting that stuff wrinkle free.

johnpost
10-08-2014, 11:01 AM
I think I will have to do this over some windows pretty soon. I've watched a video or two of someone working with Frost King plastic, cutting a big sheet and sticking it on to the double sided tape. But I do have a question: When sealing with the hair dryer, do I aim it all around the frame? Do I also move the hair dryer across the window itself? Do the whole window or just a big 'X'? It seems a little unclear.

it contracts where it has been heated.

if you saw wrinkles on a diagonal then heating to both sides at a right angle would tighten it.

when you put that on the window on the tape hand tight then it is still loose enough to make noise flapping back and forth from air currents in the room. it will show visible wrinkles especially in good light.

you should go over the whole thing in all directions. unless you do the whole thing you will cause tension ripples. when you do the whole thing it pulls uniformly tight and becomes invisible like window glass.

use 3M quality stuff.

salinqmind
10-08-2014, 11:53 AM
OK, I think I have it now.

- Put the tape all around the window frame.

- Attach a big square of film as best I can onto the tape so it sits there like another thin glass window (on top of the real glass).

- Use the hair dryer going across the entire square of film, back and forth, from top to bottom (or side to side) - it will then tighten up like another thin glass window (but not touching the real glass underneath)

Is that how it should go? I think so. Thanks for the answers.