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escaped
12-01-2015, 09:43 PM
Any one remember Gold key comics?/

stui magpie
12-01-2015, 09:45 PM
Yep,

Pretty sure they used to publish a lot of the Disney comics back in the 60's and 70's.

Trinopus
12-01-2015, 10:05 PM
Were they the ones who did a line of Star Trek comics? I know they did Time Tunnel and Land of the Giants.

I had a few of these when I was a lad, but they didn't survive. Alas, got thrown out lang and lang ago.

Scumpup
12-01-2015, 10:14 PM
Yeah, I remember them. They always seemed 3rd tier to me. DC and Marvel were first tier. Charlton Comics was a big drop down to 2nd tier. Gold Key, Classic Comics, and everything else aimed at kids was 3rd tier. Their stuff just didn't appeal to me. The only times I read them was while waiting at the barber shop. My barber had piles of them to keep his juvenile customers occupied.

Horatio Hellpop
12-01-2015, 10:16 PM
They kind of pioneered painted covers for comics. Russ Manning's Magnus Robot Hunter was a big highlight! I liked Dr. Spektor, mainly for the Jesse Santos artwork.

Miller
12-01-2015, 10:40 PM
Carl Barks (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carl_Barks), who invented Scrooge McDuck, is considered one of the titans of the comics medium. His entire run of Disney comics, including the Gold Key stuff, was reprinted between 1983 and 1990, in a ten volume hardcover set.

So, yeah, they're remembered. Some of them, pretty well.

cochrane
12-01-2015, 10:47 PM
The Star Trek comics were trash. They were written and drawn by people who had never seen one episode of the show.

I remember Walt Disney's Comics and Stories fondly. Although Gold Key is defunct, they're still in publication. I thought the Duck Tales animated series was well done and quite faithful to the comics it was adapted from.

hogarth
12-01-2015, 10:49 PM
When I was a kid, we had some Gold Key comics collected as Dynabrite Comics (http://goodcomics.comicbookresources.com/2010/09/28/scotts-classic-comics-corner-shedding-some-light-on-dynabrite/) collections, including classics like Mickey Mouse in "Island in the Sky", Donald Duck in "The Golden Helmet" and Scrooge McDuck in "The Golden Fleecing". I remember them very fondly; they were great stories!

CalMeacham
12-01-2015, 10:53 PM
They kind of pioneered painted covers for comics. Russ Manning's Magnus Robot Hunter was a big highlight! I liked Dr. Spektor, mainly for the Jesse Santos artwork.

No. Dell comics was doing it long before. Of course, both Dell and Gold Key were Western Publishing, just with different people running the presses. Most of Dell's titles went over to Gold Key after GK was founded, including the movie adaptations, the Walt Disney comics, Tarzan, and Turok Son of Stone.


I still have quite a stack of Gold Key comics. Their 1960s science fiction lines -- Magnus, Dr. Solar -- were pretty good, and their continuing Turok was great. After Tarzan moved to Gold Key they started doing adaptations of the Edgar Rice Burroughs books.

If you're interested, the Dell and Gold Key Tarzan comics are available free online, here:

http://www.erbzine.com/mag56/5660.html

Trinopus
12-01-2015, 11:07 PM
. . . I thought the Duck Tales animated series was well done and quite faithful to the comics it was adapted from.

The whole Disney Afternoon line-up was great! Chip and Dale Rescue Rangers was super, and Tailspin was great, and Duck Tales was the best of the bunch. Brilliant.

Later, Goof Troop was pretty good. Not super great, but very good.

Quack Pack was a horrid failure, just a ghastly monstrous flub of a blunder.

As Don Karnage might have said, "Zat is zee way the cookie, he crumbles."

Spoons
12-02-2015, 12:21 AM
I remember Gold Key comics. They were a staple of my childhood--all kinds of stories involving Hanna-Barbera cartoon characters, Warner Brothers cartoon characters, Walt Disney characters, and whatever live-action shows they could adapt (for example, "Captain Nice" and "My Favorite Martian"). I never really got into their more "older" material though, such as Turok, or Magnus.

I wasn't limited to Gold Key as a child, and also read Batman and Superman and so on. But what always struck me about Gold Key was that there was no advertising--not like in DC or Marvel comics, where we heard about Daisy BB guns and Raleigh bicycles, or we could win prizes for selling greeting cards or Grit. Rather, Gold Key filled in single pages with jokes, or brief articles on things kids might find interesting. I also noticed, that unlike DC, Marvel, and even Archie, Gold Key never carried the Comics Code Authority stamp.

Gold Key comics were good entertainment when I was a kid. I probably still have a few kicking around somewhere.

E-DUB
12-02-2015, 12:38 AM
I think they also did a "Twilight Zone" comic, as well. Anybody remember Carlton comics? Characters like the Fly, Blue Beetle, and a Captain America knockoff called The Shield.

Horatio Hellpop
12-02-2015, 04:04 AM
Anybody remember Carlton comics? Characters like the Fly, Blue Beetle, and a Captain America knockoff called The Shield.

No, those were MLJ/Archie/Red Circle. Charlton did the Action Heroes (Blue Beetle, The Question, Peacemaker), a bunch of crappy horror comics, E-Man and the Phantom.

Derleth
12-02-2015, 04:25 AM
Charlton did the Action Heroes (Blue Beetle, The Question, Peacemaker)AKA Nite Owl, Rorschach, and The Comedian.

Yes, Watchmen was originally going to be a resurrection of the Charlton Action Heroes. DC balked at a resurrection which would lead off with one of their recently-purchased characters being killed off and the situation deteriorating from there.

CalMeacham
12-02-2015, 07:18 AM
I think they also did a "Twilight Zone" comic, as well. Anybody remember Carlton comics? Characters like the Fly, Blue Beetle, and a Captain America knockoff called The Shield.

"Charlton Comics Give You More!"


Charlton gave us comics based on the movie Reptilicus (changed after the first couple of issues to Reptisaurus) and Gorgo. Some of these were actually drawn by the great comic boo=k artist Steve Ditko, who was better known for his work at Marvel (where he had been the original Spiderman artist)



For obscure comics, how about American Comics Group, which had a lot of supernatural titles (where ghosts were always depicted as having dashed outlines, and colored green) and the wonderfully offbeat Herbie:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Herbie_Popnecker

Kamino Neko
12-02-2015, 08:42 AM
Characters like the Fly, Blue Beetle, and a Captain America knockoff called The Shield.

As mentioned, only Blue Beetle was Charlton (actually, the original was Fox, but the more popular Ted Kord version was created for Charlton). And The Shield predated Captain America by about a year, which is why Cap has had a round shield for most of his existence (his original was too evocative of The Shield's look, so they changed it to avoid MLJ suing them).

Scumpup
12-02-2015, 09:01 AM
The Digital Comics Museum. (http://digitalcomicmuseum.com/index.php) Say goodbye to hours and hours of your life.

MrAtoz
12-02-2015, 09:55 AM
Here (http://www.newsfromme.com/iaq/iaq07/) is a thorough, and fairly easy to follow explanation of Gold Key, Dell, Western Printing, and how they all fit together.

Horatio Hellpop
12-02-2015, 01:40 PM
I've seen some fanzines from the 60s that actually referred to Gold Key as one of "The Big Three." Historically, there's always been a bit of a drop-off after the "big two."

RealityChuck
12-02-2015, 02:30 PM
When I was growing up in the 60s, Charlton was definitely third tier behind DC. (Marvel was unavailable in my area until I was well into my teens.)

Dell/Gold Key was second tier, though it didn't try to hard to compete with Superhero comics. They did do Little Lulu, one of the great comic books of all time.

Omar Little
12-02-2015, 02:58 PM
What about Harvey Comics?

Casper
Hot Stuff
Sad Sack
Richie Rich
Little Lotta
Little Dot
and many others

Bosda Di'Chi of Tricor
12-02-2015, 06:44 PM
Gold Key did space Family Robinson.
I had a crush on Tam Robinson.
http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_HBKWtrKbYAk/TNWodwn92pI/AAAAAAAAH5A/deFVUBXDEMY/s1600/SFR04601.jpg

drad dog
12-02-2015, 08:58 PM
Here (http://www.newsfromme.com/iaq/iaq07/) is a thorough, and fairly easy to follow explanation of Gold Key, Dell, Western Printing, and how they all fit together.

This is interesting. I have seen thousands of old Dells. I used to get Gold Keys as a small child.

My question: If Dell didn't fold into Gold Key, what were Dells titles after Gold Key was created?

MrAtoz
12-03-2015, 08:32 AM
This is interesting. I have seen thousands of old Dells. I used to get Gold Keys as a small child.

My question: If Dell didn't fold into Gold Key, what were Dells titles after Gold Key was created?

Probably very little that you'd remember. Quoting from wikipedia:

Dell Comics continued for another 11 years with licensed television and motion picture adaptations (including Mission: Impossible, Ben Casey, Burke's Law, Doctor Kildare, Beach Blanket Bingo) and a few generally poorly received original titles. Among the few long lasting series from this time include the teen-comic Thirteen Going on Eighteen (29 issues, written by John Stanley), Ghost Stories (37 issues, #1 only written by John Stanley), Combat (40 issues), Ponytail (20 issues), Kona Monarch of Monster Isle (20 issues), Toka the Jungle King (10 issues), and Naza Stone Age Warrior (9 issues). Dell additionally attempted to do superhero titles, including Nukla, Superheroes (starring the Fab 4, as the group's name was spelled on covers), Brain Boy, and a critically ridiculed trio of titles based on the Universal Pictures monsters Frankenstein, Dracula and Werewolf that recast the characters as superheroes.

furryman
12-03-2015, 02:24 PM
Star Trek and Dark Shadows were pretty bad but Carl Barks was great. Some of the Red Circle and Charlton super heroes were pretty good. I especially liked The Fly and Blue Beetle.