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View Full Version : Is one allowed to live in a Motel?


Chubbs
07-19-2001, 05:59 PM
I'm paying 1100 bones for rent (apartment). I could go to a Motel 6 for $29.99 a night (or less) Plus tax. Then I would be paying around $920 on a 30 day month. They would clean my room, I would have no lease agreement, No large deposit. I wouldn't need chairs, beds or a TV. There has to be a catch. Cause If there isn't, I'm out of my apartment when m lease is up.

KneadToKnow
07-19-2001, 06:05 PM
There are plenty of hotels with extended-stay rates. Some even specialize as "residential" hotels. I don't think you get the same level of service you do when you pay the nightly rate, though. Plus, you've got to remember that no lease doesn't just mean that you're free to go whenever you want. It also means that they're free to kick you out on the street whenever they want.

Gregor Samsa
07-19-2001, 06:06 PM
I work on the road quite a bit, and I routinely stay in motels or hotels for up to four months at a time.

It's not as much fun as you'd think, but it might well end up being cheaper than where you're currently living, by the sounds of it.

dolphinboy
07-19-2001, 06:11 PM
Sure.. but would you really want to? Motel rooms are cramped and the neighbors keep changing every day. Having a maid make your bed everyday may sound like a good idea, but having someone become familiar enough with your stuff to rob you blind wouldn't be so good. And the rooms are alot smaller than your apartment.

Sultan Kinkari
07-19-2001, 06:17 PM
Most hotel rooms aren't equipped with a kitchenette. While you might think you won't need one at first, I can assure you that you will be feinding for a microwave and a refrigerator after the first week you are there. I worked at a ski resort in Utah and lived in their employee housing, which was essentially an old hotel. I had a small room with two beds and a bathroom. Fortunately I had a good roommate. We both paid $350 a month, but housing in most resort towns is very expensive and it was probably my cheapest option.

I would worry about the maids stealing my stuff if I were you. You can imagine that the maids don't have much to begin with if they work as a maid at a motel. It happens all the time and it is hard to prove when it does happen. You will become slightly paranoid in that respect.

I suggest that you move into a house with roommates. I have does this before and in some instances the house was big enough that I was allowed privacy when I needed it. The rent was dispersed enough between all of us that it was more than affordable. I had a yard and could have had a pet if I wanted one.

If you don't need a bed chairs or a TV, I would suggest that you apply for a credit card and buy an older used motor home or trailer. Your monthly payments would be less than your current rent, and monthly fees at a trailer or RV park are usually reasonable.

Good Luck :)

minty green
07-19-2001, 07:37 PM
No inherent reason why you couldn't do it, but there may be local laws regulating length of stay in what are supposed to be temporary accomodations.

FarmerOak
07-19-2001, 11:37 PM
Wow, a subject I can sink my teeth into!

I've been in Hospitality Management for going on ten years now, including a stint as a General Manager with Motel 6, so I think I can address some of your questions.

I'm paying 1100 bones for rent (apartment). I could go to a Motel 6 for $29.99 a night (or less) Plus tax. Then I would be paying around $920 on a 30 day month.

First off, I dispute your premise. I cannot conceive of a city which has such high rents for a studio apartment, yet such low rents for motel rooms. For instance, I pay $605 dollars for a mini-one-bedroom apartment, in a city where the Motel 6 rents rooms for about $45. If I'm wrong about your fair city, then economically, it makes senses for you to move. However:

Sure.. but would you really want to? Motel rooms are cramped and the neighbors keep changing every day. Having a maid make your bed everyday may sound like a good idea, but having someone become familiar enough with your stuff to rob you blind wouldn't be so good. And the rooms are alot smaller than your apartment.

Amen, dolphinboy! Testify, my bruthah! Remember, if you live at Motel 6, you'll constantly be surrounded by people who STAY at Motel 6. During my tenure with Motel Hell, I would estimate that not less than 70% of my clientele was people with addresses within a five-mile radius. Local people rent rooms in cheap motels to do things that they would not DREAM of doing at home. The absolute worst part about working for Motel 6 was LIVING at Motel 6.

I will, however, take this opportunity to dispute that crack about the maid stealing from the room. Hotel and motel housekeepers work harder than any Doper, for miniscule wages, and are among the most reliable and dedicated persons it is my pleasure to know. I have never known one to steal from a guest.


Plus, you've got to remember that no lease doesn't just mean that you're free to go whenever you want. It also means that they're free to kick you out on the street whenever they want.


Not precisely true, Knead. Once you've been staying over 30 days continuously in a room, you are generally treated by the law as a Tenant, as opposed to a Guest. This is a whole different pot calling the kettle of fish in a barrel a bunch of monkeys, if you can follow my exquisite metaphor. Suffice to say, a landlord can spend MONTHS trying to evict a Tenant, whereas a quick call to the local constabulary is sufficient to evict a Guest. Therefore, the more astute hoteliers are pretty careful as to who they will and will not allow an extended stay. It's also interesting to note that, after 30 days, your landlord can no longer charge you tax on your room. Considering for a moment how much tax you pay on your apartment will clarify this concept for you.

Finally, I will address the title of your post: "Is one allowed to live in a Motel?" As with so many things it's pretty much up to the person (corporation) that owns the property and/or manages it.

Short answer: Yeah, you could do it. But no Doper would want to.


FarmerOak is currently employed as an Assistant General Manager at a hotel that does not suck. He has worked in Five Star Hotels and No Star Motels, and everywhere in-between. FarmerOak is Certified With Honors by the American Hotel and Motel Association in the fields of Hospitality Law, Hospitality Management and Hospitality Supervision. FarmerOak is not a licensed attorney, but is willing to answer your questions at the email link below.

BobT
07-20-2001, 12:43 AM
When Jerry Sloan first started coaching the Utah Jazz, he lived in a Motel 6 in Salt Lake City. I believe he thought he was out on the road too much to take care of his own place.

Presumably, the guy has made enough money coaching the Jazz that he can buy a condo or a home in Salt Lake City and hire someone to look after it.

FarmerOak
07-20-2001, 06:27 AM
Don't get me wrong... I LOVE my long-term guests and they love me. I have a gentleman in-house right now who has been with us for over a year. He is a professional gambler who can't be bothered with maintaining a household. I would venture to say that my hotel LOSES a couple grand a year by having that room set aside for him at a long-term (reduced) rate.

But he pays his bills, and when his friends come to town, there's only one place they'll stay: My House. And they don't get his rate.

There was a time, long since past, when many older and wealthier individuals, who did not care to maintain a household, did exactly what you propose, Chubbs. But that was a bygone era, and we're talking about a different milieu. I very seriously doubt that you are going to impress the next Mrs. Chubbs by inviting her back to room 137 for a nightcap and a tour of your complimentary ice bucket.

Markxxx
07-20-2001, 07:57 PM
I lived in a Motel 6 for a year and a half. It was fine. We had a resident for THREE years at the Sheraton I worked at.

BTW the law varies from state to state. For example after 30 days in IL they refund the tax to you. But in Maryland and Floriday it is 180 days. That is why in FL it is hard to get a lease for less than 6 months as they HAVE to charge you tax then refund it. If you have a 6 month lease it is tax free.

Also that only applies to STATE tax not county or other taxes unless stated as such.

Motel 6's vary from state to state. They are MUCH nicer down south than up north.

JonScribe
07-21-2001, 01:14 AM
You could always get a job as a night manager. You'll find that it's relaxing work. And I have plenty of time for my hobbies, such as taxidermy, and um, cross dressing.

Sincerely,

Norman Bates

FarmerOak
07-21-2001, 01:20 AM
Mea Culpa. Markxxx is absolutely right, the tax policy varies by locality, and YMMV. However, the tax to which I refer is NOT a state tax, but a Transient Occupancy Tax (TOT), which varies from city to city, not from state to state.

Regardless, the crux of the question was "can I?" and the rest of response addressed that.

And don't get me wrong... the motels I managed for Motel 6 were nice, well-kept properties. It was the GUESTS that ruined the experience.

Chubbs
07-25-2001, 04:03 PM
Tom Bodett leave the light on buddy. Here I come.

KneadToKnow
07-28-2001, 07:22 AM
Originally posted by FarmerOak
Not precisely true, Knead. Once you've been staying over 30 days continuously in a room, you are generally treated by the law as a Tenant, as opposed to a Guest.
I stand corrected.

D Marie
07-28-2001, 09:22 AM
This is probably overly academic, but if anyone's interested, I can recommend a book on this topic called Living Downtown: The History of Residential Hotels in the United States, by Paul Groth.

suziek
07-28-2001, 10:57 AM
The Motel 6 in Bangor, ME is only $29.95 a night, but believe me you wouldn't want to live there. I stayed there when I had to travel up to see the doc, but some of the guests were creepy and I was always looking out the window to check my car. When I travel, I usually stay in the Super 8, which I have found doesn't attract the weirdos and is really nice for the price. I wouldn't mind living in a Super 8 for a while, but the best would be a Residence Inn; they have kitchens and a living room, and they do have long-term rates because when I was staying in one in Albany, NY they had a guest who worked for the railroad who had been there for a year.