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View Full Version : "Tin Man" TV series shot in hydroelectric plant?


Napier
05-30-2016, 01:35 PM
Were the scenes showing the evil machine in the "Tin Man" TV movie series shown in a hydroelectric plant? The machine certainly looks to me like a row of real hydroelectric turbines and generators of maybe century old vintage.

engineer_comp_geek
05-30-2016, 01:45 PM
Moderator Action

Since this concerns the art of movie making, let's move it to Cafe Society.

Moving thread from General Questions to Cafe Society.

engineer_comp_geek
05-30-2016, 01:47 PM
One of the locations listed on IMDB for the movie series is Cleveland Dam in north Vancouver. So it's possible. Got a link to images or footage from the movie that shows what you think are generators?

Napier
05-30-2016, 02:01 PM
One of the locations listed on IMDB for the movie series is Cleveland Dam in north Vancouver. So it's possible. Got a link to images or footage from the movie that shows what you think are generators?

Very nice lead!

This is the closest thing I could find to similar looking machines (they are indeed hydroelectric generators, and they have horizontal shafts like the machines in the movie):
http://www.maineindustrial.com/DSCN1292.jpg

The few indoor images I find by searching Cleveland Dam in Vancouver show generators with vertical shafts, though the images I saw don't actually say they are of that dam's generators. If Cleveland Dam has generators with vertical shafts, then that's not it.

I didn't find any images about the movie that showed the machines.

donkeyoatey
05-30-2016, 03:12 PM
There are no generators at the Cleveland Dam. From here (http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/hydro-power-plans-considered-for-north-shore-dams-1.1150930)
The Cleveland Dam was completed in 1954 to store water for the Greater Vancouver Water District.
And from Wiki
The Cleveland Dam is a concrete dam at the head of the Capilano River in North Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada that holds back Capilano Lake, also known as Capilano reservoir. Part of the Capilano River Regional Park, it is not used for generating hydroelectricity, but rather for storing a portion of the Lower Mainland's drinking water.[1] It was started in 1951 and completed in 1954, and is named after Ernest Cleveland, first chief commissioner of the Greater Vancouver Water District.