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Jim B.
06-01-2016, 02:34 AM
It's been a little while since I attempted to fry an egg. But I still remember the terrible time I usually have.

The outside burns. The inside bubbles around the yolk, while I am waiting for what seems forever for the yolk to set. And the whole thing ultimately ends up in the trash, since it is essentially uneatable.

I've tried putting the heat up high. I've tried setting it low, with little difference. I've tried keeping the lid on, and keeping it off.

Interestingly, I've had my best luck just baking it in the oven. I put it on a greased cookie sheet. Then it come out picture-perfect--like the ones you get in the restaurants.

FYI, I am talking about sunny side up. But I wouldn't mind some advice on cooking then over-easy, should that come up too some day.

Thank you in advance, to all who reply:):):)

running coach
06-01-2016, 03:15 AM
This applies to a cast iron skillet(9 inch) and gas stove.
Keep the heat low. Even what seems like a short flame can get the pan over 500F.
Get an infrared thermometer. Keep heat below 400F, 350F is better.
Much butter. No, more than that. More.
After placing egg in pan(crack it first :D ), cover with small lid, small enough to reach the bottom of the pan.
if you have enough butter, you can spoon it over the top, the heat will be enough to help with the cooking.

Uniqueorn
06-01-2016, 03:15 AM
It's been a little while since I attempted to fry an egg. But I still remember the terrible time I usually have.

The outside burns. The inside bubbles around the yolk, while I am waiting for what seems forever for the yolk to set. And the whole thing ultimately ends up in the trash, since it is essentially uneatable.

I've tried putting the heat up high. I've tried setting it low, with little difference. I've tried keeping the lid on, and keeping it off.

Interestingly, I've had my best luck just baking it in the oven. I put it on a greased cookie sheet. Then it come out picture-perfect--like the ones you get in the restaurants.

FYI, I am talking about sunny side up. But I wouldn't mind some advice on cooking then over-easy, should that come up too some day.

Thank you in advance, to all who reply:):):)

Hi!

First of all, oven baked eggs are criminally underrated and I'm glad that you're getting good results with them.

When frying eggs, I put them on the lowest possible heat from the start. It takes about 10-12 minutes, but they tend to turn out really well.

Good luck!

kaylasdad99
06-01-2016, 03:58 AM
Oven baked eggs.

Back when I was a kid, we would sometimes have our dinner cooked in the following fashion:

Heat oven to 350F
Open a #10 can of corned beef hash; spread the contents over the bottom of a jelly roll sheet.
Crack one dozen eggs onto the top of the hash.
Bake until hash is hot and eggs are cooked (I'm guessing this took maybe 15-20 minutes).
Serve with buttered toast and canned peas.

aceplace57
06-01-2016, 04:59 AM
You need bacon fat to fry eggs. Heat pan on medium. The grease will pop when you add the egg. Use a spoon to baste the yolk and slightly cook it. the It will cook very quickly. Less than 2 mins.

Yolk should be runny. Serve over toast.

aceplace57
06-01-2016, 05:05 AM
https://d3cizcpymoenau.cloudfront.net/images/legacy/38725/SFS_perfect_fried_egg_color-73_article.jpg

Perfect fried egg. Crunchy edges. Yolk slightly cooked but still runny.

wolfman
06-01-2016, 06:19 AM
At least for me, perfect egg frying is a quickly lost skill. I have at several times had my technique down. But then, when I go without doing it for a while, I have to relearn it seems. Most cooking things once learned, stay learned, but not eggs :(

kayaker
06-01-2016, 07:06 AM
In addition to what others have said, basting with a tablespoon of very hot chicken broth is nice.

I occasionally cook a sunnyside up goose egg, with a hot but runny yolk. Basting is the only way to go with huge eggs.

NAF1138
06-01-2016, 08:09 AM
Basting is the method that most people will give you for sunny side up eggs, and it works. It's delicious and it saves you a ton of time. But, as I recently learned, if you have time you can cook them without basting, you just need lower heat, fresh eggs and more time. For eggs you almost always need less heat than you think. For me, for over eggs I set my range to 4 and a half (out of 10), for up eggs I set it to 3.5, for scrambled about 3.

Trick 1, use butter. Butter is important because of how it melts. It will tell you when your pan it hot enough but not too hot. You want it barely foamy and totally melted.

Trick 2, for up eggs only. Look at the egg cracked in the pan. See how the white has 2 levels? One bit of white is thin and runny right away and another is thicker and close to the yolk? That thicker bit is like a water balloon of runny white. Wait until the edges of the egg are totally set and then take a fork or very sharp knife and carefully puncture it. This is also the time to add salt. Swish the egg around gently in the pan to get the excess white out. Turn down the heat even more.

Wait. Wait longer. (this is the time when basting really speeds things up. Keep waiting until the white is set. It might take a few minutes. Go make toast.

The tough bit is, you have to know your range and your pan to really dial in this stuff. But less heat, more time more butter is usually the answer when it comes to eggs. Once you know your equipment you can move on to bacon grease or olive oil or other fun fats.

RealityChuck
06-01-2016, 08:16 AM
I've had success with this method from America's Test Kitchen (called Perfect Fried Eggs (https://www.kcet.org/food/weekend-recipe-perfect-fried-eggs)).

1. Put a tablespoon of oil in the pan. Heat it a low heat for 5 minutes.
2. Crack the eggs in a bowl. This is especially important if you have more than one egg, so they go in the pan at the same time.
3. Put up the heat to medium.
4. When the oil is shimmering, add a tablespoon of butter.
5. When the butter stops frothing, add the eggs.
6. Cover the pan and cook the eggs for one minute.
7. Remove the pan from the heat. Let sit 1-2 minutes covered (the longer, the less runny the yolk -- you can experiment to get the consistency you prefer).
8. Put the eggs on a plate.

running coach
06-01-2016, 09:48 AM
Once you know your equipment you can move on to bacon grease or olive oil or other fun fats.

There's a Rule 34 for this.

brainstall
06-01-2016, 09:48 AM
All that fat everyone is suggesting just seems like a lot to me. Take a cast iron pan and set the burner on low. I set mine to 2. Let the pan heat for a good long time - at least a few minutes, then add a small amount of butter. I use barely a half teaspoon, if that, just enough to add a thin film to the pan.

Crack the eggs into the pan. You can cover them with a lid if you want the white over the yolk to set, but I usually do mine over easy. Wait until the white is cooked and then gently flip. A metal spatula with a thin edge that slides under the eggs easily is my go to for fried eggs.

silenus
06-01-2016, 09:51 AM
Fat in pan. Add egg. Fry until yolk is half-solid. Flip and fry other side until every single bit of fluidity is gone from that yolk and the edges of the white are getting nicely crisp. Place properly-fried egg between two pieces of toast and munch.

NAF1138
06-01-2016, 09:54 AM
All that fat everyone is suggesting just seems like a lot to me. Take a cast iron pan and set the burner on low. I set mine to 2. Let the pan heat for a good long time - at least a few minutes, then add a small amount of butter. I use barely a half teaspoon, if that, just enough to add a thin film to the pan.

Crack the eggs into the pan. You can cover them with a lid if you want the white over the yolk to set, but I usually do mine over easy. Wait until the white is cooked and then gently flip. A metal spatula with a thin edge that slides under the eggs easily is my go to for fried eggs.

If you have a good nonstick pan (that would include well seasoned cast iron) you don't need that much fat. Again, I like butter when you are learning because watching how it reacts tells you when the pan is hot enough or too hot without needing anything else. That said, if you are making fried eggs and not using the fat to add some flavor/texture you are doing it wrong. Poach or soft boil your eggs instead. Fried eggs should taste fried. Don't eat them everyday, but when you do live a little.

I don't like covering my eggs personally, not just because it discolors the yolk (which will happen if you baste too soon too), but because it makes the whites all rubbery which I don't care for.

There's a Rule 34 for this.

No exceptions, right?

Gary T
06-01-2016, 09:54 AM
First of all, what is your perfect egg? And what exactly do you mean by waiting for the yolk to set? Do you want the yolk cooked firm rather than runny?

Personally, I am amazed that there are those like aceplace57, America's Test Kitchen, and silenus who praise having some crunchiness in an egg. To me that's an abomination, as I don't care to chew on cellophane. I also don't get sunny side up. Sure, it looks cool, but it's much more fuss to cook right than an over egg.

Anyway, the #1 sin in cooking eggs is having the pan (or grill ) TOO DAMN HOT! Turn it down, for Pete's sake. On an electric stove about 2 is right.

For a proper over easy egg, fold the outer super-runny part of the white onto the main body of the white as soon as it's firm enough to maneuver. When the white appears about half cooked, flip the egg. The goal: all the white firm (none of that runny snot) and the yolk nicely runny. And absolutely NO brown, cellophane, crunch, or anything like that.

If you like a firm yolk, break the yolk so it spreads out and cooks with the white.

Skammer
06-01-2016, 09:55 AM
Yeah, mine come out great without all that fat or basting. I use a bit of cooking spray on the pan, med-low heat, and cover with a lid. Takes maybe 5 minutes. Although most of the time, I'll flip the egg and add a slice of cheese and then put it between 2 slices of wheat toast for a sandwich with a slightly runny yolk. Yum.

TriPolar
06-01-2016, 09:56 AM
The basting methods work well. You can simply shake the pan to let the oil lap up over the egg also. If you want the yolk to firm up more you can lower the heat and let it go longer without burning, and also remove the egg to let it rest for a while.

I don't care though, I go to high heat, fry rapidly, and if the yolk isn't setting fast enough I'll go over easy. But I can understand the fried egg aficionado wanting to perfect the process.

salinqmind
06-01-2016, 10:13 AM
I've had success with a sunnyside up egg not too gooey on top by cooking in a small nonstick pan with a little butter, as best I can, puncturing the white around the yolk to spread it out in the pan to solidify. Or - I put the toaster oven on 'broil' when I start, and put the small pan on the rack under the broiler for a minute or two (with the handle sticking out of the oven). The egg comes out solidified on top, the whites firm, but the yolk still bright yellow and runny.

kayaker
06-01-2016, 10:21 AM
Pan Coverers: I use the serving plate to cover the pan, thus warming the plate.

Just Asking Questions
06-01-2016, 10:40 AM
For sunny-side:
I cook them on my breakfast griddle. As soon as they get on the griddle, splash a bit of water on the griddle and cover the egg with a pan lid. This steams the top of the white to doneness while the griddle takes care of the bottom. Advertisement-worthy eggs in only a few minutes.

Kyrie Eleison
06-01-2016, 10:57 AM
Former short-order breakfast cook here; I'll tell you the way I used to do it there, and still mostly do at home.

Take a 7 in. aluminum pan, like this (http://www.webstaurantstore.com/7-aluminum-fry-pan/407FRYPAN7.html) one. Add a tablespoon of vegetable oil. Heat for about 15-30 seconds over low heat -- on my gas stove at home, the right flame is just a little above the "low" setting on the dial. 30 seconds is for a cold pan, 15 is if the pan has been in use recently and is already warm. Swirl the oil in the pan, and then dump all of it out, leaving just what has coated the pan.

Place eggs in pan. You probably want to break them into a bowl first, but with practice, that's really not necessary. You can then just wait until the whites are fully set and serve, but to most people's taste, if you do so, either the yolks will be a little over, or the white will be undercooked, especially around and between the yolks.

Here's the trick to deal with that: Eggs are not just white and yolk. When you put the eggs in the pan, you'll notice that the whites are actually two distinct bits -- there's the white that spreads out evenly throughout the pan, but there's also a sac of white that forms up next to yolk. When you first put the eggs in the pan, take an iced tea spoon an gently break that sac. Give it a gentle scramble to spread it. Then, once the whites start to set -- around the time you could actually pour them onto a plate and have them still retain their shape, but while there is still uncooked white on top of a layer of cooked white -- take that same spoon and gently scrape the uncooked white from between the two yolks. Don't scrape all the way to the pan! Leave that cooked white there, and even a bit of the uncooked. The white between the yolks is always last to cook, and if you scrape some of it out of there, you'll get a more even cook without overcooking the remainder of the eggs.

That's the way we did it, but of course you can vary things. Oils other than vegetable are fine. Feel free to use Pam spray -- it's a pain in the ass to heat a tablespoon of oil just to dump it out as a home cook. In the restaurant, we just dumped it back in the oil container for use on the next order.

People who tell you to baste the eggs are just wrong. Doing so is fine, but then, obviously, you have basted eggs and not sunny side up eggs. Don't cover the eggs while they cook -- if you do, the small amount of white that invariably clings to the tops of the yolks will whiten, and you'll have a nice edible egg, but it won't have the pretty, entirely yellow yolk that is the hallmark of well cooked sunny side up eggs.

Finally, if you want the perfect sunny side up eggs that you see in menu pictures, cheat. Crack two eggs, separate the yolks and the whites. Cook the whites, plate, and then place the uncooked yolks on top.

PlumBob
06-01-2016, 10:57 AM
Crunchy fried eggs? You may as well leave bit of shell shrapnel in there.

Sunny side up, runny yolk, non crunchy white, set the top of white with a propane torch.

K364
06-01-2016, 10:57 AM
Are the eggs being stored in the refrigerator? That's a big issue: cold whites will be rubbery and cold yolks will produce inconsistent cooking. Place the eggs in a bowl of very hot water for at least 10 minutes before cooking.

Crack into medium-hot pan of butter. Edges should start to bubble immediately. Fold the edges into the main body so that they don't burn. Cover for 60 - 90 seconds then flip. If the pan temperature is correct, this will be easy and the yolks will not break. Cook for 30 - 60 more according to preference of runnyness.

Ukulele Ike
06-01-2016, 12:54 PM
I have a 7-inch nonstick skillet which is kept SOLELY for cooking eggs and omelettes. It makes a big difference.

Medium high heat, teaspoon of butter. Break eggs into pan, add salt and pepper. Dip your fingers into water and flick a few drops into the pan, then cover immediately. Count off one minute. Uncover -- the albumen over the yolks will have steamed and whitened -- and slips eggs onto plate. Perfectly cooked whites and nice loose yolks, and you haven't assumed the terrifying risk of flipping the egg and breaking the yolk and ruining breakfast AND EVERYTHING.

If you get good enough through practice, flipping the egg isn't all that difficult. Lift the pan and tip it; gravity will help you slide the egg onto the spatula. Turn the egg gently back into the pan and turn off the heat. That wasn't so hard!

leftfield6
06-01-2016, 01:27 PM
Eggs at room temp. When I made breakfast this morning, I placed two eggs in a bowl to sit on the counter until tomorrow AM I've done this for years.
Small non-stick good quality fry pan. I know people love their cast iron, but I have an anodized aluminum Calphalon pan that I have used for at least 10 years. I know exactly how it heats up.
Over medium/low heat for 10 minutes to get the pan to the right temp.
A teaspoon or maybe a tad more of butter, from the butter bell on the counter, so it too is at room temperature.
Butter melts, I swish it around in the pan so it's all covered.
Meanwhile, eggs have been cracked and are waiting in a small bowl
In they go!
Salt and fresh cracked pepper.
I like over medium, so they fry till I can tell the yolks are starting to firm up. just a little.
Lift the pan from the burner, tilt forward so the egg starts to slide, then a flick of the wrist and she is perfectly flipped. I break a yolk maybe once out of 30 flips.
Salt and fresh cracked pepper this side too.
Another minute or so, and slide out onto plate.


I am a creature of habit. I have these eggs, 4 strips of bacon, 2 pieces of toast with butter and a smear of preserves almost every day. Once a week or so, I'll do a "Full English" which replaces two strips of my bacon with sausage links, adds a condiment bowl sized serving of baked beans, and the same size of cooked mushrooms. During the summer this also means adding two halves of a roasted tomato.

silenus
06-01-2016, 01:45 PM
Proper English beans (http://www.britishcornershop.co.uk/heinz-baked-beans-in-tomato-sauce), or some American abomination?

That is a proper fry-up. Good job! Can you do mine about a minute longer on both sides? I'm a barbarian and want my eggs dead.

shunpiker
06-01-2016, 01:48 PM
You need bacon fat to fry eggs. Heat pan on medium. The grease will pop when you add the egg. Use a spoon to baste the yolk and slightly cook it. the It will cook very quickly. Less than 2 mins.

Yolk should be runny. Serve over toast.

Aceplace has it right here.
I just use the spatula to gently coax waves of bacon grease onto the surface of the huevo. I'm sure this is how they do it in Heaven. :)

Quimby
06-01-2016, 01:57 PM
I'm not a chef and I like my eggs in a way most people would say are over cooked but I do have some general suggestions:

1. Even if you want a soft yolk, covering for a minute or two helps set the white so you don't get that gooky stuff.

2. Eggs will cook a bit even after the heat is off so you should turn off the heat before you think the eggs are ready.

pulykamell
06-01-2016, 02:01 PM
For sunny-side:
I cook them on my breakfast griddle. As soon as they get on the griddle, splash a bit of water on the griddle and cover the egg with a pan lid. This steams the top of the white to doneness while the griddle takes care of the bottom. Advertisement-worthy eggs in only a few minutes.

I was gonna suggest this. Steam-basting (this method) is probably the easiest, most fool-proof method if you're having trouble. If I do them this way, I use medium to medium-high heat and about a good tablespoon or so of water. The difference between this method and the regular sunny-side-up-fry-without-a-cover method is that the yolks will develop a translucent white film over them, rather than being completely yellow. They end up looking like this (http://www.safeeggs.com/recipes/how-to-make-steam-basted-eggs). The yolk will still be runny (or not, if you prefer it that way and cook it longer.) I call them "fake over easy eggs."

As for tips about doing eggs over easy, I suggest a good, non-stick pan. I still use a bit of cooking spray and/or butter. Crack the eggs into the pan over medium to medium-high heat. When the bottom is done, I take a spatula and lift the edges while shaking the pan laterally to make sure the egg is completely released from the pan and able to slide well. Then the tricky part comes (and you need practice for this). You have to flip the eggs with the pan. You kind of point the pan down and out, let the eggs slide down it, and when it reaches the lip, you flick your wrist to get it to flip up and over (I think I jerk my hand back as well when I do the flip. It's a bit hard to describe the motion--I'm sure there's Youtube videos that show it.) I only do two eggs at a time this way. I'm not good enough to get three eggs flipped consistently without screwing it up. You can also try flipping with a spatula in the pan.

NAF1138
06-12-2016, 08:37 AM
Bumping this to link to a new article by J. Kenji Lopez-Alt on the subject of frying eggs over super high heat so that they taste really fried. It's a good read. http://www.seriouseats.com/2016/06/how-to-make-crispy-browned-fried-eggs.html

DonLogan
06-12-2016, 09:27 AM
You need a non-stick pan of sufficient quality that the inside bottom is really flat, and small enough so the whites are equally distributed across the surface, but not too thinly.

I bought a set of T-Fal Professional fry pans about a year ago and the 8 inch is perfect for 2 eggs.

I see they make a 4.75 inch called the "One Egg Wonder."

Tibby or Not Tibby
06-12-2016, 09:53 AM
Try froaching (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TXoSlD4WaKY) your eggs.

This morning I fried a strip of bacon, removed the bacon, froached an egg in the bacon grease, crumbled the bacon into a bowl of grits, put the egg on top and mixed the yoke into the grits. Good stuff.

Johnny L.A.
06-12-2016, 10:10 AM
We eat over easy eggs here. (I never cared for the 'over' in egg descriptions. 'Over easy' sounds like 'too easy' instead of 'easy and flipped over'.) First I melt a goodly amount of butter in a heavy, 10" non-stick frying pan. This is for four eggs, and I like them to swim. I melt the butter with the element set to 'low' while the bacon is cooking. When I'm ready to cook the eggs, I put the pan on the (large) element the bacon was on and set the heat to six. When the bottoms of the whites start to set, I separate the eggs with a spatula. This allows more white to get to the pan. When the whites are just about half-done, I flip the eggs over, being careful not to break the yolks. (Hey, if we wanted hard yolks we'd go to McDonald's or use the breakfast sandwich maker or something.) At this point it takes about the same time for the eggs to finish cooking as it does to serve up the hashbrowns on the warmed plates. We put the eggs on top of the hashbrowns so that the yolk can run over them.

For those wondering why I don't cook my eggs in bacon grease, we like a lighter flavour for hashbrowns and eggs, which is a heavy breakfast already. When I make 'home fries' the potatoes and onions are fried in the bacon grease and the eggs are steamed on top when the potatoes are done.

John Mace
06-12-2016, 11:54 AM
Basting is a great method to use (add a bit of water, let it boil, and then cover), but... it's very easy to overcook. Even 15 extra seconds can ruin the egg and turn the yolk solid. I used to baste all the time, but too many overcooked eggs. Now, I use the "very low heat" method. Works great. Once the white is fully set, the yolk is still nice and fluid.

I do agree that butter or bacon grease adds a nice taste, but olive oil works reasonably well, too.