PDA

View Full Version : Movies that tell you what's going to happen


iamthewalrus(:3=
06-01-2016, 07:35 PM
I don't mean movies where the plot is foreshadowed or predictable or by the numbers. I mean one where the characters literally tell you, in dialog, what's going to happen in the rest of the movie.

I was watching Moulin Rouge the other evening, and I was delighted at The Pitch song, where they sing a song explaining exactly what's going to happen in the movie. Another movie that did this recently (not in musical form) was The Interview.

What are others? Please, no plot spoilers (presumably, by the time you get to the appropriate scene in the movie, it's going to spoil itself for you).

Richard John Marcej
06-01-2016, 07:44 PM
I suppose you could say that the original The Producers lays out the entire film within the first few minutes when Wilder's Leo Blum tells Mostel's Max Bialystock the whole premise. Not sure if they did this in the stage play or the film version of the play, I haven't seen either.

Loach
06-01-2016, 07:49 PM
Shoot 'Em Up. There's almost no plot. All you need to know is right there in the title.

Ethilrist
06-01-2016, 08:07 PM
The Princess Bride.

The Grandson: Has it got any sports in it?
Grandpa: Are you kidding? Fencing, fighting, torture, revenge, giants, monsters, chases, escapes, true love, miracles...

Sampiro
06-01-2016, 08:18 PM
Sunset Blvd. begins with the narrator face down and fully dressed and dead in a swimming pool. (Not a spoiler because it is literally the first scene in the movie.)

American Beauty begins with a main character telling you he is going to be dead soon.

A novel but I'll mention it anyway: in Breakfast of Champions, Vonnegut told you but he explicitly what's going to happen several times. (There is a movie version as well, but it is unwatchable. )

buddha_david
06-01-2016, 08:21 PM
Memento begins with the final scene of the movie, and then works backwards.

epbrown01
06-01-2016, 08:50 PM
I haven't seen it, but a complaint I've read about A Few Good Men is that Cruise's character lays out a strategy for the final scene, which then plays out exactly as he describes.

Miller
06-01-2016, 08:50 PM
"Two households, both alike in dignity,
In fair Verona, where we lay our scene,
From ancient grudge break to new mutiny,
Where civil blood makes civil hands unclean.
From forth the fatal loins of these two foes
A pair of star-cross'd lovers take their life;
Whose misadventured piteous overthrows
Do with their death bury their parents' strife.
The fearful passage of their death-mark'd love,
And the continuance of their parents' rage,
Which, but their children's end, nought could remove,
Is now the two hours' traffic of our stage;
The which if you with patient ears attend,
What here shall miss, our toil shall strive to mend."

Pretty sure that was in a movie at some point.

kunilou
06-01-2016, 08:56 PM
Love Story begins with Oliver talking about Jenny completely in the past tense.

Thudlow Boink
06-01-2016, 09:20 PM
A novel but I'll mention it anyway: in Breakfast of Champions, Vonnegut told you but he explicitly what's going to happen several times. IIRC, in Galapagos he puts asterisks by the names of the characters who are going to die in the novel.

Biggirl
06-01-2016, 09:33 PM
The book John Dies In The End tells you. When I read the thread title, I thought of True Lies when Arnold's character is given truth serum and tells them exactly what he's going to do. But that was just one scene, not the whole movie.

porcupine
06-01-2016, 09:45 PM
Obliquely, The Prestige.

Cutter: Every great magic trick consists of three parts or acts. The first part is called "The Pledge". The magician shows you something ordinary: a deck of cards, a bird or a man. He shows you this object. Perhaps he asks you to inspect it to see if it is indeed real, unaltered, normal. But of course... it probably isn't. The second act is called "The Turn". The magician takes the ordinary something and makes it do something extraordinary. Now you're looking for the secret... but you won't find it, because of course you're not really looking. You don't really want to know. You want to be fooled. But you wouldn't clap yet. Because making something disappear isn't enough; you have to bring it back. That's why every magic trick has a third act, the hardest part, the part we call "The Prestige"."


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Morbo
06-01-2016, 09:48 PM
At the beginning of Shaun of the Dead, Ed says this while suggesting they get drunk to help Shaun get over Liz:

"Bloody Mary first thing, bite at The Kings Head, couple at The Little Princess, stagger back here, back at the bar for shots."

That's exactly what happens. Screenshot, also a spoiler (https://www.wired.com/images_blogs/underwire/2013/08/Shaun-Foreshadowing.jpg)

Dewey Finn
06-01-2016, 10:17 PM
Sunset Blvd. begins with the narrator face down and fully dressed and dead in a swimming pool. (Not a spoiler because it is literally the first scene in the movie.)
That's a movie told in flashback, as was Citizen Kane. I don't think they're telling you what's going to happen, just where the story ends up. You watch the movie to see how you get there.

SenorBeef
06-01-2016, 10:39 PM
Obliquely, The Prestige.


It's a really clever meta-narrative. The narrative is set up to mimic the structure of the illusions they're performing, after a fashion. It's pretty clever. I strongly recommend it to anyone who hasn't seen it.

journeyman_southpaw
06-01-2016, 10:49 PM
The prophecy in the first Tim Burton Alice in Wonderland movie. It wasn't even a cryptic prophecy, it pretty much told the audience how the movie would end.

Sage Rat
06-02-2016, 12:10 AM
At the beginning of Machete Kills, there's a trailer for the movie Machete Kills, that's just so over the top and silly that you're like, "Yeah right."

And then that's the movie. :D

msmith537
06-02-2016, 12:15 AM
At the beginning of Shaun of the Dead, Ed says this while suggesting they get drunk to help Shaun get over Liz:

"Bloody Mary first thing, bite at The Kings Head, couple at The Little Princess, stagger back here, back at the bar for shots."

That's exactly what happens. Screenshot, also a spoiler (https://www.wired.com/images_blogs/underwire/2013/08/Shaun-Foreshadowing.jpg)


Also the names of the 12 bars of the "Golden Mile" in The World's End basically outline the entire plot.

msmith537
06-02-2016, 12:19 AM
Not a film, but in Game of Thrones, Bronn basically lays out how the battle between The Mountain and Prince Obberon is going to play out:


"I'd be a bloody fool if he didn't frighten me. He's freakish big and freakish strong. And quicker than you'd expect for a man of that size. Maybe I could take him, dance around until he's so tired of hacking at me, he dropped his sword, get him off his feet somehow. But one misstep...[snaps fingers] and I'm dead."

Bryan Ekers
06-02-2016, 12:22 AM
Well, near the end of Lord of War, Nicholas Cage tells a character "now let me tell you what is going to happen", and it does.

ekedolphin
06-02-2016, 01:50 AM
Tangled. Flynn Rider starts out by narrating, "This is the story of how I died."

Garula
06-02-2016, 01:51 AM
Liam Neeson's oft quoted/parodied "I have a particular set of skills" monologue in Taken pretty much lays out what he's going to do for the rest of the film.

RealityChuck
06-02-2016, 08:49 AM
Also the names of the 12 bars of the "Golden Mile" in The World's End basically outline the entire plot.Simon Pegg loves to do this. In Hot Fuzz, he has them discuss the first four victims and during the discussion, the motives for their murders are all mentioned.

In The Usual Suspects, Mr. Kobayashi hands out packages to the group. The order in which they get the packages is the order in which they die.

Prof. Pepperwinkle
06-02-2016, 09:30 AM
Cabaret. Each of the musical numbers reveals the intent of the scene that follows.

terentii
06-02-2016, 09:45 AM
At the beginning of Shaun of the Dead, Ed says this while suggesting they get drunk to help Shaun get over Liz:

"Bloody Mary first thing, bite at The Kings Head, couple at The Little Princess, stagger back here, back at the bar for shots."

In The Sixth Sense, the kid kind of gives everything away when he says

"I see dead people."

During the filming of Goldfinger, Sean Connery objected to having Q point out all the features of the Aston-Martin in the workshop; he felt they should come as a surprise to the audience. One of the producers (probably Cubby Broccoli) overruled him, saying "First tell them what you're going to do, and then do it!" After seeing the finished film, Connery had to admit he was wrong and Broccoli was right.

Annie-Xmas
06-02-2016, 09:48 AM
Heaven on Their Minds , the first song in Jesus Christ Superstar, kind of gives away the plot for those who didn't know it.

terentii
06-02-2016, 09:50 AM
Sunset Blvd. begins with the narrator face down and fully dressed and dead in a swimming pool. (Not a spoiler because it is literally the first scene in the movie.)

Reminds me too of Double Indemnity, which was on TCM a couple of weeks ago. You know almost from the start that Fred MacMurray is going to end up dead, either in the hospital or in the gas chamber.

Both films were directed by the great Billy Wilder!

terentii
06-02-2016, 09:58 AM
I suppose you could say that the original The Producers lays out the entire film within the first few minutes when Wilder's Leo Blum tells Mostel's Max Bialystock the whole premise. Not sure if they did this in the stage play or the film version of the play, I haven't seen either.

I have to ask....

How do you know this if you haven't seen either? :dubious: :confused:

Max does indeed tell Leo how he expects things to go (one of the funniest scenes in the movie); of course, they don't exactly turn out that way! :(

Biggirl
06-02-2016, 10:01 AM
What about D.O.A.? Film noir classic where the first scene is Frank Bigelow at the police station reporting his own murder? From the beginning you know he's been poisoned and he'll find out who did it. Again, that's not a spoiler. It's the first scene.

terentii
06-02-2016, 10:04 AM
Yes, Leo was the first to mention the possibilities of "creative accounting," but it was Max who really jumped on the idea (and on Leo as well). :D

Marvin the Martian
06-02-2016, 10:22 AM
How do you know this if you haven't seen either? :dubious: :confused:I believe he is talking about not having seen the Broadway musical (2001) and subsequent movie (2005), both of which were based on the original (non-musical, and IMHO far superior) movie (1968).

terentii
06-02-2016, 10:26 AM
I believe he is talking about not having seen the Broadway musical (2001) and subsequent movie (2005), both of which were based on the original (non-musical, and IMHO far superior) movie (1968).

There's a second movie?!? Good Lord, why even bother?!? :mad: :smack: :(

Don Draper
06-02-2016, 10:31 AM
Not a movie, but in an early chapter of the final book in Doug Adams' "Hitchhiker" series, Mostly Harmless, Arthur Dent idly reads a novel which has the whole plot-line hashed out in a paragraph. Arthur throws it away in disgust. The vague description of the plot of that book however is also the plot of Mostly Harmless (which many Doug Adams fans threw aside in disgust after reading.)

Biggirl
06-02-2016, 10:37 AM
Do backward narrative movies count? Like Pulp Fiction and Go? These movies tell you where they end up and the movie is about how they get there.

Biggirl
06-02-2016, 10:42 AM
Ooh, ooh! Just thought of another. In Run, Lola, Run we know how the movie will end and spend the whole time trying to get to an alternate ending, which we also know.

RealityChuck
06-02-2016, 10:59 AM
IIRC, in Topkapi they go over the entire plan for stealing a jeweled knife. It goes off as discussed (with one small problem :)). Rififi (which I haven't seen) also should have a similar scene. Both were directed by Jules Dassin.

As a matter of fact, an explanation of what is going to happen would be required in any caper flick.

In The Stunt Man, Chuck Barton goes over every aspect of the final stunt with Cameron beforehand. It happens exactly as Barton tells him; the suspense is that Cameron isn't sure that it won't be deliberately sabotaged.

Peter Morris
06-02-2016, 11:15 AM
One minute into Annie Hall is the line "Annie and I broke up."

Smitty
06-02-2016, 11:24 AM
In Iron Man the terrorists give away the entire plot after kidnapping Tony, but only if you speak Urdu.

In the original Total Recall Arnold is half sedated when the dream techs ask him what kind of fantasy he wants. He tells them, and that is the exact plot of the movie.

iamthewalrus(:3=
06-02-2016, 01:50 PM
Of the ones I've seen, I'd say the scene in True Lies and the description in Shaun of the Dead and are the closest to what I'm thinking of. True Lies is just one scene, but it's literally spelled out. Shaun of the Dead is some clever word play, but does basically tell you the whole structure of the movie.

I don't think movies told in flashback, or movies where the ending is revealed early on qualify, since usually there's plenty of mystery in how you get there.

And, of course, the chorus at the beginning of Romeo and Juliet. Did that sort of thing used to be more common in theater?

Richard John Marcej
06-02-2016, 02:30 PM
I have to ask....

How do you know this if you haven't seen either? :dubious: :confused:

Max does indeed tell Leo how he expects things to go (one of the funniest scenes in the movie); of course, they don't exactly turn out that way! :(

I've seen the original 1967 The Producers several times.
I've never seen the stage play version of The Producers that came out last decade or the movie version based on that stage play that came out in 2005, so I don't know if these latest versions differed from the original version.

terentii
06-02-2016, 02:50 PM
I've seen the original 1967 The Producers several times.
I've never seen the stage play version of The Producers that came out last decade or the movie version based on that stage play that came out in 2005, so I don't know if these latest versions differed from the original version.

Aha! :)

I love that movie. I've seen it at least ten times! No interest in the reboot whatsoever.

Telemark
06-02-2016, 02:50 PM
There's a second movie?!? Good Lord, why even bother?!? :mad: :smack: :(
The second movie is a fairly faithful version of the Broadway play, which is significantly different than the original (1967) movie. The play was a musical; the only song in the original movie was "Springtime for Hitler".

terentii
06-02-2016, 03:05 PM
The second movie is a fairly faithful version of the Broadway play, which is significantly different than the original (1967) movie. The play was a musical; the only song in the original movie was "Springtime for Hitler".

[Voice of Derek Jacoby]: Yes ... I know. ;)

Quimby
06-02-2016, 03:10 PM
In the original Total Recall Arnold is half sedated when the dream techs ask him what kind of fantasy he wants. He tells them, and that is the exact plot of the movie.

There is a second moment like this in Total Recall when the bald executive tries to talk Arnold down and he shoots him because he was sweating. What he describes is exactly how the remainder of the movie plays out.

Related: When I rented The Game. I took the disk out and put it in my player as it was loading I said to my friend, "I bet a whole lot of weird shit happens that the guy thinks is real but in the end he finds out it's just a game." I should have ejected the disk right then.

Nightfall1
06-02-2016, 03:39 PM
Gandhi
He gets shot at the beginning, all the rest of the movie is a flashback of his life.

The Other Waldo Pepper
06-02-2016, 04:38 PM
Of the ones I've seen, I'd say the scene in True Lies and the description in Shaun of the Dead and are the closest to what I'm thinking of. True Lies is just one scene, but it's literally spelled out. Shaun of the Dead is some clever word play, but does basically tell you the whole structure of the movie.

There's a classic movie that fits with those -- but as the twist ending, so I'm spoilering even the title. And so HERE BE SPOILERS!

Witness For The Prosecution: the defense attorney tells the defendant's wife that "your husband's entire defense depends on his word and yours" but adds that "the jury will be quite skeptical of the word of a man accused of murder, when supported only by that of his wife."

After all, what would you expect a wife to say? Don't you know that, "under British law, you cannot be called to give testimony damaging to your husband?"

She harshly replies that, in point of fact, their marriage is null and void. "He is not my husband," she explains with absolutely no warmth. She then adds, while sounding (a) sarcastic and (b) not at all like she means it, that "I will give him an alibi and I shall be very convincing; there will be tears in my eyes".

As per the title, she's called to the stand not as a bland defense witness to rubber-stamp his alibi -- but as a witness for the prosecution, who destroys his alibi. And then, on cross-examination, she gets shown evidence of her guilt and breaks down and confesses that she was framing him for murder -- and, with tears in her eyes, gives him a very convincing alibi.

And it gets him acquitted! So his defense did depend on it, and it was way more convincing than the approach that would've induced skepticism!

Elendil's Heir
06-02-2016, 04:48 PM
...In The Usual Suspects, Mr. Kobayashi hands out packages to the group. The order in which they get the packages is the order in which they die.
Ooo, I never realized that before. Nice one!

Peter Morris
06-02-2016, 06:33 PM
The second movie is a fairly faithful version of the Broadway play, which is significantly different than the original (1967) movie. The play was a musical; the only song in the original movie was "Springtime for Hitler".

nitpick - there was also the hippie flower song Love Power and a few fragments of other songs during the Hitler auditions ("with a bing-bang-bing-bang-boom") and it finished with Prisoners of Love.

TroutMan
06-02-2016, 07:50 PM
Of the ones I've seen, I'd say the scene in True Lies and the description in Shaun of the Dead and are the closest to what I'm thinking of. True Lies is just one scene, but it's literally spelled out.
If scenes count, then Drew Barrymore in Charlie's Angels (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZcviqZhXnNo) describes exactly how she's going to defeat all the guys while tied to a chair.

Morbo
06-02-2016, 08:00 PM
And as far as single scenes go, probably my favorite from The Rocketeer:

Timothy Dalton has just gotten the upper hand and strapped on the rocket pack, and as he prepares to escape the burning zeppelin, he smiles and says "I'm going to miss Hollywood." Then he flies off, but he didn't realize the rocket pack had a leak, and he careens out-of-control towards the HOLLYWOODLAND sign...crashing into and taking out just the letters LAND.

JohnT
06-02-2016, 10:59 PM
Titanic

Yes you knew what was going to happen at the end, but there was the scene where they had the video animation showing the ship sinking.

Mr. Greenjeans
06-03-2016, 07:39 AM
Sunset Blvd. begins with the narrator face down and fully dressed and dead in a swimming pool. (Not a spoiler because it is literally the first scene in the movie.)

Well, kind of a spoiler, I think. Do we know the guy in the pool is the narrator at the beginning of the movie? (Sorry, it's been many years since I've seen it.)

iamthewalrus(:3=
06-03-2016, 02:07 PM
Titanic

Yes you knew what was going to happen at the end, but there was the scene where they had the video animation showing the ship sinking.Yeah, but the plot of Titanic is not "the ship sinks". It's about what happens to the main characters before and as the ship is sinking.