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View Full Version : I ate a hot dog with ketchup yesterday


Mean Mr. Mustard
06-05-2016, 08:04 AM
It was brought to me already prepared. I was hungry. I had few options.

Here's the thing: it was a damn tasty dog. Who knew?

I will no longer arch my eyebrows at anyone who professes enjoyment from such a sandwich.

It's not going to be my default, but I acknowledge that I learned something from the experience.


mmm

running coach
06-05-2016, 08:09 AM
A real man would have gone hungry.
:D

panache45
06-05-2016, 08:56 AM
I usually prepare two dogs, one with mustard and one with ketchup, both with grilled onions or additional toppings. I then alternate between the two.

If I had to choose, it'd be ketchup.

I trust, Mean Mr. Mustard, this doesn't signify a new screen name for you.

FairyChatMom
06-05-2016, 09:44 AM
I've always eaten my dogs with ketchup. Not that I care what condiment snobs think anyway - it's a HOT DOG. We're not talking prime rib, fercryinoutloud!!!

Digital is the new Analog
06-05-2016, 11:11 AM
I trust, Mean Mr. Mustard, this doesn't signify a new screen name for you.

I suggest Ketchup is the new Mustard.

ThelmaLou
06-05-2016, 11:17 AM
I like them with mustard and ketchup, onions and relish. I don't want to miss out on anything.

Or with mustard and sauerkraut.

My late husband (God bless him) ate hot dogs with mayonnaise. Other than that, he was a great guy.

ETA. Hmmm...shouldn't this be in Cafe Society, as it concerns Fine Dining?

pulykamell
06-05-2016, 11:21 AM
I don't like it on regular dogs, but, for some reason, it works on a cheese dog for me. Actually, I've been on a Heinz 57 kick lately, so that's what I've most recently been putting on cheese dogs, but similar kind of idea, except tangier. Mustard works, too, on a cheese dog, but maybe the ketchup + cheese thing is just taking me back to my childhood, where my cousin and I would go to the local hot dog stand and order dogs with a slice of American cheese and ketchup on it.

I'll do mayo on a dog sometimes, too, but that's if I'm doing a Sonoran dog or Tijuana/"danger dog" kind of thing. See here for those unfamiliar (http://www.seriouseats.com/2009/07/hot-dog-of-the-week-tijuana-dog.html). I do mine in a flour tortilla, though.

Sunspace
06-05-2016, 11:23 AM
Peanut butter on hot dogs is the way to go. :-)

Doug K.
06-05-2016, 11:37 AM
I've always maintained that hot dogs and catsup are mutually inclusive. That is, hot dogs are.only edible with catsup and catsup is only edible on a hot dog.

pidgeon92
06-05-2016, 11:39 AM
I prefer ketchup. Though I really prefer cheese. :o

Tim R. Mortiss
06-05-2016, 11:48 AM
Burger King (which now sells hot dogs) puts both ketchup and mustard on their dogs, along with chopped onions and relish. It's not bad.

ThelmaLou
06-05-2016, 12:22 PM
Burger King (which now sells hot dogs) puts both ketchup and mustard on their dogs, along with chopped onions and relish. It's not bad.

Ahem. I like them with mustard and ketchup, onions and relish. I don't want to miss out on anything.
...

RobDog
06-05-2016, 12:34 PM
Ketchup + mustard + cooked onion + finely chopped raw onion + slice of very crisp bacon = RobDog.

AngelSoft
06-05-2016, 12:55 PM
Peanut butter on hot dogs is the way to go. :-)

While not quite the same, I LOVE peanut butter on my breakfast link sausages. I'd never thought of putting it on hot dogs. HMM.

cochrane
06-05-2016, 01:05 PM
One of us! One of us! Gooble gobble, one of us!

Smapti
06-05-2016, 01:07 PM
Well, did you at least partake joyously of No Hot Dog Buns?

robby
06-05-2016, 01:08 PM
I refer you to the classic column by the Perfect Master, in which he explains why ketchup should not be put on a properly assembled hot dog:

Why is there no ketchup on a properly made hot dog? (http://www.straightdope.com/columns/read/679/why-is-there-no-ketchup-on-a-properly-made-hot-dog)

...If you go into an authentic hot dog joint and ask for ketchup on your hot dog, the counterman will pause and look you in the eye. He may or may not say, "Ketchup?" with a tone of disbelief. But you may be certain what he's thinking: "Behold this creature that walks like a man. It wants ketchup on its hot dog."

But hey, if you want ketchup, by all means get it.

:D

IvoryTowerDenizen
06-05-2016, 01:12 PM
Let's pop this over to Café Society

Johnny Ace
06-05-2016, 01:31 PM
Ketchup is for French fries. Keep your tomatoey mitts away from my hot dog! :D

beowulff
06-05-2016, 01:32 PM
Ketchup is the ultimate condiment, and goes on everything.

I’m a bit of a hotdog snob*, and I always eat my dogs with everything - ketchup, mustard, relish, sauerkraut, and anything else they have.



*For credentials, I offer: This (https://rutheh.files.wordpress.com/2010/05/img_0066.jpg), where I spent many an hour playing pinball and eating hotdogs when I was in college.

Gatopescado
06-05-2016, 01:38 PM
Ketchup on a Hot Dog is an Abomination. Period.

Ask Clint Eastwood.

Asimovian
06-05-2016, 01:41 PM
My late husband (God bless him) ate hot dogs with mayonnaise. Other than that, he was a great guy.This is an oft overlooked and underrated condiment choice for hot dogs. One of the things I like about getting a hot dog at Five Guys is that I can get mayo on it without anyone treating me like a freak. To my face.

Chronos
06-05-2016, 01:56 PM
The bit I can't understand: The region of the world where ketchup is considered such an abomination is also the same region where they habitually bury their dogs under so much salad that you can't even find the meat. I mean, I could understand a hot dog purist, who liked them plain, or with only one or two specific condiments. But if you're dumping the entire garden on it, what difference does one more topping make?

Two Many Cats
06-05-2016, 01:59 PM
Chicagoan reporting in, and I am here to state that the entire "no ketchup on hot dogs" taboo is a running joke that got out of hand.

Growing up, I ate at dozens of Chicago hot dog stands, and had ordered hot dogs with just ketchup and mustard, and nobody batted an eye. It wasn't until years later, sometime in the late eighties I think, that this culinary quirk sprang into being.

The now defunct Harry's Hot Dogs on Franklin and Randolph was a Chicago institution for over fifty years, and a hot dog there with everything automatically included ketchup. If you didn't want ketchup, you had to tell them to leave it off. They weren't the only place in town doing that.

If you want ketchup, ask for it.

Peremensoe
06-05-2016, 02:04 PM
The bit I can't understand: The region of the world where ketchup is considered such an abomination is also the same region where they habitually bury their dogs under so much salad that you can't even find the meat. I mean, I could understand a hot dog purist, who liked them plain, or with only one or two specific condiments. But if you're dumping the entire garden on it, what difference does one more topping make?

They don't dump sugar on it.

Also, purist is not minimalist.

terentii
06-05-2016, 02:11 PM
When I was little, I used to love hot dogs slathered with Cheez-Whiz and Kraft Sandwich spread. Then when I was eight or so, I had two for lunch with a bowl of cream of mushroom soup, and everything came back up in about ten minutes. I remember running out of the diner and puking my guts out in the parking lot. Don't think I've had hot dogs like that since.

For plain (i.e., jumbo all-beef ball park) hot dogs, I like ketchup and green relish, though I can be persuaded to add a dash of mustard or two.

For chili cheese dogs, French's mustard and chopped raw onion.

For pronto pups, just French's mustard, please.

The best hot dogs in the world, IMHO, are Chicago-style, made with Vienna franks. Kosher dogs that snap when you bite them waaaay outclass your average supermarket variety. :o

panache45
06-05-2016, 02:14 PM
The now defunct Harry's Hot Dogs on Franklin and Randolph was a Chicago institution for over fifty years, and a hot dog there with everything automatically included ketchup. If you didn't want ketchup, you had to tell them to leave it off. They weren't the only place in town doing that.
I've had many a hot dog at the original Coney Island Nathan's, where dogs are prepared with "da woiks." This includes ketchup.

cochrane
06-05-2016, 02:47 PM
Burger King (which now sells hot dogs) puts both ketchup and mustard on their dogs, along with chopped onions and relish. It's not bad.

The dog itself is good, too. All beef, nice smoky flavor, has that snap when you bite into it. Much better than the Wienerschnitzel variety.

robby
06-05-2016, 03:00 PM
Chicagoan reporting in, and I am here to state that the entire "no ketchup on hot dogs" taboo is a running joke that got out of hand.

Growing up, I ate at dozens of Chicago hot dog stands, and had ordered hot dogs with just ketchup and mustard, and nobody batted an eye. It wasn't until years later, sometime in the late eighties I think, that this culinary quirk sprang into being.You know, this sounds about right to me. I lived in the Chicago area in the mid-80s, and don't remember there being any issue with putting ketchup on hot dogs at the time.

I think my present antipathy to putting ketchup on hot dogs originates from Cecil's 1991 column that I linked to above. It evidently made quite an impression on me. ;)

Guinastasia
06-05-2016, 03:05 PM
I like ketchup on MY hot dogs and I don't give a shit who has a problem with it. Ketchup, mustard and onions, sometimes cheese.

Dammit, now I want a hot dog.

Doug K.
06-05-2016, 03:09 PM
Ketchup is for French fries. Keep your tomatoey mitts away from my hot dog! :D

*shudder*
Why would anyone desecrate fries by putting anything other than salt on them?

Guinastasia
06-05-2016, 03:14 PM
You've never had cheese fries? (There's a restaurant here in Pittsburgh that makes fries with cheddar, provolone and bacon bits. It's so freaking bad for you, but so good)

That Don Guy
06-05-2016, 03:39 PM
For chili cheese dogs, French's mustard and chopped raw onion.

The best hot dogs in the world, IMHO, are Chicago-style, made with Vienna franks. Kosher dogs that snap when you bite them waaaay outclass your average supermarket variety. :o
I was never a fan of "old-fashioned" (with thick skin) hot dogs.

As for chili cheese dogs with mustard...so you're the guy that talked Rally's/Checkers into making them that way. In my mind (and Wienerschnitzel's), a "chili cheese dog" is just that - a hot dog with just chili and cheese.

Max the Immortal
06-05-2016, 03:50 PM
Hot dog snobs deserve to be laughed at by everybody.

Chronos
06-05-2016, 04:29 PM
Really good French fries are best with nothing but salt and optionally some malt vinegar. But typical French fries, such as one might get from most fast-food places, are best with ketchup. And chili cheese fries, poutine, etc. are in a category all their own.

terentii
06-05-2016, 05:02 PM
Really good French fries are best with nothing but salt and optionally some malt vinegar. But typical French fries, such as one might get from most fast-food places, are best with ketchup.

When I lived in Czechoslovakia, Friday evenings were for going to The Black Stallion and having dark beer and French fries with tartar sauce. Yum-O! :o

John Mace
06-05-2016, 05:32 PM
I like them with mustard and ketchup,
I always thought that was the norm, in the US that is.

onions and relish. I don't want to miss out on anything.
Oh, yeah! There are few foods that onions don't improve.

Mind's Eye, Watering
06-05-2016, 05:36 PM
Hot dogs with ketchup and finely diced onions. Yum!
Never mustard.

Happy Lendervedder
06-05-2016, 05:52 PM
It was brought to me already prepared. I was hungry. I had few options.

Here's the thing: it was a damn tasty dog. Who knew?

I will no longer arch my eyebrows at anyone who professes enjoyment from such a sandwich.

It's not going to be my default, but I acknowledge that I learned something from the experience.


mmm

The hotdog is no sandwich, sir. How dare you.

dropzone
06-05-2016, 06:32 PM
I like ketchup on the cheap ones that taste like cheap bologna because that's what I put on bologna. Folks what ain't from 'round these parts, or other parts with a strong sausage-making tradition, may not know what a GOOD frankfurter tastes like and can be forgiven their tastes.

Spiderman
06-05-2016, 06:34 PM
I suggest Ketchup is the new Mustard.

Red is the new Yellow Brown



Never mustard.
You forgot the word not; anything else is optional.

Chronos
06-05-2016, 07:11 PM
Eh, if the only mustard available is plain American yellow, you're not missing much by leaving it off.

Now, Cleveland ballpark mustard, that stuff is God's gift to sausages.

Doug K.
06-05-2016, 07:45 PM
You've never had cheese fries? (There's a restaurant here in Pittsburgh that makes fries with cheddar, provolone and bacon bits. It's so freaking bad for you, but so good)

I have. They're abysmal.

panache45
06-05-2016, 07:50 PM
Now, Cleveland ballpark mustard, that stuff is God's gift to sausages.

YES!!! :) But I still prefer ketchup.

pulykamell
06-05-2016, 09:19 PM
Chicagoan reporting in, and I am here to state that the entire "no ketchup on hot dogs" taboo is a running joke that got out of hand.

Growing up, I ate at dozens of Chicago hot dog stands, and had ordered hot dogs with just ketchup and mustard, and nobody batted an eye. It wasn't until years later, sometime in the late eighties I think, that this culinary quirk sprang into being.

The now defunct Harry's Hot Dogs on Franklin and Randolph was a Chicago institution for over fifty years, and a hot dog there with everything automatically included ketchup. If you didn't want ketchup, you had to tell them to leave it off. They weren't the only place in town doing that.

If you want ketchup, ask for it.

Yes! That's the one place where ketchup was standard on a hot dog. Freaked me right out the first time, as it's not usual to expect ketchup on a hot dog here. The only other places I've seen put ketchup as default are Home Depots, and even some of them have gotten with the program and not it's a special request.

The quirk is certainly not late 80s. I mean, I was born in the mid-70s, and ketchup was always by special request here in my neck of the woods as long as I remember hot dogs. "Everything on it" varies by hot dog stand, but always includes mustard, onions, and relish. My hot dog stand also included a pickle spear. No tomatoes. This "buried under salad" thing is exaggerated. There's only a couple stands I know (like Byron's) that truly do a buried under a mound of veggies and greens dog. In my neck of the woods, there was also JR's, which would put fresh cucumber slices on it, too, but it's not typical. The pickle spear can be removed and eaten separately (which is how I do it), so the only topping that's really extraneous on a "full-dressed" Chicago dog as defined by Vienna beef is the tomatoes.

As for asking for ketchup, it depends. There are places like the highly praised Gene & Jude's (or Gene's and Jude's) where they simply don't have ketchup on the premises. But that's the only extreme example I can think of. And they do the simple Chicago dog, with just ketchup, mustard, and relish.

pulykamell
06-05-2016, 09:27 PM
And they do the simple Chicago dog, with just ketchup, mustard, and relish.

The hell did I just write? I mean onions, mustard, and relish. Jimmy's (in Chicago proper, and another one of the hot dog kings) is the same, but they also provide you with a pickle spear.

Wesley Clark
06-05-2016, 09:32 PM
Peanut butter on hot dogs is the way to go. :-)

This weirdly makes sense to me.

burpo the wonder mutt
06-05-2016, 09:35 PM
Baked beans on mine, but I'll settle for Gulden's Spicy Brown in a pinch. Oh, and potato buns.

Face Intentionally Left Blank
06-05-2016, 09:36 PM
Fools! Everyone knows you save your ketchup for a well-done steak!

<ducks>

Some love for beef/kosher hot dogs up-thread. I have to say, for decades I've eaten only beef hot-dogs when given the choice. Then one day I messed up and bought regular hot-dogs. Surprise! The indigestion I inevitably suffered after a dog never appeared! Since then, only the pork snout variety for me. . . with ketchup. Sometimes when I'm feeling crazy, I'll smear a LITTLE yellow mustard on it.

dropzone
06-05-2016, 09:39 PM
The best hot dogs in the world, IMHO, are Chicago-style, made with Vienna franks. Kosher dogs that snap when you bite them waaaay outclass your average supermarket variety. :o FTR, Vienna franks are not kosher. The other day I was not feeling well, so I tossed my daughter a twenty and she went off to Johnny Dog, up the block. Red Hot Chicago's, also not kosher, but a good dog. She came back with one for me that was only relish and ketchup because that's how she likes them. And since they charge a fine for ketchup, I obviously gave her too much money.

Digital is the new Analog
06-05-2016, 09:41 PM
Red is the new Yellow Brown


That works, too.


For the record, I'm a M+K, or plane-no-condiments, guy.
I'll do either.

Wesley Clark
06-05-2016, 09:45 PM
This weirdly makes sense to me.

Having just tried a peanut butter dog, they aren't bad but they taste weird. Not bad, just strange. I guess it is something you have to eat many times before you start to really like it.

panache45
06-05-2016, 09:48 PM
Peanut butter is also good with salami.

dropzone
06-05-2016, 10:21 PM
Peanut butter is excellent with salami. Better than with bologna, which is how I ate it as a kid.

Ají de Gallina
06-05-2016, 10:31 PM
The bit I can't understand: The region of the world where ketchup is considered such an abomination is also the same region where they habitually bury their dogs under so much salad that you can't even find the meat. I mean, I could understand a hot dog purist, who liked them plain, or with only one or two specific condiments. But if you're dumping the entire garden on it, what difference does one more topping make?

Exactly.
According to Wikipedia
"The hot dog is topped with yellow mustard, chopped white onions, bright green sweet pickle relish, a dill pickle spear, tomato slices or wedges, pickled sport peppers and a dash of celery salt"

Really, after 7 condiments, 5 of which are vegetables, declaring ketchup as beyond the pale is ridiculous. Your food, your condiments.

I myself never put ketchup on my hot dogs (I'm more of a mayo, mustard, and matchstick fries), but if you like it, splurge on.

pulykamell
06-05-2016, 11:30 PM
The hell did I just write? I mean onions, mustard, and relish. Jimmy's (in Chicago proper, and another one of the hot dog kings) is the same, but they also provide you with a pickle spear.

Actually, never mind. They don't. For some reason, I thought they did, but they do the other standard traditional Chicago dog, onions, relish, and mustard.

standingwave
06-05-2016, 11:37 PM
The Seattle Dog: cream cheese (that's right, you heard me!), grilled onion, jalapeño peppers and Rooster (Sriracha) Sauce.

Don't judge me!

BigT
06-05-2016, 11:46 PM
The bit I can't understand: The region of the world where ketchup is considered such an abomination is also the same region where they habitually bury their dogs under so much salad that you can't even find the meat. I mean, I could understand a hot dog purist, who liked them plain, or with only one or two specific condiments. But if you're dumping the entire garden on it, what difference does one more topping make?

Ketchup is just that much stronger than everything else. I suspect it's because it has so many of the flavors: salty, sweet, sour, and umami. Only bitter really isn't there.

It's hard to use the right (small) amount of ketchup while also making sure it's evenly spread.

That said, I think putting kraut on a dog is also dumb, for the same reason. That stuff overpowers everything. And yet it's really just sour.

Then again, I don't tend to like sour without enough sweet to balance it out.

Jophiel
06-06-2016, 01:37 AM
Really, after 7 condiments, 5 of which are vegetables, declaring ketchup as beyond the pale is ridiculous. Your food, your condiments.
The argument against ketchup isn't that it's a vegetable but that it's largely sugar. That's why kids put it on everything; because it makes stuff sweeter. The sweetness overpowers the other flavors. Besides, the relish already serves a sweet & vinegar flavor better than ketchup could plus gives some additional texture.

This shouldn't be mistaken for me caring about what you put on your hot dog, of course. Go wild with the ketchup if that's what steams your buns.

needscoffee
06-06-2016, 02:20 AM
I've always preferred ketchup on my hot dogs, along all the rest of the condiments you can throw at them. Hot dogs are so salty that the sweetness of the ketchup helps tone down the saltiness enough to render them edible. Otherwise, they're just too salty to be palatable for me.

GuanoLad
06-06-2016, 02:27 AM
The passion some people have over the "correct" way other people should consume food will always intrigue and amaze me.

nightshadea
06-06-2016, 02:53 AM
heh best weinerschnitzel non chilly dog is the old western dog it had bacon and and bbq sauce on it and I was fine with that
tho

funny thing tho as a kid I hated hot dogs........

terentii
06-06-2016, 03:38 AM
"The hot dog is topped with yellow mustard, chopped white onions, bright green sweet pickle relish, a dill pickle spear, tomato slices or wedges, pickled sport peppers and a dash of celery salt"

You forgot "a sprinkling of Tabasco sauce." :D

terentii
06-06-2016, 03:42 AM
Sauerkraut with Bavarian mustard is good, provided the kraut is well drained and applied sparingly. The hot dogs/sausages should be steamed in the kraut juice. Ausgezeichnet! :cool:

Mean Mr. Mustard
06-06-2016, 05:50 AM
The passion some people have over the "correct" way other people should consume food will always intrigue and amaze me.

I have to believe that virtually all of the It-Must-Be-As-Such declarations - at least in this thread - are good natured trash talk.

I can't believe any of us seriously gives a tortoise testicle about others' condiment preferences.

Right?


mmm

GuanoLad
06-06-2016, 06:39 AM
I have to believe that virtually all of the It-Must-Be-As-Such declarations - at least in this thread - are good natured trash talk. I believe so.

I hope so.

Earl Snake-Hips Tucker
06-06-2016, 09:48 AM
I use ketchup rather sparingly on anyting--eh, not much for sweet condiments--but is there actually antipathy for ketchup among hot dog snobs?

pulykamell
06-06-2016, 09:55 AM
I use ketchup rather sparingly on anyting--eh, not much for sweet condiments--but is there actually antipathy for ketchup among hot dog snobs?

See the National Hot Dog Council (http://www.hot-dog.org/culture/hot-dog-etiquette)'s etiquette guidelines for yourself. Or Cecil's column (http://www.straightdope.com/columns/read/679/why-is-there-no-ketchup-on-a-properly-made-hot-dog). Or Dirty Harry (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F5JIpT4GkyM).

I suppose it depends on what you mean by "actual antipathy," (it's all a bit jocular) but, yes, there's a thing -- and it's NOT just Chicagoans (for example, Cecil's column is from a discussion in Montreal), although it is most vociferously expressed here -- about not putting ketchup on hot dogs.

ThelmaLou
06-06-2016, 09:57 AM
Obviously what's needed is a constitutional amendment protecting the right of all citizens to put ketchup anywhere they want on anything they want. We ketchup people have rights, too! You'll have to pry the bottle from my cold, dead hand! (But be careful where you stand if it's a squeeze bottle.)

Alessan
06-06-2016, 10:28 AM
Agreed!

That said, if you put ketchup on falafel, I will cut you.

Quimby
06-06-2016, 10:45 AM
So now that Ketchup is okay, who can we ostracize? How about those crazy people who put Cole Slaw on their dogs?

Earl Snake-Hips Tucker
06-06-2016, 10:51 AM
^^Yeah, I'm all for that. In fact, cole slaw on any sandwich--but especially hot dogs.

Just Asking Questions
06-06-2016, 11:06 AM
Ketchup on a Hot Dog is an Abomination. Period.

Ask Clint Eastwood.

Hrumpf. He can sit there in front of his empty chair and complain about his empty hot dog all day if her wants.

Me, I'm adding ketchup. Or even catsup.

Intergalactic Gladiator
06-06-2016, 01:01 PM
Obviously what's needed is a constitutional amendment protecting the right of all citizens to put ketchup anywhere they want on anything they want. We ketchup people have rights, too! You'll have to pry the bottle from my cold, dead hand! (But be careful where you stand if it's a squeeze bottle.)

That will just open up the door for pervert men to jump out and squeeze ketchup on the foods of our innocent little girls. If you're in favor of that, you're a monster.



Semi seriously though, I live in Chicago, most of the Chicago hot dog places I've been to will put ketchup on your hot dog with little guff. The traditional Chicago dog doesn't have ketchup and it's on all the posters and all but you're not going to get struck down by a bolt of lightning for putting it on. I see more back and forth on this board about ketchup on hot dogs than I have ever seen in Chicago.

If I'm at a hot dog stand and I order a traditional Chicago dog, I'll have it without ketchup but if I'm at a cook out or something, I usually put ketchup on it.

Chisquirrel
06-06-2016, 01:43 PM
^^Yeah, I'm all for that. In fact, cole slaw on any sandwich--but especially hot dogs.

Cole slaw with some kick is pretty much required for BBQ pork sandwiches. I refuse to believe otherwise.

Peremensoe
06-06-2016, 02:16 PM
I see more back and forth on this board about ketchup on hot dogs than I have ever seen in Chicago.

It's not about Chicago. It's about adulthood.

Ukulele Ike
06-06-2016, 02:38 PM
The Seattle Dog: cream cheese (that's right, you heard me!), grilled onion, jalapeño peppers and Rooster (Sriracha) Sauce.
I've had cream cheese on a hot dog at Crif Dogs, a hipster joint on the Lower East Side of Manhattan.

You can get cole slaw on a dog at Papaya King on 82nd and Third Avenue. Which I also enjoyed. Isn't slaw a Pittsburgh thing, though?

I had a couple of Chicago-style dogs at Al's Italian Beef on Taylor Street (Chicago) last week, which were kinda blah. I suppose one shouldn't cross that boundary...I would never order a beef at a hot dog place.

Jophiel
06-06-2016, 03:56 PM
I just had two dogs with mustard, onion, tomato, pickle, relish & celery salt and they were heavenly. All you "There's a garden on my hot dog" people are crazy in your heads. A great mixture of tastes and textures. It probably helps that the hot dogs were being served at the butcher's shop who made them.

They did have ketchup on the counter though.

Alessan
06-06-2016, 04:47 PM
It's not about Chicago. It's about adulthood.

Haven't you heard? It's OK to like kid's stuff now. You can be a card-carrying, tax-paying adult, and still like video games, superhero movies and ketchup on your hot dogs. The Grownup Police won't come and lock you away.

bobot
06-06-2016, 05:23 PM
Hrumpf. He can sit there in front of his empty chair and complain about his empty hot dog all day if her wants.

Me, I'm adding ketchup. Or even catsup.

Ha ha, yeah. I might try a dog with ketchup just out of spite. Up yours, Eastwood!
(I'll get another with mustard, onion, and celery salt; you know, as a palate cleanser!)

pulykamell
06-06-2016, 05:47 PM
You can get cole slaw on a dog at Papaya King on 82nd and Third Avenue. Which I also enjoyed. Isn't slaw a Pittsburgh thing, though?

It may or may not be (I don't know), but it's definitely a West Virginia thing, on a chili dog with mustard and onions. I haven't been to West Virginia, but I've tried this variation at home and it's actually quite good. For me, I really don't give that much a shit about the condiments (although I eschew ketchup on a hot dog in most, but not all, cases) -- I just want a natural casing dog. My main exception is hot dogs like Sonoran dogs or Coney Islands or Cincinnati style dogs where the chili and cheese overwhelm the dog and it doesn't matter so much.

Chronos
06-06-2016, 07:38 PM
Quoth standingwave:

The Seattle Dog: cream cheese (that's right, you heard me!), grilled onion, jalapeño peppers and Rooster (Sriracha) Sauce.

Don't judge me!
I judge you not guilty, because that sounds delicious.

If it's a good dog, my preference is for the afore-mentioned ballpark mustard, plus kraut and grilled onions. Possibly relish, especially if it's my family's recipe for green tomato relish. But if it's the cheap-o kind I usually buy, yeah, ketchup goes on there too.

And seriously, any of you guys who consider yourselves hot dog connoisseurs, you simply must try Cleveland ballpark mustard if you haven't already. We don't have much in the way of signature foods, but by golly, we have that.

Earl Snake-Hips Tucker
06-06-2016, 07:54 PM
My big beef with some of these hot do combos is that in my experience most places don't give a big enough piece of bread to accommodate all of the toppings, so they sorta cascade down the sides. If I were making my own, I'd probably use a hollowed-out baguette.

beowulff
06-06-2016, 09:50 PM
Back when I used to eat hot dogs, I discovered the ultimate in over-the-top hot dog, the Sonoran Dog (http://www.sunset.com/food-wine/fast-fresh/new-essentials-sonoran-hot-dog).

Truly a messy-dog lover's delight, purists be damned!

pulykamell
06-06-2016, 09:52 PM
Back when I used to eat hot dogs, I discovered the ultimate in over-the-top hot dog, the Sonoran Dog (http://www.sunset.com/food-wine/fast-fresh/new-essentials-sonoran-hot-dog).

Truly a messy-dog lover's delight, purists be damned!

Long beat you to it in post 7, and, I agree, tasty dog!

Intergalactic Gladiator
06-06-2016, 10:38 PM
I just had two dogs with mustard, onion, tomato, pickle, relish & celery salt and they were heavenly. All you "There's a garden on my hot dog" people are crazy in your heads. A great mixture of tastes and textures. It probably helps that the hot dogs were being served at the butcher's shop who made them.

They did have ketchup on the counter though.

A lot of the signs and marketing material for Chicago dogs say it was "dragged through the garden (http://www.hotdogchicagostyle.com/chicagodog.php)."

pulykamell
06-06-2016, 10:42 PM
A lot of the signs and marketing material for Chicago dogs say it was "dragged through the garden (http://www.hotdogchicagostyle.com/chicagodog.php)."

I've lived in Chicago practically my whole life (I'm 40), and I've never seen them advertised as "dragged through the garden." It is a phrase that is familiar to us, but I've never seen it officially used. For a true "dragged through the garden dog," there's Byron's, which a fully dressed dog is: "All sandwiches served with mustard, relish, onions, lettuce, tomato, green pepper, cucumber, pickle and celery salt. (ketchup & hot peppers on request)" Now that is truly dragged through the garden. I find it terrible but, hey, if you feel like you're not getting enough veggies, go for it. A regular "Chicago dog" is just normal hot dog toppings with the addition of tomatoes and a pickle spear which does not have to be eaten with the dog itself (I almost always remove it and eat it separately, as I would with a normal sandwich.) Then there's celery salt and poppy seed bun, which have nothing to do with vegetable toppings.

Tim R. Mortiss
06-07-2016, 02:25 AM
I've lived in Chicago practically my whole life (I'm 40), and I've never seen them advertised as "dragged through the garden." It is a phrase that is familiar to us, but I've never seen it officially used. For a true "dragged through the garden dog," there's Byron's, which a fully dressed dog is: "All sandwiches served with mustard, relish, onions, lettuce, tomato, green pepper, cucumber, pickle and celery salt. (ketchup & hot peppers on request)" Now that is truly dragged through the garden. I find it terrible but, hey, if you feel like you're not getting enough veggies, go for it. A regular "Chicago dog" is just normal hot dog toppings with the addition of tomatoes and a pickle spear which does not have to be eaten with the dog itself (I almost always remove it and eat it separately, as I would with a normal sandwich.) Then there's celery salt and poppy seed bun, which have nothing to do with vegetable toppings.

Byron's is my favorite hot dog joint in the whole city, but I always remove about half the toppings (especially the pickle spear and the tomato slices, and usually the sport peppers as well) and eat them with a fork like a side salad.

And by the bye, I don't recall ever getting lettuce or green peppers on them. Or cucumber, other than the pickle spear.

pulykamell
06-07-2016, 02:36 AM
Byron's is my favorite hot dog joint in the whole city, but I always remove about half the toppings (especially the pickle spear and the tomato slices, and usually the sport peppers as well) and eat them with a fork like a side salad.

And by the bye, I don't recall ever getting lettuce or green peppers on them. Or cucumber, other than the pickle spear.

Here's a pic and article for you. (http://chicago.seriouseats.com/2012/03/standing-room-only-byrons.html) I've gotten it, and it came with everything.


The stand is famous for topping its dogs with a literal salad of ingredients. Along with the traditional seven toppings (mustard, onion, relish, dill pickle, tomato slices, sport peppers, and celery salt) that you'll find on a classic Chicago dog, lettuce, green pepper, and cucumber are also added.

And another cite (https://thechicagoelstopfoodhuntproject.com/2012/09/16/byrons-golf-tips-with-my-hot-dog-you-must-have-seen-me-coming/). (ETA: And the quote in my last post was directly from Byron's website.)

snowthx
06-07-2016, 08:18 AM
Blasphemers, all you ketchup people! :D

I can forgive the ketchup, actually. However, not the lettuce, which is probably the evil, disgusting, and worthless iceberg variety. All toppings are a go, but not the lettuce.

Sir T-Cups
06-07-2016, 08:56 AM
It's 9 in the morning and all I want right now is a hot dog. Damn you people.

But not any hotdog. A chili-cheese and onion dog from my college hotdog stand Carter's.

He would grab a literal handful of cheese and plop it right on there...God it was so good.

Tim R. Mortiss
06-07-2016, 12:47 PM
Here's a pic and article for you. (http://chicago.seriouseats.com/2012/03/standing-room-only-byrons.html) I've gotten it, and it came with everything.



And another cite (https://thechicagoelstopfoodhuntproject.com/2012/09/16/byrons-golf-tips-with-my-hot-dog-you-must-have-seen-me-coming/). (ETA: And the quote in my last post was directly from Byron's website.)

Ah, I see the problem. I always ask for "Chicago Style" at Byron's. I forgot that they also offer an "everything on it" dog (for people who think Chicago Style is just to minimalist). That looks like a bit much to me.

pulykamell
06-07-2016, 01:26 PM
Ah, I see the problem. I always ask for "Chicago Style" at Byron's. I forgot that they also offer an "everything on it" dog (for people who think Chicago Style is just to minimalist). That looks like a bit much to me.

Yeah, if you just ask for a hot dog at Byron's, everything, you get the whole salad. Typically, for me, "everything" in Chicago always means at least mustard, relish (not necessarily neon green--few in my area do it with that relish), onions. Then many stands will go the full "Chicago dog" route and add some or all of the rest (fresh tomato, or in Superdawg's case, pickled tomato, pickle spear, celery salt, on a poppy seed bun--sport peppers optional on all dogs--I always specify that I want hot peppers) with a very few (like JR's) including fresh cucumber (JR's does this in lieu of the pickle spear). Note that many of the highly vaunted Chicago-area hot dog stands like Jimmy's Red Hots, Gene and Jude's, Red Hot Ranch, 35th Street Red hots just do the relish, onions, and mustard on a plain bun.) So I was very surprised when an "everything" dog at Byron's included lettuce and green peppers. That is not something I expected, and I believe Byron's is the only hot dog stand that does this. The defunct Harry's mentioned above is another place where I was surprised on the definition of "everything," which included ketchup. I can't think of another typical hot dog stand around here where that's standard on an "everything" dog. (I'm not including places that specialize in Sonoran or other regional dogs, or Home Depots, or things of that nature. I'm just talking your regular Chicago-area hot dog stand.)

Slow Moving Vehicle
06-07-2016, 01:28 PM
Cole slaw with some kick is pretty much required for BBQ pork sandwiches. I refuse to believe otherwise.

Coleslaw on your sandwich is fine, but if you get a really good pulled pork barbecue - Wilber's in Goldsboro, or King's in Kinston - you don't need to add anything to it. Not salt, not extra sauce, not even a bun.

Heaven.

pulykamell
06-07-2016, 01:32 PM
Coleslaw on your sandwich is fine, but if you get a really good pulled pork barbecue - Wilber's in Goldsboro, or King's in Kinston - you don't need to add anything to it. Not salt, not extra sauce, not even a bun.

Heaven.

You certainly don't, but I've moved away from my more purist stance on this, as I like the acidic complement of the coleslaw (any type, creamy, mustard, or vinegar slaw) to the fatty richness of the pulled pork. Fatty foods, to me, need an acidic complement. Now, they might be on the side, but if I don't feel like fiddling with utensils, put it on the sandwich for me. I think it was Morris Grocery in Eads, TN (http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3078/2863932075_fa27815267.jpg) that finally convinced me of this. I was going to, in my usual manner, ask for the coleslaw to be left off, but, for whatever reason, I had a change of heart, and I'm glad I did. One of the best and sloppiest sandwiches I've had in my life. I've semi-seriously considered making the 8.5 hour trip down there from Chicago for a weekend getaway just for that sandwich.

Peremensoe
06-07-2016, 05:59 PM
I like the acidic complement of the coleslaw (any type, creamy, mustard, or vinegar slaw) to the fatty richness of the pulled pork. Fatty foods, to me, need an acidic complement.

Decent slaw also adds texture.

Chronos
06-07-2016, 06:28 PM
Quoth snowthx:

I can forgive the ketchup, actually. However, not the lettuce, which is probably the evil, disgusting, and worthless iceberg variety. All toppings are a go, but not the lettuce.
Iceberg lettuce has no business on or in anything. I still can't figure out why that stuff even exists.

Spud
06-07-2016, 07:26 PM
It's not about Chicago. It's about adulthood.

I'm in my 50's
I own my own home
I've raised three kids and am now putting them through college
I've been voting since the Reagan era
I don't get carded when buying liquor
My "salt and pepper" beard is more salt than pepper
I spend money on things I don't even want... like vacuum cleaners
I worry about saving for retirement

I like ketchup on my hot dog.

<drops mic>

Earl Snake-Hips Tucker
06-07-2016, 08:07 PM
Decent slaw also adds texture.There's the rub. Most cole slaw is Mafia Cole Slaw (http://boards.straightdope.com/sdmb/showthread.php?t=534586). You can't always rely on cole slaw being good or the god-awful watery generic stuff.

Jeep's Phoenix
06-07-2016, 08:17 PM
Coleslaw on your sandwich is fine, but if you get a really good pulled pork barbecue - Wilber's in Goldsboro, or King's in Kinston - you don't need to add anything to it. Not salt, not extra sauce, not even a bun.

Heaven.
Goldsboro, huh...did you ever make it down to Grady's in Dudley? I love the flavor/texture of barbecue and cole slaw, but the slaw tends to dissolve the bun if it's put on a sandwich.

Also, I found a nice smokey barbecue ketchup (no relation to the barbecue discussed above) that's absolutely wonderful on a hot dog.

Iceberg lettuce has no business on or in anything. I still can't figure out why that stuff even exists.
One of my mom's older cousins loves the stuff, and thinks it's the only basis for any salad -- especially a "toss" salad.

pulykamell
06-07-2016, 08:25 PM
Iceberg lettuce has no business on or in anything. I still can't figure out why that stuff even exists.

It's like crunchy water, and, sometimes, that's exactly what I want: texture and moisture without adding too much flavor. It's refreshing, which most salad greens are not. (Don't get me wrong--I like my arugula and endive and dandelion greens and whatnot, but they don't belong anywhere near a meat sandwich for me. Make a BLT with anything but iceberg and I'm likely to punch you in the face. OK, maybe romaine hearts are okay, but that's it.)

Chronos
06-07-2016, 08:54 PM
If you just want bland crunchy, then celery works much better. And a BLT is exactly the sort of situation where you don't want iceberg: You've already got crunchy from the bacon, and you need a more robust flavor to work with the the bacon and tomato.

HeXen
06-07-2016, 09:04 PM
I hate...hate hotdogs. But I can do Angus, all beef hotdogs, they don't have that horrid after taste that regular dogs do.

pulykamell
06-07-2016, 09:20 PM
If you just want bland crunchy, then celery works much better. And a BLT is exactly the sort of situation where you don't want iceberg: You've already got crunchy from the bacon, and you need a more robust flavor to work with the the bacon and tomato.

No, celery has far too strong a flavor for most things where I want iceberg lettuce (and how are they comparable? One is leafy and crunchy, the other is stalky and crunchy. They don't work in the same situations at all. I could see celery and water chestnuts and perhaps jicama being comparable in that manner, but not iceberg lettuce.) And we'll agree to disagree about the BLT. I want that crunchy wateriness there. Romaine hearts are the only acceptable substitute. Well, I can maybe seeing endive working, but we're getting a bit fancy here, then.

Spud
06-07-2016, 09:40 PM
I can maybe seeing endive working, but we're getting a bit fancy here, then.

That would be a B La-De-Dah T.

standingwave
06-07-2016, 10:46 PM
How about ketchup on sushi?

Faux pas or daring innovation?

Johnny L.A.
06-07-2016, 10:49 PM
I'm going to nuke a quarter-pound Hebrew National hot dog for dinner. I haven't decided if I'll eat it plain with catsup, or on a sandwich with American cheese, mayo, and Sriracha sauce.