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View Full Version : I've been enjoying my scrambled eggs wrong.


Biggirl
06-12-2016, 02:02 PM
According to the experts over at The Food Network, perfectly scrambled eggs are a thin-ish sheet of uniform yellowness. Now, a thin-ish sheet of uniform yellowness is not offensive-- unlike my sister-in-law's favored soft, globby mess of wetness with whites plainly visible.

My idea of perfect scrambled eggs are firm and curd-like with a touch of brown along the edges and where the curds last touched the pan.

For mix-ins I prefer sauteed chopped onions and/or garlic. Mushrooms are also quite tasty. And I will not complain if there is a slice of American cheese melted across the top. Cheddar will do also.

Common Tater
06-12-2016, 02:10 PM
I like to pour in a glug of (whole) milk the scramble mix, makes a lot fluffier egg. The stir thoroughly with a fork, or a whisk, for you sophisticated bastards. Stir thoroughly though, is the important part.

The scrambled egg is a great food, but an amazing number of people fuck it up. Use lots of butter, and a cast iron pan or no-stick teflon. It only takes a few minutes. I'm hungry, better get started.

Biggirl
06-12-2016, 02:22 PM
I like to pour in a glug of (whole) milk the scramble mix, makes a lot fluffier egg. The stir thoroughly with a fork, or a whisk, for you sophisticated bastards. Stir thoroughly though, is the important part.

The scrambled egg is a great food, but an amazing number of people fuck it up. Use lots of butter, and a cast iron pan or no-stick teflon. It only takes a few minutes. I'm hungry, better get started.

I agree. A glug of whole milk is essential. I use butter or, if I have some handy, bacon grease.

jz78817
06-12-2016, 02:27 PM
if you enjoy preparing food a certain way, don't bother with anyone who says "UR DOIN IT RONG." Just because someone else has a different way doesn't mean your way is incorrect.

Biggirl
06-12-2016, 02:33 PM
if you enjoy preparing food a certain way, don't bother with anyone who says "UR DOIN IT RONG." Just because someone else has a different way doesn't mean your way is incorrect.

Yeah, good advice. Thanks.

So, uh, how do you like your eggs?

kanicbird
06-12-2016, 03:13 PM
Once you mix stuff in, such as onions, you now have a scrambler, and no longer should be calling it scrambles eggs.

If it's thin and flat, it's an omelet, just without the stuffing.

Scrambles eggs should be broken egg pieces, mostly with some white/yellow differentiation, actually that is the classic way as it is scrambled in the pan, not in a bowl ahead of time.

If it's a consistent color, that is not scrambled eggs anymore, it's premixed 'carton egg product' style eggs.

Qadgop the Mercotan
06-12-2016, 03:36 PM
I like mine scrambled nice and fluffy with milk, salt and pepper added, then turned into a toasted scrambled egg sandwich with butter and ketchup. Comfort food of my childhood, I've not eaten it that way in decades, though.

RealityChuck
06-12-2016, 03:53 PM
Mine are cooked at medium heat until it forms good-sized curds. Just eggs and a tablespoon of milk. I don't pay any attention to the color -- if there's a bit of white, it doesn't matter.

Digital is the new Analog
06-12-2016, 03:56 PM
If I'm ordering it a restaurant, it's either a ham and cheese omelette, or over easy. At home, sometimes I'll chop up whatever sausage I have in the fridge (either andouille or chicken/apple) and either make an omelette or with scrambled eggs.

Keep your veggies out of my eggs. They don't belong there.

FairyChatMom
06-12-2016, 03:57 PM
Will I be mocked and ridiculed if I admit to "scrambling" my eggs in the microwave? It's my quick and easy breakfast - while the toast is toasting, I whip up the eggs and milk in a bowl, then zap it for 45 seconds. By then, the toast is ready to be buttered, with a slice of provolone on one side. If needed, the eggs get another 10 seconds, then the perfectly round mass is slid on top of the cheese, lightly salted, and topped with the buttered bread.

Yum!

Biggirl
06-12-2016, 03:59 PM
Will I be mocked and ridiculed if I admit to "scrambling" my eggs in the microwave? It's my quick and easy breakfast - while the toast is toasting, I whip up the eggs and milk in a bowl, then zap it for 45 seconds. By then, the toast is ready to be buttered, with a slice of provolone on one side. If needed, the eggs get another 10 seconds, then the perfectly round mass is slid on top of the cheese, lightly salted, and topped with the buttered bread.

Yum!

You know what I noticed about you, Fairy? You are nothing if not efficient!

Little Nemo
06-12-2016, 04:01 PM
I like to crack two eggs into the hot pan and then stir them around. I want the final product to be a mixture of white and yolk rather than too homogeneous.

Little Nemo
06-12-2016, 04:03 PM
Will I be mocked and ridiculed if I admit to "scrambling" my eggs in the microwave? It's my quick and easy breakfast - while the toast is toasting, I whip up the eggs and milk in a bowl, then zap it for 45 seconds. By then, the toast is ready to be buttered, with a slice of provolone on one side. If needed, the eggs get another 10 seconds, then the perfectly round mass is slid on top of the cheese, lightly salted, and topped with the buttered bread.Maybe it's the dishes I use but I've often have problems with the eggs sticking to the dish when I cook them in a microwave.

FairyChatMom
06-12-2016, 04:03 PM
I am efficient in some things and slovenly in other, but I'm certainly not going to share my less-than-perfection with Teh Intrarwebz!

As for the bowl, it's Corelle, and a little bit of egg sticks, but that just means the dog gets to lick the bowl as I eat my sammich!

Little Nemo
06-12-2016, 04:06 PM
You know what goes great in scrambled eggs? Olives (the green ones with pimentos (http://img.foodnetwork.com/FOOD/2012/09/26/HE_olives_s4x3_lead.jpg)). You slice some up coarsely and throw them in with the eggs as you fry them.

Little Nemo
06-12-2016, 04:08 PM
As for the bowl, it's Corelle, and a little bit of egg sticks, but that just means the dog gets to lick the bowl as I eat my sammich!See, that would never work for me. I live in New York and your dog's in Maryland.

Unintentionally Blank
06-12-2016, 04:10 PM
There's my problem...I like my scrambled eggs over-easy.

TriPolar
06-12-2016, 04:11 PM
For scrambled I don't care that much which way they're made, but of the choices I'd go with well stirred, no milk or cold water, much like the uniform thin sheet described in the OP. The eggs will be soft and flavorful that way.

The Other Waldo Pepper
06-12-2016, 04:18 PM
You know what goes great in scrambled eggs?

Sour cream.

Omega Glory
06-12-2016, 04:25 PM
I like mine wrong, too. Let the white coagulate a bit, then break it up with a fork, and stir it into the runny yolk.

Left Hand of Dorkness
06-12-2016, 04:47 PM
I scramble slow, just salt and pepper (or no pepper if I'm feeding my kids, who don't know a good thing when they eat it). Butter or bacon grease or sausage grease; the last is my favorite. That and a buttermilk biscuit is the breakfast of fat champions.

Count Blucher
06-12-2016, 05:15 PM
According to the experts over at The Food Network, perfectly scrambled eggs are a thin-ish sheet of uniform yellowness. Now, a thin-ish sheet of uniform yellowness is not offensive-- unlike my sister-in-law's favored soft, globby mess of wetness with whites plainly visible.

My idea of perfect scrambled eggs are firm and curd-like with a touch of brown along the edges and where the curds last touched the pan.

For mix-ins I prefer sauteed chopped onions and/or garlic. Mushrooms are also quite tasty. And I will not complain if there is a slice of American cheese melted across the top. Cheddar will do also.

You Are a Valkyrie from Valhalla and I bow to your delicious breakfast food.

If you should ever get bored, however, mix your recipe fully and raw into a bowl with a table spoon of Worcestershire Sauce. After mixing again, wrap paper towels around the bowl (across the top, of course). Proceed to microwave the dish for 2 min per egg.

After, spoon all the cooked food out onto a plate. Fold on strips of one individual slice of cheese across the top. (Dashes of hot sauce or Habanero strips under the cheese for heat)
Microwave for 30 seconds more (or until you see the cheese melt).

You'll want a cold drink with this; if its OJ, use a tall glass & ice cubes.

Enter the Flagon
06-12-2016, 05:25 PM
According to the experts over at The Food Network, perfectly scrambled eggs are a thin-ish sheet of uniform yellowness. Now, a thin-ish sheet of uniform yellowness is not offensive-- unlike my sister-in-law's favored soft, globby mess of wetness with whites plainly visible.

My idea of perfect scrambled eggs are firm and curd-like with a touch of brown along the edges and where the curds last touched the pan.

For mix-ins I prefer sauteed chopped onions and/or garlic. Mushrooms are also quite tasty. And I will not complain if there is a slice of American cheese melted across the top. Cheddar will do also.

Now I'm actually sorry I only had corned beef hash for breakfast. And I love corned beef hash.

Little Nemo
06-12-2016, 05:46 PM
You'll want a cold drink with this; if its OJ, use a tall glass & ice cubes.Ideally the orange juice should start the morning inside some oranges, not in a carton or bottle.

Little Nemo
06-12-2016, 05:47 PM
Sour cream.I'll have to give that a try.

foolsguinea
06-12-2016, 06:13 PM
According to the experts over at The Food Network, perfectly scrambled eggs are a thin-ish sheet of uniform yellowness.That's an omelet.

Doug K.
06-12-2016, 06:13 PM
Once you mix stuff in, such as onions, you now have a scrambler, and no longer should be calling it scrambles eggs.

If it's thin and flat, it's an omelet, just without the stuffing.

Scrambles eggs should be broken egg pieces, mostly with some white/yellow differentiation, actually that is the classic way as it is scrambled in the pan, not in a bowl ahead of time.

If it's a consistent color, that is not scrambled eggs anymore, it's premixed 'carton egg product' style eggs.

For that matter they cease to be scrambled eggs if you add milk. Scrambled eggs is a single ingredient dish. Salt or pepper is fine, but ONLY if added by the diner at the table. They should never be cooked in, or added by anyone other than the consumer of said eggs.

That's not to say you can't make a tasty dish by mixing eggs with other things. You just need to understand that it won't be scrambled eggs.

enipla
06-12-2016, 06:13 PM
Will I be mocked and ridiculed if I admit to "scrambling" my eggs in the microwave? It's my quick and easy breakfast - while the toast is toasting, I whip up the eggs and milk in a bowl, then zap it for 45 seconds. By then, the toast is ready to be buttered, with a slice of provolone on one side. If needed, the eggs get another 10 seconds, then the perfectly round mass is slid on top of the cheese, lightly salted, and topped with the buttered bread.

Yum!Not mocked at all. Except you're doing it wrong. ;)

First, zap some frozen tator tots in a tuperware. This is your carbs and oil for the egg. Add egg, and 'lil smokies sausages. Microwave as desired.

Works great to cook about half way, and then finish cooking at work.

Bingo.

Wallaby
06-12-2016, 06:59 PM
For mix-ins I prefer sauteed chopped onions and/or garlic. Mushrooms are also quite tasty. And I will not complain if there is a slice of American cheese melted across the top. Cheddar will do also.

There is one problem with mushrooms. If you like a light, fluffy scrambled egg (like I do), you use some milk (sorry to the food pedants, but it's just breakfast, OK?).

Well, some mushrooms turn the resulting concoction grey. That's right, you are now eating grey fluff. It tastes absolutely wonderful, but your mind is cast back to all that asbestos insulation from your primary school.

Little Nemo
06-12-2016, 07:15 PM
That's an omelet.I thought in order to qualify as an omelet, you had to beat some air into the eggs so they would puff up during the cooking. If they're a thin sheet, they're not an omelet.

samclem
06-12-2016, 10:02 PM
I thought in order to qualify as an omelet, you had to beat some air into the eggs so they would puff up during the cooking. If they're a thin sheet, they're not an omelet.

Many many restaurants and people think that an omelet is flat. You and I disagree with them.

movingfinger
06-13-2016, 01:34 AM
Mix in some white wine instead of milk or water. Try chopped green chiles.

pulykamell
06-13-2016, 11:09 AM
I do scrambled eggs any of a number of ways. Typically, I usually either go the "pan scrambled" method (this is what I learned from watching my Polish father and mother scramble eggs growing up), or a high-heat French omelet sort of method.

With pan scrambled eggs, I preheat the pan to medium heat, crack in a couple eggs, and lightly scramble them in the pan, leaving bits of white and yellow, so it's not a homogenous mass.

The other method I use is to heat to medium-high heat, add oil, wait for it to shimmer. Meanwhile, I crack two eggs in a bowl with some salt and pepper, and then whisk them until they're uniformly yellow. Throw in pan, move the eggs around a bit as the bottom layer sets, and remove when done quickly to serve on a plate. Takes about 45 seconds. This is similar to making a classic French omelet or country style omelet, but the eggs are scrambled. (With a classic French omelet, you shake the pan and swirl the eggs, but let them settle into a pancake type mass before folding them over into its distinct shape. Country style is similar but you pull back the eggs from the sides as they cook and tilt the pan so the uncooked eggs get into the spaces left behind.)

August West
06-13-2016, 12:14 PM
Scramble in the pan, add the milk or cream at the end to stop the cooking process.

I learned that from Julia Child, who learned it at Le Cordon Bleu. Come at me.

OffByOne
06-13-2016, 12:22 PM
Here's how I was trained to cook scrambled eggs (I also learned how to cook over easy, over hard, sunny-side up, and coddled, but those require a flat griddle; I can cook scrambled eggs in a frying pan):

Two medium eggs, broken into a bowl, with about 2 tablespoons of whole milk. A tablespoon of butter in a warm (NOT hot! I use 4/10 on my electric stove)) frying pan, melting while I whip the eggs. Once they start to froth, I pour the whole bowl into the frying pan.

The next step is important: leave them eggs alone!

You can stir and stir the eggs while they cook, but in my experience, when cooked that way, they come out in tiny bits that are best eaten with a spoon.

After a minute or so (I usually slice a tomato, plus a few other tasks while I wait), I stir the eggs, just to get a feel for how done they are. Once I am convinced that they are thoroughly cooked, I use a soft spatula/scraper to plate them.

Just Asking Questions
06-13-2016, 12:32 PM
I know people like different things; that's fine. But if I came to some of you folk's house for breakfast, asked for scrambled eggs, and was served some of these concoctions, I'd, well...I'd be polite. But they aren't scrambled eggs! Mushrooms? Onions? Sausage? Olives? Wine? If I wanted an omelet, I would have asked for one. :)

Scrambled eggs are just eggs cooked so they are fluffy chunks. No water, no milk, no nuttin'. Simplicity.

ETA: OffByOne, I use no milk, but I constantly stir mine. They make medium chunks more than spoon chunks, but otherwise I am in agreement.

Skywatcher
06-13-2016, 12:43 PM
That's an omelet.

I thought in order to qualify as an omelet, you had to beat some air into the eggs so they would puff up during the cooking. If they're a thin sheet, they're not an omelet.

Many many restaurants and people think that an omelet is flat. You and I disagree with them.I believe the proper term is "loose omelet".

Inner Stickler
06-13-2016, 12:51 PM
I like to crack the egg into a cup, give it a few good whisks with a fork and toss it into a greased hot pan for a minute or two. I find that low heat and long cooking times draws the water out of the eggs and then I have to overcook them if they're going to be firm. So I do hot and short and I think they end up looking and tasting pretty good.

Usually when I do scrambled eggs, I'm making breakfast sandwiches so I pour the egg into a greased mason jar lid ring so that the egg makes a nice circular patty.

swampspruce
06-13-2016, 01:04 PM
I follow the directions I found in Pop Mech (http://www.popularmechanics.com/home/how-to/a11062/how-to-make-eggs-17087598/) and they turn out the best omelettes and scrambled eggs I've ever had/made.

VunderBob
06-13-2016, 01:14 PM
Screw the Food Network. The proper way to enjoy scrambled eggs, or any other food, is the way *YOU* like it.

That annoys me as much as the stuff I see in Facebook or liked to by the Fox News website, "15 doohickeys you should never umptysquat..."

nightshadea
06-13-2016, 01:24 PM
its even more confusing when other countries ideas of eggs are different......

Like I stayed at one of my dads Asian friends one weekend and found out their idea of an omelette is our scrambled eggs with stuff mixed in

when we took them to a "country kitchen" restaurant and ordered them the normal omelet for the place (a 6 eggs build your own affair) it was as big as a dinner plate and 3 inches thick took all four of them to eat it ...........

I'm told these days "American omelets are popular .....

JohnGalt
06-13-2016, 01:31 PM
Sour cream.

Watch who you say that to; you wouldn't like to end up like this guy (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LhEv4-2SAVU) (at 1:51; he gets his at the end of the clip).

When I get scrambled eggs at a restaurant and it comes out as a flat sheet of yellow, I think they are using a factory-boxed homogenized egg product. Real eggs should look like eggs. Scrambled eggs require some fluffing with a fork while cooking over low heat. Bits of white with no brown edges please.

Biggirl
06-13-2016, 01:54 PM
That's an omelet.

No, it's scrambled eggs. (https://tummymeetsfood.files.wordpress.com/2015/07/cheesyeggdesal-2.jpg)

amaguri
06-13-2016, 02:20 PM
According to many "noted foodies," the right way to cook eggs leaves them slightly wet and custard-y. As a result, I can't take them seriously.

Scrambled eggs don't have to be DRY but they shouldn't be drippy.

Biggirl
06-13-2016, 02:22 PM
According to many "noted foodies," the right way to cook eggs leaves them slightly wet and custard-y. As a result, I can't take them seriously.

Scrambled eggs don't have to be DRY but they shouldn't be drippy.

Then they'd love my sis-in-laws goop.

brainstall
06-13-2016, 02:37 PM
I know I'm doing it wrong and I don't care.

Put a cast iron pan on the burner and let it heat on low for a while. Crack two eggs in a bowl. Add a little butter to the pan, and then use the spatula to mix up the eggs a little before pouring them into the pan. Swirl and then move the cooked eggs gently so the rest of the eggs cook too. Start to push everything to the center of the pan so its the same size as the toast it's going to be served on. Let that side cook until done and then flip so the other side cooks and drop a piece of cheese on top. A slice of process cheese, if I'm in a hurry, real cheddar if I have a bit more time. That will melt while the toast is toasting. Slide onto toast and eat. I like a touch of HP Sauce and a good grinding of pepper.

ZipperJJ
06-13-2016, 03:02 PM
I'm with FairyChatMom - microwave! The key for me is to spray up the bowl with Pam first. Spray the bowl, crack in two eggs, add a dash of water, scramble them up, cover with wax paper, cook 30 seconds, cook another 30 seconds. Eggs!

It comes out of the bowl in a lovely bowl-sized disc, perfect for plopping between two large slices of bread.

Rushgeekgirl
06-13-2016, 03:52 PM
I only make scrambled eggs when I'm doing breakfast for dinner so there's pancakes as well. I add a spoonful of prepared pancake batter to eggs and whisk it a little. I think my mom did this too. I don't know where else I'd get the idea. I like to add salt, pepper, and onion powder. The pancake mix is slightly sweet so there's a nice little blend of flavors. Everyone loves my eggs, whether they're called scrambled or not.

Ooh edited to add that I just stir them a bit in the pan til they're fluffy and not too dry, but no longer really wet. They have a faintly custard mouthfeel.

SykoSkotty
06-13-2016, 04:02 PM
Interesting takes on a classic dish - am I the only one who likes to season my scrambled eggs with hot sauce?

I enjoy green Tabasco, with salt & pepper, maybe some shredded cheddar and a side of crispy bacon.

Also, here's an almost weird way to make scrambled eggs via Gordon Ramsay:

You don't break the yolk? (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PUP7U5vTMM0)

Biggirl
06-13-2016, 04:21 PM
Gordon didn't make scrambled eggs. He made grits and is punking everyone.

Richard Pearse
06-15-2016, 04:08 PM
I like to add about a teaspoon of cream per egg for mine. Then it gets cooked enough to just hold together, I like it to be almost runny in places that haven't touched the cooking surface.

I agree that many of the descriptions here are closer to omelets than scrambled eggs. On the other hand any predominantly egg dish where the eggs are literally scrambled, could claim the scrambled name I guess.

The Other Waldo Pepper
06-15-2016, 04:19 PM
I agree that many of the descriptions here are closer to omelets than scrambled eggs. On the other hand any predominantly egg dish where the eggs are literally scrambled, could claim the scrambled name I guess.

Still, flip that around; even if a given dish of scrambled eggs might, as specified, provoke a "hey, that seems almost like an omelet" reaction, what happens if you instead set those scrambled eggs before a paying customer who'd ordered an omelet?

Richard Pearse
06-15-2016, 04:32 PM
Still, flip that around; even if a given dish of scrambled eggs might, as specified, provoke a "hey, that seems almost like an omelet" reaction, what happens if you instead set those scrambled eggs before a paying customer who'd ordered an omelet?

It is a quandary! Perhaps we need a new word, a "scramblet".

FallingLeaves
06-15-2016, 08:42 PM
Recently, in my attempt to use up some buttermilk I decided to try it instead of the usual tablespoon or two of regular milk in my scrambled eggs. I found it lets them stay big and fluffy, while at the same time I could cook them well done. I don't like my eggs all wet and runny.

(I've also been known to put buttermilk in mashed potatoes instead of regular milk too)