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minlokwat
08-04-2001, 05:13 PM
What minor details in movies do you consider, for lack of a better term, really neat?

I'm talking about something that was added in by a writer or possibly improvised by one of the actors that was not originally intended to be part of the film. Here are two examples.

In The Princess Bride during the wedding ceremony, there is a slow camera pan to the altar. Then, for God knows what reason, the priest begins with the words "Ma-wage..." and conducts the entire ceremony in a bizarre Elmer Fudd-esque accent. Pretty cool. Really makes you wonder whose idea that was.

In Death Becomes Her there is a banquet for all of those who have taken the eternal life pill. The emcee makes an announcement along the lines of "And remember, to all of you who have faked your own deaths, no re-appearing in public just to make cheap headlines," and then there is a cut of The King -Elvis, of course- who mumbles, "Hey, I was just trying to have some fun." A great touch that really works.

What else can you think of?

Ross
08-04-2001, 05:43 PM
Well, it could hardly have been improvised, but I always loved the bit in Men In Black where Tommy Lee Jones introduces a newly suited Will Smith to a couple of alien brothers - I can hardly even remember whether they were separate entities or two hdeads on one body, but they were definitely a tad octopus-like, were sitting down operating some computer gizmo, and Tommy Lee Jones says, "This is BGLUGK! and Bob..."

It's gone very fast. I like that kinda thing.

pesch
08-04-2001, 06:02 PM
Blood Simple -- During the first bar scene, the camera slowly travels down the bar towards the actors. It approaches a drunk, passed out on the bar, and the camera neatly rises up and over the drunk and goes merrily on its way.

Arty as all hell, but still neat to see.

eunoia
08-04-2001, 06:53 PM
I'm not even sure if this was on purpose or not, but in Pee Wee's Big Adventure when Pee Wee gives a lift to the fugitive and their car careens out of control, there is a shot of the car going past some construction barriers. In this shot, you clearly see that the barriers are on wheels and being pulled towards the viewer to give the illusion that the car is moving away. What I thought was neat is that I never noticed it the first time, even though it's so obvious. It's so cheesy, but now it cracks me up every time.

Daniel
08-04-2001, 06:56 PM
The The Princess Bride incident was in the book too. So I figure it was William Goldman's idea.

Some of my faves:

Disney's Hercules - as Meg is falling in love with Hercules, she's kind of denying the emotion and backing away and she backs into a garden sculpture sculpture of Cupid with an arrow; she backs right into the pointy end of the arrow. She feels it, turns to see what poked her, turns back and does this kind of a double take at the absurdity of what just happened. Funniest part of the whole damn movie.

Joe vs The Volcano is a brilliantly written movie by John Patrick Shanley with many subtle elements that don't reveal themselves until the 2nd or 3rd viewing. The opening sequence reveals Joe and everyone else going to work at their most hated job. The company logo is this stylized lightning bolt that kind of follows Joe through the movie; you see the lightning bolt in several scenes that have nothing to do with the company but always represent something dangerous. Anyway the company walkway is in this shape too. There are countless lifeless, spiritless workers slowly dragging their feet into work. It would be so easy to just cut across the logo walkway and walk straight to the door rather than turn and walk pretty much 2-3 times as far just to follow the logo's shape. There's this one guy who goes all the way to the edge of the first bend in the path, and he could be daring and direct and just keep on walking straight to the door rather than to take the turn, but then you see him turn to his right, the mindless drone following the path alongside the other unremarkable bodies being shoved into the office. There is something about that one man that I find so profoundly sad.

okay, this one is going to sound really weird but has anyone seen The Bibleman Adventures: The Incredible Force Of Joy? I bought it as a gag gift for a Jewish friend of mine on his birthday. Well we're watching this, and it has some deliberately cheesy acting and set design on the part of the bad guys. The bad guy's assistant/henchman (imagine a bad actor trying to impersonate Keanu Reeves from his Bill & Ted days . . . ouch) is commenting on the echo in their cave hideout. "This cave has a really wicked echo!" Then he goes to test it, and shouts: FALCOR!. We were laughing so hard the first time we saw it that we didn't hear the echo shout back, ATRAIU!

JosephFinn
08-04-2001, 07:07 PM
In "The Usual Suspects," the nifty moment for me (out of many) is Kevin Spacey lighting the lighter in the detective's office. It's a very quick moment, but it works as a wonderful clue.

JosephFinn
08-04-2001, 07:10 PM
Originally posted by Daniel
"This cave has a really wicked echo!" Then he goes to test it, and shouts: FALCOR!. We were laughing so hard the first time we saw it that we didn't hear the echo shout back, ATRAIU!

I'll freely admit that I don't get it. Please enlighten me?

Johnny L.A.
08-04-2001, 07:14 PM
In Zombie! vs. Mardi Gras I like the scene where the pseudo-intellectual couple are spouting inanities in a diner while Zombie! attacks a man outside the window -- and nobody notices.

In Creature Comforts I think having the animal (capybara?) defecate in the bacground is a good touch.

Shiva
08-04-2001, 07:26 PM
How about Paul Bartel's depan line "You go to bed Honey, I'll bag the Nazi." from Eating Raoul?

Slays me every time.

Lsura
08-04-2001, 07:28 PM
Originally posted by JosephFinn
Originally posted by Daniel
"This cave has a really wicked echo!" Then he goes to test it, and shouts: FALCOR!. We were laughing so hard the first time we saw it that we didn't hear the echo shout back, ATRAIU!

I'll freely admit that I don't get it. Please enlighten me?

The only thing I can think of is the movie Neverending Story, that has a Luckdragon named Falcor, and a hero named Atreyu.

Kamino Neko
08-04-2001, 07:28 PM
Originally posted by JosephFinn
Originally posted by Daniel
"This cave has a really wicked echo!" Then he goes to test it, and shouts: FALCOR!. We were laughing so hard the first time we saw it that we didn't hear the echo shout back, ATRAIU!

I'll freely admit that I don't get it. Please enlighten me?

Watch The Neverending Story - now. You've missed out by not seeing it yet.

lightthelight
08-04-2001, 07:33 PM
"Once Were Warriors" has many wonderful, deft touches. The one that stands out for me is the look in the eyes of the teenage daughter after being raped by her father's drinking buddy; it's only a matter of time before she deals with it the only way she knows how.

JosephFinn
08-04-2001, 08:25 PM
Originally posted by Tengu
Originally posted by JosephFinn
Originally posted by Daniel
"This cave has a really wicked echo!" Then he goes to test it, and shouts: FALCOR!. We were laughing so hard the first time we saw it that we didn't hear the echo shout back, ATRAIU!

I'll freely admit that I don't get it. Please enlighten me?

Watch The Neverending Story - now. You've missed out by not seeing it yet.


Ooooooohhhhhhhhhh!

Thank you.

Medicinal Herb
08-04-2001, 10:00 PM
I think the way the camera shows, from above, the way the visitors and the hosts line up in opposing V formations at the beginning of Kenneth Branagh's Much Ado About Nothing is very cool.

I really love the way Richard Dryfuss says "Hamlet. In love. With the duke's daughter. The duke thinks." in Rosencranz and Guildenstern Are Dead. (I think it's "the duke", but it's been a while since I've seen it.) A lot of people have never even heard of this movie, but it's a real gem. It stars Richard Dreyfuss, Tim Roth and Gary Oldman.

kylen
08-04-2001, 10:10 PM
In Pulp Fiction when Uma Therman is lying on the dealer's floor and John Travolta is about to stab her in the chest with the big@ss needle, there are several boardgames visible on a table in the background including "The Game of Life" and "Operation"

ITR champion
08-04-2001, 10:13 PM
In Monty Python and the Holy Grail, one of the villagers has shaving cream on his face during the witch-burning scene. He's only on screen for about half a second, so you have to look at exactly the right moment. I only noticed that around the tenth time that I watched it.
The line that the monks are chanting tranlates to "This is the beginning of the chant, this is the end of the chant", then they hit themselves on the head. The words in the Holy Hand Grenade scene are exactly the same.
When Sir Robin is travelling alone through the forest, he passes several signs that say things like "Certain death, 3 miles", and they always point in the direction that he's travelling. I missed that during my first few viewings.

Soup_Nazi
08-04-2001, 10:44 PM
One of my favorite little touches in a movie is the scene in Jurassic Park where the big T-Rex leans down and peeks inside the car and the girl plays the flashlight over it's grapefruit-sized eye and the pupil dialates in response to the brightness. Really cool.

ITR champion
08-04-2001, 10:48 PM
That just reminded me of the Jurassic Park scene where Malcolm is in the jeep being chased by the T-rex. He looks in the mirror and all that he can see is a few of the Rex's teeth. Of course, he also sees the words "objects in mirror are closer than they appear".

Spoonbender
08-04-2001, 11:13 PM
In Memento, Leonard has a tattoo on his abdomen - printed upside-down so he can read it when he looks down - that says, "EAT."

In Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade, at one point Indy walks past a drawing on a catacomb wall that depicts the Ark of the Covenant. At that moment, you can hear a few notes of John Williams' Ark theme from the Raiders score.

Kaitlyn
08-05-2001, 12:22 AM
In Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon, Michelle Yeoh is asking Chow Yun Fat why he came back, obviously wanting him to tell her it was because of her (which it was). This is a typical "He's about to tell her he loves her when he's interrupted" scene, but it's filmed differently from most. Early in the scene, we see a servant approaching from the background, unnoticed by either character, so there is never any suspense about whether he will reveal his true feelings; we (the audience) know the whole time that the interruption will come and exactly when it will come, making the whole scene one of sadness. I love it when a director finds a new way to play a stereotypical scene.

In The Bodyguard from Bejing (aka The Defender) Jet Li is the bodyguard of the Christy Chung, girlfreind of a Hong Kong businessman. Li and Chung have fallen in love. In the climactic battle, the villain takes aim at Chung and fires his gun. The boyfriend and Li both race from 8-10 feet behind Chung, outrunning the bullet, the boyfriend chickens out and leaps to the side, and Li jumps in front of Chung, all while the bullet is in the air, taking the bullet intended for her. She catches him, and the villain fires again. As this bullet flies towadrds them, Chung twists around, putting herself in the path; Li, realizing what she has done, turns them again, and takes the second bullet.

I'm also a big fan of the "bullies unwittingly confronting someone way out of their league" moments in action films. There is a good one in Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon when Jen is confronted by the bullies outside the bar, and a great one in Kiss of the Dragon, when the pimp beats up Brigitte Fonda, leading to Jet Li telling him "I would very much appreciate it if you don't do that . . . again." And the move with the pool ball is very cool.

initech
08-05-2001, 03:23 AM
Citizen Kane (lotza stuff in this one, but here's my favorite): The beginning of the movie includes the camera passing through a skylight to introduce the scene. Later, that sequence is repeated, but the skylight has been broken. Presumably by the camera.

silent_rob
08-05-2001, 03:53 AM
In Clerks, Randal and Dante are having a conversation about jizz moppers in nudie booths (specifically what one is and how much they make). Jizz moppers wipe the windows clean in nudie booths. Anyway, as they talk, a customer walks up to the counter. The customer is "highly offended" by hearing this.
However, if you look on the counter, you'll notice that he is buying Windex and paper towels. This brings to mind the question; just what does he plan to do with those purchases?

silent_rob
08-05-2001, 04:08 AM
Thought of a few more:

In Brazil, all of the different signs all over the place: "The Truth Shall Make You Free", "Information - The Key To Prosperity. Ministry Of Information", "Help The Ministry Of Information Help You", "Be Safe: Be Suspicious", "Loose Talk Is Noose Talk", "Suspicion Breeds Confidence".

In Fight Club, the different subliminal shots of Tyler and his appearance in the "Welcome!" clip on the hotel closed-circuit television show, before he is introduced.

Pushkin
08-05-2001, 05:15 AM
Originally posted by Soup_Nazi
One of my favorite little touches in a movie is the scene in Jurassic Park where the big T-Rex leans down and peeks inside the car and the girl plays the flashlight over it's grapefruit-sized eye and the pupil dialates in response to the brightness. Really cool.
Or when the Raptor is attacking Laura Dern in the generator room and its head brushes against the naked light bulb, you can see its skin searing from the heat.
Ray Harryhausen AFAIK did the special effects for a King Kong movie, the one where Kong fights a T-rex and for one brief instant during the fight the T-rex stops, scratches his nose, and continues, neat! Apparantly this was as much a side effect of being locked in a darkened room doing nothing but stop motion filmatography as anything else.
Terminator 2, when the T1000 is smashing up the mall it pauses to look at a shop dummy which looks just like itself, completely silver and featureless.

Johnny L.A.
08-05-2001, 09:44 AM
The line that the monks are chanting tranlates to "This is the beginning of the chant, this is the end of the chant"
Is that true? I always thought they were saying, "He is Jesus the Lord. Give it a rest."

Why A Duck
08-05-2001, 09:54 AM
In Dr. Strangelove, when George C. Scott is walking backwards in the war room and trips, falls, get back up. Classic.

Agrippina
08-05-2001, 10:18 AM
A lot of Stanley Kubrick movies in this post, because he always puts such interesting touches to his movies. Small details, and what not.

During the opening credits of The Shining, you can hear Danny riding his tricycle in the soundtrack. Other neat touches in that movie is Jack's typewriter refills itself during the scene where Wendy is bothering him. When Jack is talking to the ghosts, or meeting one, he's always facing or talking to a mirror.

(I mentioned this in another thread that died) In Toy Story, the carpet outside of Sid's room matches the carpet in The Shining. I love that, and I don't know why.

In A Clockwork Orange, when Alex is in the record shop, you can see an album cover of the soundtrack to 2001: A Space Odyssey. Also, in the same movie, when Alex is being dragged in the country side by Dim and Georgie, the two's helmet numbers are 665 and 667, with Alex in the middle being 666.

In Beetlejuice, I've always loved the part where they're dancing to Day-O and in the background, you can see Lydia cracking up. The camera never focuses on her, but it's a funny sight.

Along the same lines as eunoia mention of Pee-Wee's Big Adventure, I like how in Willy Wonka you can cleary see the string on the glass elevator.

I probably have more, but have to think about it.

lawoot
08-05-2001, 10:57 AM
In "Toy Story", the tool box that the evil kid next door has in his room is labelled for 'Binford'(or something like that)... anyway, it is the company that sponsor's 'Tool Time' on Tim Allen's "Home Improvement"

Agrippina
08-05-2001, 12:10 PM
Originally posted by lawoot
In "Toy Story", the tool box that the evil kid next door has in his room is labelled for 'Binford'(or something like that)... anyway, it is the company that sponsor's 'Tool Time' on Tim Allen's "Home Improvement"

That just reminded me. In Toy Story 2, Jessie the Cowgirl says, "Sweet mother of Abraham Lincoln!" The mother of Lincoln was Nancy Hanks, whom Tom Hanks (Woddy the Cowboy) is related to.

Wait...is that a "touch"?

gobear
08-05-2001, 12:22 PM
Is that true? I always thought they were saying, "He is Jesus the Lord. Give it a rest."

Well, I don't have a copy here to check, but from memory, I'd swear they were chanting Kyrie eleison, miserere Dominus", which translates to "Lord, have mercy" in Greek and Latin.

Which leads to a neat moment in A Fish Called Wanda, when the first little dog is being buried. The boy choristers are singing, [i]Miserere, Dominus. Canis mortuus est, which translates as "Lord, have mercy, the dog is dead."

Katisha
08-05-2001, 12:49 PM
The Monty Python monks are definitely saying Pie Jesu Domine, dona eis requiem, which comes from the Requiem Mass and roughly translates to "Sweet Lord Jesus, give them rest." (Saw it at the movie theater yesterday -- woo-hoo!)

In Baz Luhrmann's Romeo and Juliet, I always liked all the little Shakespeare references on the billboards: Prospero Fine Vintage Whiskey, a strip joint (I think) called Mistress Quickly's, and (my favorite) Rosencrantz's wiener stand.

Finagle
08-05-2001, 12:55 PM
In Roxanne, the Steve Martin remake of Cyrano DeBergerac, Steve Martin's character, C.D., is supposed to be this incredibly bright, sophisticated, but insecure, Renaissance man (with an incredibly long schnozz). There's one scene where he and the hunky dolt Chris are in C.D.'s home that does a wonderful job of establishing C.D.'s character just by the set design. Steve Martin is casually whipping up some gourmet dinner while trying to get Chris to write a love letter, and in the process of panning through the room you get a view of books and models and art -- it's just obviously the room of someone who's smarter than the average bear.

Sublight
08-05-2001, 12:56 PM
This may be a little dark, but Number Six reminded me of something I liked from Bodyguard from Beijing.

In so many movies, there's an annoying little kid who causes no end of trouble for the hero yet manages to waltz through the most dangerous situations without a scratch. In this movie, they shoot the kid! Not fatally, but in the big fight scene at the end, the little brat takes one in the leg. IIRC, he was even doing something annoying that caused him to get shot.

Now, I don't advocate violence in real life, especially against children, but this was such a change from so many other films I'd seen, I couldn't help enjoying it.

--sublight.

ruadh
08-05-2001, 12:59 PM
In The Cook, The Thief, His Wife and Her Lover, the way that Helen Mirren's dress changes colors whenever she walks into a different room.

Actually, I could probably mention a lot of things in Peter Greenaway's films....

occ
08-05-2001, 01:26 PM
Originally posted by eunoia
I'm not even sure if this was on purpose or not, but in Pee Wee's Big Adventure when Pee Wee gives a lift to the fugitive and their car careens out of control, there is a shot of the car going past some construction barriers. In this shot, you clearly see that the barriers are on wheels and being pulled towards the viewer to give the illusion that the car is moving away. What I thought was neat is that I never noticed it the first time, even though it's so obvious. It's so cheesy, but now it cracks me up every time.

I remember this part too, and theres another example from that movie thats in the same vein: near the beginning of the movie, when Pee-Wee goes to the shopping center and chains up his bike, he takes a ridiculous amount of chain out of the "saddlebag" on his bike (the gag being that theres no way he could have that much chain in the saddlebag). However, you can quite clearly see that the chain is really stored beneath the saddlebags, offscreen, and is being pulled up through a hole in the bottom. It's pretty obvious and HAD to be done intentionally.

ToobaTeacher
08-05-2001, 01:34 PM
I just love that Hitchcock appeared in all of his films.

I also love it when big stars do a walk on, like many did for Robert Altman's brilliant spoof of Hollywood "The Player".

Sultan Kinkari
08-05-2001, 01:35 PM
This isn't from a movie but I still thought it was neat.

In Madonna's What it Feels Like(for a girl) video, she slams the door to her motel room, #669; The 9 swings down(held only by the bottom nail) and the room # appears as 666. Very cool. :)

robinh
08-05-2001, 02:01 PM
In the novel Silence of the Lambs, in the scene where Clarisse meets Hannibal, he makes a little speech about what he can tell about her from her appearance, citing her "cheap shoes and good handbag" and her "add-a-bead necklace." In the movie version, which follows the novel fairly closely, Hannibal doesn't use the "add-a-bead necklace" line, but Clarisse is wearing one. I liked that.

Gilligan
08-05-2001, 02:21 PM
In Contact, when there were big crowds around the radio antenna facility, there was a Chevy Vega owners club in the crowd, which I thought was clever. May have been in the book, too, I haven't read it.

In Raiders, when they first open up the Well of Souls, Salla is scared by a carved head that gets lit up by lighning. Then he recovers with "Sorry, Indy."

In the final battle scene of Army of Darkness, Ash chops off a skeleton's head with his sword. The skeleton turns to watch his skull go flying. I don't know how they animated the skeletons for that movie - stop motion or whatever, but I just loved that they made a headless skeleton "look" at his own skull.

Freudian Slit
08-05-2001, 02:22 PM
I always liked the "Objects in Mirror Are Closer..." in JP.
Another thing from JP which I didn't even notice until I went to the Internet Movie Database, is Dennis Nedry's name is an anagram for Nerdy Sinned. I guess that should be attributed more to the book, but still.

Bill and Ted's Excellent Adventure- I really liked how at the end, when they're giving their presentation, they interview Freud. Freud "examines" Ted, and then asks Bill if he'd like to be psychologically examined, too. Bill responds, saying, "Nah, I just have a mild Oedipal complex" an the camera pans to Missy, his hot stepmom. The whole moment was really great for some reason. I liked that even though it's just a "fun" movie, they would include a term that not a lot of people might know. Not something they would do in a more recent flick, IMO.

irishgirl
08-05-2001, 02:39 PM
i love the way the artwork in hana bi mirrors the action.
especially at the end.

and in another film (possibly called fish eyes, i'm not sure) about a gunman in glasses kitano appears in cameo as a dumb yakuza who buys the gun. the opposite of his usual character.

Mofo Rising
08-05-2001, 02:46 PM
Originally posted by eunoia
I'm not even sure if this was on purpose or not, but in Pee Wee's Big Adventure when Pee Wee gives a lift to the fugitive and their car careens out of control, there is a shot of the car going past some construction barriers. In this shot, you clearly see that the barriers are on wheels and being pulled towards the viewer to give the illusion that the car is moving away. What I thought was neat is that I never noticed it the first time, even though it's so obvious. It's so cheesy, but now it cracks me up every time.

It wasn't intentional, unless they were willing to take the joke really far. Tim Burton and Paul Reubens discuss this scene and the bike chain scene in the commentary on the DVD. Burton says it was unintentional, but that the scene had been hailed by several critics as "showing the falsity of moviemaking" or somesuch remark. On the DVD the scenes have been edited so you can no longer see the flubs. A mistake in my book.

Sam Stone
08-05-2001, 02:55 PM
Disney movies are full of self-references. In 'Tarzan', when the apes are trashing the camp the dinnerware set is the same as Angela Lansbury's Teapot in "Beauty and the Beast".

In "Aladdin", when the old sultan is making a tower of toy animals, mixed into the tower are various Disney characters.

In "Hercules", the scene where Herc becomes famous shows a bunch of kids buying toys at the "Hercules Store", which is a direct parody of Disney's own tendency to market the crap out of everything. Nice to see they could laugh at themselves.

In "Star Wars", when the Stormtrooper that Luke knocks out or kills to take his armor is called "THX 1138", which was the name of Lucas's first sf movie. Those letters appear in all kinds of Lucas films.

In 'An American Werewolf in London', the porn movie playing is called, "See you Next Wednesday". John Landis works that title into most of his movies, if I recall correctly. I can't remember why.

Then there are the wacky cameos... John Landis appears as a crazed Iranian in "After Dark". Steven Spielberg is the Cooke County Claims Adjuster at the end of "The Blues Brothers". And in the final jailhouse scene, the crazed convict dancing on the table is Joe Walsh.

Miller
08-05-2001, 04:21 PM
I think that was Frank Oz, not Spielberg, as the claims adjustor in Blues Brothers.

One of my favorites is in the climax of Big Trouble in Little China, when Kurt Russel kisses Kim Catrell and gets her lipstick all over his mouth. It's there for the rest of the scene, including his dramatic show down with Lo Fong ("You're messing with Jack Burton now!" "Who?")

I also loved the scenes in zero g in Final Fantasy. Just can't do that sort of FX properly in a live action film.

pldennison
08-05-2001, 04:26 PM
Originally posted by Miller
I think that was Frank Oz, not Spielberg, as the claims adjustor in Blues Brothers.


Nope, it was Spielberg. Frank Oz is the officer at Joliet who gives Belushi back his personal belongings at the beginning of the movie.

silent_rob
08-05-2001, 04:32 PM
Originally posted by Mofo Rising
It wasn't intentional, unless they were willing to take the joke really far. Tim Burton and Paul Reubens discuss this scene and the bike chain scene in the commentary on the DVD. Burton says it was unintentional, but that the scene had been hailed by several critics as "showing the falsity of moviemaking" or somesuch remark. On the DVD the scenes have been edited so you can no longer see the flubs. A mistake in my book.

The scene with the bikechain (similar situation with the other scene, I believe), when originally shown in theaters, did not show the bikechain coming from below the basket, so the DVD actually didn't edit out the flubs, but restored that scene to what Tim Burton intended, and what was seen in theaters.
The way it worked was that when widescreen movies became popular, some theater owners, in an attempt to cash in on it, used "masking". So if a movie wasn't widescreen, they'd mask the top and bottom to change the aspect ratio to make it seem widescreen. Filmmakers generally hated this because it altered their original vision. However, some filmmakers used this, so they could shoot on cheaper film (with a different ratio from widescreen), but still show it in widescreen. Pee-wee's Big Adventure was one such film.
However, in Europe and on television, they use a different aspect ratio. The critics Burton was talking about in the commentary were in Europe (France, I believe). Burton had no idea the masking wouldn't work in Europe until he actually saw it at a screening, there.
The same thing happened with the subsequent TV showings and video releases of Pee-wee's Big Adventure. Because they were shown in the format it was originally shot in (the same ratio as TV), they didn't bother pan-and-scanning the widescreen (because they didn't have to). So because it wasn't masked, you got to see the whole picture, and the bike-chain thing was revealed.
However, because many people have seen it this way for years, they think that's the way Burton originally had it in the theaters.

Daniel
08-05-2001, 05:12 PM
Originally posted by Sam Stone
Disney movies are full of self-references. In 'Tarzan', when the apes are trashing the camp the dinnerware set is the same as Angela Lansbury's Teapot in "Beauty and the Beast".

Glen Keane, head animator for Tarzan, was also head animator for The Beast. So the the reference in Tarzan is a much stronger connection than simply a random Disney presence.

Guinastasia
08-05-2001, 05:20 PM
In the movie A Time to Kill, when the racists rape the little girl, the camera angle is looking up at their faces, as they would appear to her, which is really disturbing.

In Anastasia, despite numerous inaccuracies, there are some little touches that stand out, such as:

-The picture she draws for her grandmother is an actual picture that the real Anastasia painted for her father.

-The figure of Alexandra dancing with Nicholas in the music box, and when Alexandra's ghost comes out of the painting, she is wearing mauve. Mauve was the real Alexandra's favorite color.

-The "Dream Waltz" scene-all of Anastasia's sisters look like the actual Grand Duchesses. Alexei's ghost limps-something the real Alexei did, as he suffered from hemophilia.

Gundy
08-05-2001, 05:52 PM
There's a scene in the otherwise-mediocre Pacific Heights where one of the characters walks out the door of a hotel in the left side of the shot, then the camera changes focus to something in the foreground - a glass with only ice cubes, which right then shift and clink. It has nothing to do with the story as far as I can see but it's nifty to look at.

Spoonbender
08-05-2001, 07:17 PM
In Pulp Fiction, in the scene where Vincent and Jules are carrying out their hit: while Jules is interrogating Brett, Vincent hangs back and smokes a cigarette - he knows that Jules likes to toy with his victims and that it'll be a few minutes before the shooting starts. Then, when Jules launches into his Ezekiel bit, Vincent (in the background) stubs out his cigarette and gets his gun ready - he knows that Jules' routine is almost finished.

Johnny L.A.
08-05-2001, 07:43 PM
I've always liked the "See no evil, hear no evil, speak no evil" bit in Planet of the Apes.

Robot Arm
08-05-2001, 09:07 PM
The Shakespeare references (six, I think) in L.A. Story.

When I finally saw 2001: A Space Odyssey on a big screen I noticed something that never came across on television. During the entire Dawn of Man sequence, there is absolutely no camera movement until Moonwatcher throws the bone into the air and the camera follows it. I'm sure it was deliberate, any motion of the frame would have implied something smooth and mechanical. When they show this on TV, the pan-and-scan really breaks the mood.

Purd Werfect
08-05-2001, 10:08 PM
In one of the senate scenes from Star Wars: Episode One - The Phantom Menace, (dang, that movie has a lot of title), one of the senate cubicles or pods is filled with ET characters.

In the same movie, when Liam Neeson's character is collecting his winnings from Sebulba, the floating probe sent by Darth Maul passes out of focus in the background, barely visible, thus locating it's prey.

In Predator 2, when Danny Glover's character is inside the creature's ship, one of the hunting trophies on the wall is a skull from one of the creatures in Aliens.

ITR champion
08-05-2001, 10:20 PM
All three of the Naked Gun movies have a lot of nice touches. In 2 and 1/2, there's bar scene near the start that's meant to parody various classic film noire scenes. The pictures on the wall show the Titanic sinking, the Hindenburg disaster, and a Nazi rally. In 33 and 1/3, the police station has the uniforms of famous police officers in frames on the wall. Of course, the frame that's labeled "J Edgar Hoover" has a dress instead.

HelloKitty
08-05-2001, 10:47 PM
Originally posted by Sam Stone
In 'An American Werewolf in London', the porn movie playing is called, "See you Next Wednesday". John Landis works that title into most of his movies, if I recall correctly. I can't remember why.

The "See you next Wednesday" reference is a sort of tribute to Stanley Kubrick that Landis does in all his movies. This line was originally in 2001: A Space Odyssey--Heywood Floyd I believe says this to his daughter when they are talking on the video phone near the beginning of the movie.

A couple other "See you next Wednesday" references:

* On a poster in Jamie Lee Curtis's apartment in Trading Places
* Spoken in the "movie" that Micheal Jackson and his girlfriend are watching in the Thriller video

astro
08-05-2001, 10:55 PM
The Pee-Wee's Big Adventure scene where Pee-Wee dresses as a woman to help the desperate con he is traveling evade the police and there is this beautiful shot of Pee-Wee (who makes a pretty good looking woman BTW) with the sun streaming across the windshield and the con gives the briefest wolfish, admiring glance over to Pee-Wee checking him out in his finery.

Kaitlyn
08-05-2001, 11:01 PM
Originally posted by silent_rob
Originally posted by Mofo Rising
It wasn't intentional, unless they were willing to take the joke really far. Tim Burton and Paul Reubens discuss this scene and the bike chain scene in the commentary on the DVD. Burton says it was unintentional, but that the scene had been hailed by several critics as "showing the falsity of moviemaking" or somesuch remark. On the DVD the scenes have been edited so you can no longer see the flubs. A mistake in my book.

The scene with the bikechain (similar situation with the other scene, I believe), when originally shown in theaters, did not show the bikechain coming from below the basket, so the DVD actually didn't edit out the flubs, but restored that scene to what Tim Burton intended, and what was seen in theaters.
The way it worked was that when widescreen movies became popular, some theater owners, in an attempt to cash in on it, used "masking". So if a movie wasn't widescreen, they'd mask the top and bottom to change the aspect ratio to make it seem widescreen. Filmmakers generally hated this because it altered their original vision. However, some filmmakers used this, so they could shoot on cheaper film (with a different ratio from widescreen), but still show it in widescreen. Pee-wee's Big Adventure was one such film.
However, in Europe and on television, they use a different aspect ratio. The critics Burton was talking about in the commentary were in Europe (France, I believe). Burton had no idea the masking wouldn't work in Europe until he actually saw it at a screening, there.
The same thing happened with the subsequent TV showings and video releases of Pee-wee's Big Adventure. Because they were shown in the format it was originally shot in (the same ratio as TV), they didn't bother pan-and-scanning the widescreen (because they didn't have to). So because it wasn't masked, you got to see the whole picture, and the bike-chain thing was revealed.
However, because many people have seen it this way for years, they think that's the way Burton originally had it in the theaters.

Silent rob has it very close. Up until 1954, all movies were filmed in 1.33 to 1, which is the same ratio as television. To differentiate themselves from TV, moviemakers developed a variety of widescreen techniques, which eventually boiled down to two versions used today. One uses an anamorphic lens to squeeze a widescreen (2.35 to 1) image onto 35mm film stock, and requires an equivilent lens to expand the image when projected. This was expensive, requiring special cameras and projectors, so an alternate method was developed.

Regular cameras were used and a 1.33 to 1 ratio was shot, but the top and bottom portions were never intended to be seen by the audience. The masking method was actually developed by moviemakers, who filmed their movies with this in mind, i.e., filming material at the bottom and top of the frame that is supposed to be masked out when projected. In the US, the usual aspect ratio for this type of widescreen is 1.85 to 1, in Europe the ratio is 1.66 to 1.

Problems can occur when a movie shot for 1.85 projection is shown in a European theater which masks the film to 1.66 to 1, thus showing more of the film at the top and bottom than was intended by the filmmaker. Usually, this tends to reveal things at the top of the frame such as boom mikes, lights, or cranes, which were expected to be masked out. When you see a boom mike at the top of the frame in a theater, it's because the projectionist hasn't framed the film properly.

When 1.85 or 1.66 movies are transferred to video or DVD, there are two methods of creating a "full-frame" transfer. The most common method is pan-n-scan, in which the video pans back and forth across the approved middle portion of the film, thus disregarding the extra information at the top and bottom. But sometimes a video transfer is made by transferring the entire frame, including parts at the top and bottom of the frame that were masked out in theaters. This is not pan-n-scan, as the video shows everything that was shown in the theater, with more at the top and bottom. Stanley Kubrick framed most of his later films so that a full frame transfer could made using the whole film frame. If you have seen, for example, "Full Metal Jacket" in 1.33 to 1, this is not a pan-n-scan, it is Kubrick's preferred video presentation. Some filmmakers intentionally frame their movies to make such video transfers.

In the case of "Pee Wee's Big Adventure", when shown in Europe, the 1.66 masking revealed slightly more at the top and bottom than intended, thus showing parts of the chain scene that were meant to be hidden. Improper framing in the US sometimes revealed this also. Burton did not supervise initial video transfers of the film, and again, improper framing revealed more than he intended for the audience to see.

A bit of trivia: Robocop was filmed for an aspect ratio of 1.66 to 1, but most American theaters at the time could only mask films for 1.85 to 1, so most people saw it at the wrong aspect ratio in the theaters. This then caused problems when the Criterion edition restored the correct 1.66 ratio for their DVD edition, leading people to complain about the picture being altered.

Another bit of trivia: Many golden age Disney movies were 2.35 to 1. Most modern Disney movies are 1.66 to 1, to make the transfer to video more convenient. Which is to say, Disney has changed to an inferior format for the theater because they make a lot more money from video.

GuanoLad
08-06-2001, 12:36 AM
Originally posted by Sam Stone
In "Star Wars", when the Stormtrooper that Luke knocks out or kills to take his armor is called "THX 1138", which was the name of Lucas's first sf movie. Those letters appear in all kinds of Lucas films.

Actually, that Trooper is TK-421. What you're thinking of is when Han and Luke present Chewie to the Prison Level Officer, and tell him it's a "prisoner transfer from Cell Block 1138"

And the cell that Leia is kept in is 2187, which hardly anyone knows is the title of an experimental student film (read 'pretentious claptrap') that George Lucas made when he was a teen.

Fionn
08-06-2001, 12:48 AM
Originally posted by Katisha

In Baz Luhrmann's Romeo and Juliet, I always liked all the little Shakespeare references on the billboards: Prospero Fine Vintage Whiskey, a strip joint (I think) called Mistress Quickly's, and (my favorite) Rosencrantz's wiener stand.

IIRC, there was also an Out, Out Damned Spot Cleaners and a Globe movie theater.

I agree with bean_shadow that Kubrick's films have a lot of neat touches. Late in Eyes Wide Shut, after Tom Cruise's character has witnessed some events at a mansion (I'll say no more in case anyone who wants to has yet to see the movie) and is being followed. He picks up a newspaper with the headline "Lucky to be alive." This sparked a debate between a friend and me about whether Cruise's character was ever actually in any danger.

Chocobo
08-06-2001, 02:02 AM
Originally posted by Sam Stone


In "Star Wars", when the Stormtrooper that Luke knocks out or kills to take his armor is called "THX 1138", which was the name of Lucas's first sf movie. Those letters appear in all kinds of Lucas films.



Actually, the trooper was TK-421. I think what you're referring to is the serial number on the plane in which Indy escapes in...Raiders? Or maybe it was the Temple of Doom. I'm not sure. But anyways, just a minor nitpick.

Chocobo
08-06-2001, 02:07 AM
Note to self: Read the second page before posting.

Anyways, a nice little addition was a scene in X-Men where just after kicking the butt of two of the X-Men, Toad (Ray Park) crosses his makeshift staff (a piece of wood he grabbed, or something like that) behind his back, just like a lightsaber, which he wielded as Darth Maul in EP1. That was a nice touch.

Badtz Maru
08-06-2001, 02:46 AM
In Blade Runner when Deckard and Rachael go back to his apartment after he gets knocked around a bit by a replicant, a tiny swirl of blood backwashes into his drink when he takes a sip. I always thought that was a neat detail.

warmgun
08-06-2001, 02:49 AM
Saw one tonight: 'Fight Club', he ordered a yin-yang table at the begining of the movie and you saw it in the rubble when his apt gets blown up.

Bad News Baboon
08-06-2001, 03:11 AM
in Traffic, Benicio del Torro actually uses a mexican accent. Not a big deal, but it amazes me in how many movies, the accent is all wrong.

They mostly use actors who obviously don't speak Spanish or speak Spanish with a different accent than that which is intended. This simply 'ruins' a movie for me.

grimpixie
08-06-2001, 07:41 AM
Originally posted by Johnny L.A.
The line that the monks are chanting tranlates to "This is the beginning of the chant, this is the end of the chant"
Is that true? I always thought they were saying, "He is Jesus the Lord. Give it a rest."

I'd Always thought it was "Pie Jesu Domine (smack) Donna Eis Requiem (smack)" i.e (loosly) "Give us your peace Lord Jesus"

Personally I think Johnny L.A.'s is the most appropriate...

Gp

BobSchroeck
08-06-2001, 12:49 PM
Originally posted by Johnny L.A.
The line that the monks are chanting tranlates to "This is the beginning of the chant, this is the end of the chant"
Is that true? I always thought they were saying, "He is Jesus the Lord. Give it a rest."

That seems far more likely. I don't really speak Latin, but I can puzzle a lot of it out, and I have a good memory for the sounds of the monks. They are chanting something much like:

Dei Iesu Domine
Dona ies requiem
<whack>

The first line is clearly "God Jesus Lord" or something built around that which I can't figure out because I never had the chance to learn noun declensions and verb conjugations in Latin. The second line has always puzzled me, but I think your translation is on the money. "Requiem" is clearly related to "requiesat", which is the "R" in "RIP"/"Rest in peace". "Dona" is a tense of the Latin verb "to give".

While on the topic of Holy Grail, the best funny detail therein (in my opinion) is really only noticeable by Arthurian scholars and folks who have read Malory's Morte d'Arthur closely -- and it is that Lancelot's mistaken "rescue" of the prince and slaughter at the wedding is not an exaggeration or a gag. It's how Lancelot acts in Malory -- right down to the embarassed apologies afterwards. Despite how he looks in later retellings and movies, Lancelot is seriously unstable.

-- Bob

gonzoron
08-06-2001, 01:34 PM
Similar to the King Kong scratch, I love a little bit in The Phantom Menace when Watto scratches his feet together subconsciously. His stubble is also a "neat" touch.

A lot of the transitions are fun in Highlander. I especially like the one where the camera dollies up through the roof of the parking garage and emerges from the ground in medieval Scotland.

Balance
08-06-2001, 01:35 PM
One of the nicest homages I've seen in a movie was in Batman, in the scene in which the cartoonist hands the reporter a sketch of a bat in a business suit. If you look at the signature, you'll notice that it's a pretty good imitation of Bob Kane's.

The Devil's Grandmother
08-06-2001, 02:37 PM
Watching the numerous scientific principles Rosencrantz and Guildenstern discover in Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are dead makes the movie far funnier as well as slightly more tragic.

A few years ago there was a fairly bad Patrick Swayze movie called Soldier. In a brief pan you saw the soldiers sitting (profile) on their bunks. Down their arms were tattoos naming the battles they’d been in. The names of the battles were taken from numerous books.

In the first Superman movie, Reeves needs to change his clothes and dashed past a modern phone “booth”. He pauses just long enough to look it up and down; moves on. I thought it was the funniest moment in the movie.

bup
08-06-2001, 02:44 PM
Originally posted by Balance
One of the nicest homages I've seen in a movie was in Batman, in the scene in which the cartoonist hands the reporter a sketch of a bat in a business suit. If you look at the signature, you'll notice that it's a pretty good imitation of Bob Kane's.

It *was* Bob Kane, and it was Bob Kane's hand.

zev_steinhardt
08-06-2001, 03:11 PM
I just recently re-watched "The Truman Show," so that is what I will comment on.

The boat that Truman goes out in at the end of the movie is the Santa Maria. Pretty appropriate name for a ship where Truman himself is making his voyage of discovery.

Of course, the character's name (True Man) sets him apart from everyone else (who is fake).

The bridesmades at his wedding all had similar names. (I think they were Jodi, Jean and Jeneane, but I could be mistaken about that). Similarly his wife and best friend had similar names (Merle and Marlon).

The "star" that falls from the sky at the beginning of the movie is Sirius (the dog star). I found that interesting in terms of how Truman doesn't like dogs in the movie.

Later, when I think a bit more about other movies, I'll post about them.

Zev Steinhardt

Balance
08-06-2001, 05:14 PM
Even better, bup. I trust that you didn't mean that Kane himself did a cameo as the cartoonist, right? Denis Lill is credited as "Bob the cartoonist".

I didn't realize that it was actually Kane's hand, though in retrospect I should have.

orr
08-06-2001, 06:38 PM
The first thing that came to mind after reading the topic title was Trading Places.

I always thought the scene where the two Duke brothers where explaining commodities training to Eddie Murphy was neat. They got more and more condescending as they explained it "And this is bacon, which you can get from pigs!". Finally Eddie Murphy breaks character and looks directly into the camera for a second as if to say, "Can you believe these two?".

Danimal
08-06-2001, 07:33 PM
Richard Burbage, a contemporary of William Shakespeare, was the first actor to triumph in the role of Richard. There is a story that during one performance of Richard III, Burbage made an assignation with a female theatergoer smitten by his performance; Shakespeare overheard and hurried to the lady's home, taking Burbage's place while the actor finished the play. When Burbage arrived and was asked who he was, he indignantly shouted "Richard the Third!" The servant returned a few minutes later with a message from Shakespeare: "William the Conqueror came before Richard the Third!"

There is a lovely little reference to this story in Shakespeare in Love. Joseph Fiennes is in a pub and sees a lady who says something like "I remember you - William the Conqueror!"

I also like the touch in A.I. where all the little mirror-dolls that hang over David's bed have the hearts cut out of them.

Katisha
08-06-2001, 07:43 PM
Originally posted by Danimal
There is a lovely little reference to this story in Shakespeare in Love. Joseph Fiennes is in a pub and sees a lady who says something like "I remember you - William the Conqueror!"


Yeah, I loved that. There's a site devoted to cataloguing all the references in that movie, but it missed that one. I tried to send it in, but the email address didn't work, more's the pity.

Another SiL bit I liked was the shot of Will writing his name over and over, using different spellings -- the spellings being the same ones as the few extant Shakespeare signatures.

Bob, re Lancelot -- my sister saw the movie with me a few days ago, and she said exactly the same thing. (We're both Arthur buffs. :D)

jab1
08-06-2001, 08:54 PM
Originally posted by Pushkin
Ray Harryhausen AFAIK did the special effects for a King Kong movie, the one where Kong fights a T-rexThis was the very first Kong movie, and it was Willis O'Brien who did the FX. Harryhausen was only a kid at the time. Ray became an apprentice to O'Brien for Mighty Joe Young.

rowrrbazzle
08-06-2001, 09:36 PM
Originally posted by BobSchroeck
Dei Iesu Domine
Dona ies requiemNobody's gotten this completely right, so here's the Straight Dope. The lines are "Pie Jesu Domine", "dona eis requiem". Literally translated, "O pious [saintly, holy] Jesus, Lord", "give to them rest". "Them" refers to the souls of the dead. The lines occur at the end of the "Dies Irae" from the old Latin Requiem or funeral mass and probably in other spots.

pesch
08-06-2001, 10:10 PM
At the end of Ghostbusters, after the Stay-Puf Marshmallow Man blows up, the Busters reappear. Everyone is covered in goo, except for Bill Murray. Not a spot on him. The others kinda look at him, in a middle shot, but nobody ever asks and he never explains. A very appropriate result for someone who was more scam artist than scientist.

I love movies where don't hit you over the head with the jokes. (Well, except for Airplane!, but that was so crammed with jokes.

Miller
08-06-2001, 11:28 PM
Zev: Remember, his full name was Truman Burbank. Burbank, of course, is the Southern California town where NBC has a significant TV studio. Jay Leno shoots his show there.

Also in the Truman Show, one of the shots in the Control Room shows Ed Harris giving a go-sign for the show's musician to start playing the score. The musician is played by composer Philip Glass, who has several of his pieces on the soundtrack.

ITR champion
08-07-2001, 12:53 AM
Originally posted by zev_steinhardt
The bridesmades at his wedding all had similar names. (I think they were Jodi, Jean and Jeneane, but I could be mistaken about that). Similarly his wife and best friend had similar names (Merle and Marlon).


In Pleasantville, all of the bowling teams had names that matched up like that. Also, IIRC, the mayor had scored a perfect 300.

Actually, there are a ton of nice touches in that movie. Clocks and calendars are among the first objects to change into color, which is appropriate because time had no meaning in Pleasentville when it was entirely black and white.

Green Eyed Stranger
08-07-2001, 01:26 AM
One scene I remember from "The Shawshank Redemption" is when they pan down into the library and Red is saying something about "By 1957 Shawshank had a first class library ..." or something like that. It's interesting the the library had a plaque "Brooks Haywood Memorial Library", and earlier in the movie you remember Tim Robins' character (I think, it might have been one of the others) carving "Broo " into a plaque. Brooks of course was the old prison librarian Tim was assigned to. "Easy, Peasy, Japaneasy"

Of course there are others, but I can't remember the movies. The thing I do remember is noting the reference, then being the ONLY one in the theater laughing out loud.

GES

mastorrent
08-07-2001, 03:09 AM
BTW, if you didn't like that movie, IMHO you should be forced to watch it over and over again until you do...

How about when there is the special television interview with the creator (who's name slips my mind) and the interviewer offers his gratitude to the creator for accepting the interview, since it is well known that the creator values his privacy...


Also, how can we forget a thing or 2 from 2001: A Space Odyssey...

The prehistoric apes fight over a pool of water. HAL and the main character fight over Frank Pool(e). The diplomats fight over a small pool of spilled water...

The significance of the dawn... the dawn at the beginning of the movie, the dawn when the apes use the bone, the dawn at the end of the movie...

I've been told the book offers a different perspective on the story, I'm gonna read it one of these days, as soon as I get off the internet...

zev_steinhardt
08-07-2001, 09:22 AM
Originally posted by mastorrent
How about when there is the special television interview with the creator (who's name slips my mind) and the interviewer offers his gratitude to the creator for accepting the interview, since it is well known that the creator values his privacy...


Ah, but that's a big part of it. The creator's name is ... Christof!

Zev Steinhardt

Zebra
08-07-2001, 09:53 AM
If you watch all the people watching 'The Truman Show' you can see products they have purchased from the show. The old ladies have Truman pillows, the guy in the bath tub even has Truman stuff.

Also a shot of the town just before he starts his escape a weather vane in the foreground changes direction. In other words the wind changes which could mean the winds of change or like in Mary Poppins the wind has changed and it's time to leave.

Marlon always holds beer with all the lables in the six pack pinting towards the camera. (It is also the beer in the bar.)

The girl they move into Truman's office after Meryl leaves looks a little like Truman's dream girl and she wears a red sweater and has simular jewlery.

Meryl = Carol Meryl who showcases the prizes on Let's Make a Deal?

The lighit is for Sirius (sp) but say it out loud as in serious and I'll think you might see a new meaning.

Of course all the newspapaer headlines point to something in the show.

Truman's favorite film is called 'Show me the Way to go Home' which it's description is a blatant rip-off of 'It's a Wonderful Life'. I guess they couldn't get permission to use the title.

I always liked it when Marlon comments on the beautiful (and he knows) fake sunset. "That's the master's paintbrush."

OF course when the dad is reintroduced with the amnesia in the interview later the interviewer calls this genius. I loved this slap at the bad writing of soap operas.

The town motto on the arch I believe reads "All for one" or something like that.


If you really liked The Truman Show I recomend Gattaca which was written and directed by the author of Truman.

Gattaca has a ton of great little touches but I'll leave that for later.

Tretiak
08-07-2001, 10:10 AM
Well, I didn't particularly care for The Truman Show but that debate is for another time and place.

For "neat" touches: I would submit from the X-Files: Fight the Future, Mulder is taking a piss in an alley outside a bar. Appropriately he is pissing on a poster for the movie Independence Day.

Kamino Neko
08-07-2001, 10:26 AM
Originally posted by Chocobo
Anyways, a nice little addition was a scene in X-Men where just after kicking the butt of two of the X-Men, Toad (Ray Park) crosses his makeshift staff (a piece of wood he grabbed, or something like that) behind his back, just like a lightsaber, which he wielded as Darth Maul in EP1. That was a nice touch.

My favourite from X-Men is on the Blackbird when they're heading to New York...

Wolverine looks at his uniform. 'You actually go out in public in these?'

Cyke looks over his shoulder with a tiny smile. 'What would you prefer? Yellow spandex?'

Wolverine's costume in the comics is yellow spandex with brown stripes (stripes which were replicated on his movie uniform, which was another nice - and far more subtle - touch).

(Have I ever mentioned just how glad I am that they didn't try to replicate the comic costumes for the movie?)

One neat touch that I always like when I actually notice it is when fake lens-flare is added to animated stuff. (I noticed it while I was watching the You're Under Arrest Criminally Complete Collection yesterday - every episode has at least one time with this happening.)

wolfseyn
08-07-2001, 12:07 PM
In Reservoir Dogs Mr. Orange (Tim Roth) is telling a story. We see a flashback of this Bathroom scene. The cool part is Mr. Orange is seen telling the story while inside the flashback. (got it? Perhaps someone could explain this better for me?...) I always thought this was neat.

FallenAngel
08-07-2001, 12:30 PM
In High Fidelity when Cusack's "Rob" is flashing back to his relationship with Catherine Zeta-Jones' "Charlie". He's talking about how he always felt like a phoney, like he was just acting good enough to be with her. As he's finishing the voice over, she's standing across the bedroom from him, her back to him, and she pulls on a black T-shirt.

When she turns around, you see it's a Pretenders shirt.

The timing and the smoothness of this scene just jumped at me the first time I saw the movie, and it still hits me after four or five viewings now.

FallenAngel
08-07-2001, 12:39 PM
Another Cusack movie Grosse Point Blank has a subtle character defining moment I really like. As Cusack's character (a professional killer in the throes of ennui) is getting ready to go to his high school reunion, he's really nervous and calls his shrink.

The doctor, played by Allen Arkin, tells him to repeat to himself, "This is me breathing."

Cusack walks over the dresser, pulls out a pistol, ratchets the slide and says, "This is me breathing."

Brilliant.

Freudian Slit
08-07-2001, 12:48 PM
Oh yeah. in Reservoir Dogs, Mr. Orange is talking to the cop who's half dead already. And he's talking about how he was telling a joke to get himself "initiated" with the gang of jewel thieves. And he tells the bathroom story which never even really happened. I like how the story goes along, with him rehearsing, ending with him actually telling it with confidence.

Other touches
Back to the Future is chock full of them.

-When he's playing "Johnny B. Goode" and the black dude calls up "his cousin Chuck" because he plays it so well.

-When the family (Marty's mom, grandparents, etc.) are eating dinner and watching the TV, and Marty says he's seen this episode of "The Honeymooners" already. Hehe. "What's a rerun?" Also, when he says he has two TV's and everyone thinks he's joking. Oh yeah and little Joey in the playpen, Marty's uncle who as an adult is perpetually in jail.

-Also I loved the whole bit with "Who's the president in 1985, future boy?" "That's easy, Ronald Reagan." :)

Agrippina
08-07-2001, 01:30 PM
Originally posted by mastorrent
Also, how can we forget a thing or 2 from 2001: A Space Odyssey...

The prehistoric apes fight over a pool of water. HAL and the main character fight over Frank Pool(e). The diplomats fight over a small pool of spilled water...

The significance of the dawn... the dawn at the beginning of the movie, the dawn when the apes use the bone, the dawn at the end of the movie...

I also like how the movie is one big circle. The opening title show the earth from the Star Child's point of view, and the ending shows the Star Child watching Earth.

silent_rob
08-07-2001, 04:24 PM
Thanks for putting it clearer, Number Six.

I thought of another one. In Close Encounters of the Third Kind, where the R2-D2 is attatched to the bottom of the mother ship. There's a documentary on the new DVD of it that points it out very clearly (and all of the special effects in the film are explained very well; it's a pretty cool documentary).

Cervaise
08-07-2001, 07:48 PM
I've got a few, but first a couple of nitpicks:

GuanoLad already picked up Sam Stone's THX-1138/TK-421 thing, but it's also worth mentioning that one of the cars in Lucas's American Grafitti has a THX-1138 license plate.

And Devil's Grandmother: Soldier starred Kurt Russell, not Patrick Swayze.

Okay, here's a few:

In Excalibur, there's a scene where Arthur is talking to a guy (don't remember who, it's been a while) about something or other. As they talk, you sort of subconsciously realize that there's a figure walking up in the background. Arthur mentions Merlin in the conversation, at which point the figure arrives -- and it's Merlin. When you see the movie a second time, you recognize that Merlin is anticipating being referred to, and is coming up just in time for the reference. Pretty cool.

Say what you like about Unbreakable, pro or con, but there's a very cool bit of filmmaking late in the movie. (Skip to the next paragraph if you haven't seen the movie and plan to. Last warning...) When Bruce Willis goes to the house to rescue the family, there's a long shot where he goes into the upstairs bedroom and finds the woman tied up on the floor. The camera is outside the house, looking in through the window. Watch how the billowing curtains reveal first Bruce at the door, then the woman, then Bruce reacting, and so forth. It looks totally natural, but if you pay attention, it's clear this is an artificial and deliberate effect. Very subtle, and very cool filmmaking.

Similar to the above is a moment in O Brother Where Art Thou. A newspaper gets tossed on a fire, and just the first page burns off, revealing an important story on the second page. A difficult effect, but par for the course for the Coens.

There are a couple of fun moments in Gremlins where director Joe Dante refers to Steven Spielberg, the movie's producer. The billboard logo for Rockin' Ricky Rialto is in the graphic style of the Raiders of the Lost Ark title. In the background of the beginning tour of the town, you see a movie marquee advertising Watch the Skies, which was an early/working title for Close Encounters of the Third Kind. And when Stripe, the main villain gremlin, is skulking around the department store at the end, at one point he pops out from a row of stuffed animals, in particular an E.T. doll.

Shakespeare in Love has been mentioned as having a few funny little touches like this. My favorite, I think, is when the boy who enjoys torturing small animals says his name: John Webster. When I saw the movie, four people sprinkled throughout the packed theater burst out laughing, and then shut up quickly when they realized everybody else had turned to stare at them. (I was one of the four.) Webster, for anyone who doesn't know classical dramas, would go on to write several plays in the Jacobean style, full of gratuitous death and suffering.

In the very funny South Korean slapstick comedy The Foul King, there's a truly sublime moment about fifteen minutes into it. The hero, a spineless wimp, comes across a gang of youths roughing up a victim in an alley. The hero shouts at them to stop. The lead tough pauses, his leg raised in mid-kick over the victim on the ground. This scene holds for a long, tense moment, until we suddenly realize, after a few silent seconds, that everybody in the alley is physically mirroring the large soccer mural painted on the wall behind them. Hilarious.

Tim Burton loves referring to stuff in his movies (c.f. Max Shreck in Batman Returns), but some of his funniest are in his short film Frankenweenie. In particular, part of the story takes place on a miniature golf course, which allows Burton to show a windmill, referring to the same image in James Whale's original film of Frankenstein.

And one excellent example of very subtle filmmaking: In Titanic (no, wait, go with me here), as the ship is really starting to sink in earnest, there's a shot from behind the ship as the stern is raised at about forty-five degrees and a guy falls from the rail. The camera tilts down to follow the speck of his body against the huge ship, showing him dropping what look like hundreds of feet until he splashes hard against the water below. The subtle element is this: When his body impacts, the camera keeps moving down a hair before stopping the tilt and adjusting back up to focus on the splash. Why is this cool? Because this shot is almost entirely a digital effect. Whoever put the shot together recognized that in the real world, a cameraman following the body down would "overshoot" downward a bit. In the digital realm, the camera can do anything; the effects artist could have stopped the camera on a dime when the guy splashed down. That wouldn't have looked realistic, and by simulating a real-world camera "error," the special effects are made to seem more realistic.

Oh, and another cool touch like this, since I recently watched Toy Story with commentary: When Woody accidentally knocks Buzz out the window, the bit with the rolling ball across the desk is designed to reference the huge stone boulder at the beginning of Raiders of the Lost Ark. The camera move sliding up to Buzz, looking up at him from beneath, is exactly the same camera move used by Spielberg looking up at Indiana Jones at the same moment. What's more, the sounds of the thumbtacks falling and sticking in the desktop are exactly the same sound effects as the darts that shoot from the walls when Indy steps on the floor triggers.

I'll probably be back when I think of more. I love this stuff.

Robot Arm
08-07-2001, 09:44 PM
Originally posted by silent_rob
I thought of another one. In Close Encounters of the Third Kind, where the R2-D2 is attatched to the bottom of the mother ship. There's a documentary on the new DVD of it that points it out very clearly (and all of the special effects in the film are explained very well; it's a pretty cool documentary).

Here's a coincidence for you, I just saw the model of that ship a few days ago. It's at the National Air and Space Museum's storage facility in Maryland. In addition to R2, there are some very small airplanes (representing either the abducted pilots or a squandron lost in the Bermuda Triangle), a mailbox (the guy giving the tour didn't know where, and none of us could find it either) and a Volkswagen Bus.

And the license plate in American Graffiti is THX 138 on John Milner's (Paul Le Mat) yellow coupe.

LaToyota Corolla Falana
08-07-2001, 10:26 PM
In the movie E.T., obviously, Elliot's name starts with E and ends with T. Neat!

Drew Barrymore's character played with ET a few times, but the only words ET said to her were "Be Good." The first time was when ET learned how to talk while watching Sesame Street "B, basket bandit ball.." or something, to which Drew exclaims that it's good that ET talks. ET aggrees by saying "B Good." At the end of the movie, when Drew says her tearful goodbye, ET says "Be good." NEAT!

When Elliot goes out to check the shed, over a period of several hours, the moon in the sky does not move. And despite the famous shot of ET and the cyclists flying in front of the full moon, the moon in the shed scenes is clearly in the wrong phase. I would have expected better. (Who am I to complain?)

In Star Wars, 3CPO is the communications/translator droid. According to my father, the Chief Petty Officer (CPO) is in charge of ship communications. Neat!

I agree with the earlier poster about GATTACA, which is absolutely full of neat things, veiled references, hidden meanings, etc. The name GATTACA (GATACA?) is taken from the chemical code of DNA, which is made of chemicals referred to as G, A, T, & C. The stairway in the house is a DNA-like helix, which Jude Law's character has literally struggle up. Casting Borgnine as the lower class (inferior DNA) worker is priceless. Uma Thurman looks about as perfect as a woman can look in this movie. NEAT Movie!

Chum
08-08-2001, 12:25 AM
Originally posted by astro
The Pee-Wee's Big Adventure scene where Pee-Wee dresses as a woman to help the desperate con he is traveling evade the police and there is this beautiful shot of Pee-Wee (who makes a pretty good looking woman BTW) with the sun streaming across the windshield and the con gives the briefest wolfish, admiring glance over to Pee-Wee checking him out in his finery.

I know! This movie was one of my childhood faves, and a recent rewatching revealed all sorts of inappropriate things I had never noticed before! What a great movie.

Another nice touch is in Shanghai Noon when the camera pans out and we realize that they're in the same bathtub! I couldn't believe what I was watching!

Ross
08-08-2001, 01:49 AM
[i]... at the end of the movie, when Drew says her tearful goodbye, ET says "Be good."[/B](to self: 'Didn't really sink in, did it?')

Anyway, by far the best line in The X-Men was the point where Cyclops demands that Wolverine prove he's Wolverine. Without missing a beat he replies, "You're a dick," which Cyclops can only accept.

Reminds me of a scene in Blackadder Goes Forth, where they've been captured by a right stuck-up pompous Red Baron type, played by Adrian Edmondson. A rescue party arrives led by Lord Flashheart (Rik Mayall) - HURRAH! - and they're leaving when the Red Baron strides in. He begins the standard "Gentleman warriors" speech, pacing up and down in front of Flashheart: "So, at last we two noble brothers of the air meet... two gentlemen, finally face to face on ze field of combat..." etc, etc, etc, etc, etc. Except that he's only halfway through when Flashheart draws his revolver and shoots him, yells "What a poof!", and they all leg it.

Which in itself isn't unlike a certain scene in Raiders of the Lost Ark... is there any truth in the story that Indy was meant to fight the big bloke with the sword, and that the revolver thing was inspired by an improvisation?

Cervaise
08-08-2001, 02:11 AM
Ross: Harrison Ford had the dysentary something fierce and was running a high fever. As they started talking about the fight sequence, he suggested in his somewhat delirious pique, what if I just shoot him? Everybody loved it, and a classic moment was born.

I bet you can find more details under the Trivia section of the IMDB's Raiders entry. It's ten after midnight and I need to go to bed, or I'd look up the link for you.

AwSnappity
08-08-2001, 02:58 AM
I've always liked the conversation about how Indy got his nickname at the end of Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade.

[i](with much thanks from the IMDb (http://us.imdb.com/Quotes?0097576)
Sallah: Please, what does it always mean, this... this "Junior"?
Professor Henry Jones: That's his name. [points to himself] Henry Jones... [points to Indy] ...Junior.
Indiana Jones: I like "Indiana."
Professor Henry Jones: We named the *dog* Indiana.
Marcus Brody: May we go home now, please?
Sallah: The dog?! You are named after the dog?!
Indiana Jones: I've got a lot of fond memories of that dog.

For all who don't know, Indiana was the name of George Lucas' dog.

silent_rob
08-08-2001, 03:22 AM
This is the IMDB Raiders Trivia (http://us.imdb.com/Trivia?0082971) page that Cervaise was talking about.

Why A Duck
08-08-2001, 07:15 AM
Originally posted by The Devil's Grandmother
Watching the numerous scientific principles Rosencrantz and Guildenstern discover in Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are dead makes the movie far funnier as well as slightly more tragic

I love that movie. The verbal tennis match they play is another shining moment.

Zebra
08-08-2001, 08:27 AM
After Hours

This movie is about mens sexual fears and it all takes place in one night in Downtown Manhattan. Griffen Dune meets a series of women, each crazier than the previous. Very scary and funny.

One great bit is he is in a bar and he goes to the bathroom. We see him scaning the wall looking at the graffiti and he comes across the picture of a man with an errection and a shark clamped down on the errection. The great thing is that the sound effect of him peeing stops dead when he sees this.

Great movie

enipla
08-08-2001, 09:04 AM
Tremmers

When the 'graboid' breaks into the survivalists basement and they shoot it about 200 times. When the thing finally dies, the survivalist says - 'Looks like ya broke into the wrong basement, didn't cha.

Also, at one point Kevin Bacon (?) is pounding in a fence staple with some fencing pliers. He just wails away at it and keeps missing it. Must of swung about 25 times.

Loved it.

CalMeacham
08-08-2001, 09:12 AM
There are a lot of cute touches in the original Terminator that a lot of people might have missed. The movie is really a pretty dark comedy.

-- The nightclub that Sarah Connor takes refuge in is called "Tech Noir" -- "Black (or Dark) Technology".

-- Sarah's answering machine message starts out "I'll bet you didsn't know you were talking to a machine --- but machines need love, too." Pretty ironic when you consider the context, especially when a machine (Arnold the Terminator) is listening to it.

-- The Terminator is clearly capable of learning, and we get to see this. The first words spoken to him (after he says to the punks at the observatory "Your clothes. Give them to me.") are "Fuck you, asshole!" Later, when he's staying at a fleabag motel and starting to deteriorate (we know this because flies are gathering around him) the manager asks "Hey, you got a dead cat in there or something?" through the door. From the Terminator's Point of View we see him scrolling through a list of possible responses. The last one -- obviously the most recently added (and the one he chooses) -- is "Fuck you, asshole!" In the T2 movie Arnold learns new responses from John Connor, but it's really obvious and nowhere near as subtle as this.







In the John Carpenter version of The Thing there's a barely-visible (and usually out-of-focus) poster about VD. It shows a drawing of a girl wearing a ribbon that says "I have VD", and the caption reads "They're not all labeled." Considering that the plot is about identifying shape-shifting aliens among the crew, this is pretty relevant.

RickJay
08-08-2001, 09:38 AM
During the scene in Jurassic Park when the T-Rex is chasing the jeep, a wounded Ian Malcolm exclaims, "Faster! Must go faster!"

During the scene in Independence Day when Jeff Goldblum and Will Smith are trying to escape from the mother ship, with the door to the outside closing, Goldblum repeats the line. Probably his idea, but it was neat.

gonzoron
08-08-2001, 09:38 AM
I believe E.T. was actually Elliot's initials, too. I can't find a cite (IMDB doesn't have the last name) but I think it was Taylor.

(By the way, it's C3PO, not 3CPO, but still neat)

First heard about this one on the DVD commentary:
In Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon, when Jen is practicing caligraphy, while others are watching, she writes in tiny, controlled characters. But when she's alone wtih Shu Lien, she writes in broad, flowing characters, symbolizing the repression in her normal life that she's is freed from by Gianghu.(sp?)

xizor
08-08-2001, 10:00 AM
I always liked in Fierce Creatures when John Cleese is talking to Jamie Lee Curtis and says "Yes Wanda, I mean Willa."

Katisha
08-08-2001, 11:42 AM
Originally posted by Cervaise
Shakespeare in Love has been mentioned as having a few funny little touches like this. My favorite, I think, is when the boy who enjoys torturing small animals says his name: John Webster. When I saw the movie, four people sprinkled throughout the packed theater burst out laughing, and then shut up quickly when they realized everybody else had turned to stare at them. (I was one of the four.) Webster, for anyone who doesn't know classical dramas, would go on to write several plays in the Jacobean style, full of gratuitous death and suffering.


Oh, good one! I had a similar experience, except I was watching it at home on video. My sisters thought I'd finally gone mad. ;)

Modian
08-08-2001, 12:39 PM
Anyways, a nice little addition was a scene in X-Men where just after kicking the butt of two of the X-Men, Toad (Ray Park) crosses his makeshift staff (a piece of wood he grabbed, or something like that) behind his back, just like a lightsaber, which he wielded as Darth Maul in EP1. That was a nice touch.

Would just like to point out this is his trademark, and he also does it in Sleepy Hollow as the headless horseman.

-Mod

Olentzero
08-08-2001, 01:01 PM
Originally posted by Modian
Would just like to point out this is [Ray Park's] trademark, and he also does it in Sleepy Hollow as the headless horseman.

What version were you watching? Last time I checked, the Headless Horseman was played by Christopher Walken. And convincingly so.

Olentzero
08-08-2001, 01:03 PM
Speaking of Sleepy Hollow, I really dug the scene where the Headless Horseman decapitates the fleeing night watchman at full gallop; the unfortunate man's body takes a couple steps more before stumbling to the ground - like it took that long to realize he didn't have a head any more because of the fear he was experiencing. Pretty cool, IMO.

gonzoron
08-08-2001, 01:23 PM
Modian's right, Olentzero. When the head's on, it's Walken. When he's headless, (e.g. most of the fight scence) it's Ray Park.

Another neat touch in there is Burton's tradmark black and white stripes on Cristina Ricci's dress at the end. Supposedly he's put someone in black and white stripes in all or most of his movies (Beetlejuice, the Penguin, Jack Skellington, someone in Mars attacks, I forget who...)

mongrel_8
08-08-2001, 01:24 PM
I liked in Traffic where Benicio Del Toro and his partner are talking about bringing in Frankie Flowers in Spanish. The whole conversation is in Spanish until Benicio's partner exclaims, "Frankie Flowers" midsentence. It was humorous and underlined that Frankie would play a major portion in the movie.

Then latter Benicio and his partner capture Frankie by picking him up in a gay bar. General Salazar asks how they were able to capture Frankie so easily. :)

Olentzero
08-08-2001, 01:35 PM
Originally posted by gonzoron
Modian's right, Olentzero.

Whaddaya know. IMDB knows everything! I cede the point.

When the head's on, it's Walken.

Much like the unfortunate night watchman. ;)

Spoke
08-08-2001, 03:45 PM
Though I hated the movie as a whole, I thought that the vampire's independently moving shadow in Francis Ford Coppola's Dracula was a nice touch.

jcg20
08-08-2001, 05:02 PM
Cant believe no one mentioned this yet...

In The Fifth Element, there is a scene where Milla Jojovich is telling a story about how she made sure that the stones (objects of desire) didn't fall into the hands of Zorg (bad guy). As she is telling the story, we cut to another room where Zorg is making realizations in-line with where Milla is with her story. So, you don't hear the entire story, because you see the results of the parts you miss. Brilliant. At the end of the story, she lets out this cackle...great stuff.

Ross
08-08-2001, 05:38 PM
Another one. Almost cheesy, but Sean Connery can carry off the cheesiest lines in the world because HE'S JAMES BOND AND HE DOESN'T CARE, OKAY?

I think it's in The Hunt for Red October. Obviously they wanted the realism of having the Russians speak Russian, at least at first, but decided it would slow the whole movie down a good deal if one side used subtitles all the time. Whatever the motive, the way they got around it was nice: the camera moves in on Connery as the Russian captain, talking with one of his officers, in Russian. It moves right up to his mouth until he says the word "Armageddon", and then slowly pulls back: from that moment on, everything's in English.

The details may be sketchy, at best. I may not even have the right film, foreign language, or star. But it happened somewhere, some time, and although slightly obvious it was pretty classy for a blockbuster.

John Bredin
08-08-2001, 06:07 PM
Actually, it's not Captain Ramius (Connery's character) who's speaking when they do the Russian-to-English change -- which I agree was cool -- but the political officer, Putin.

Enderw24
08-08-2001, 06:14 PM
Originally posted by wolfseyn
In Reservoir Dogs Mr. Orange (Tim Roth) is telling a story. We see a flashback of this Bathroom scene. The cool part is Mr. Orange is seen telling the story while inside the flashback. (got it? Perhaps someone could explain this better for me?...) I always thought this was neat.

Wanna know something even more neaterest?
OK, the cops that are in the bathroom of Orange's fantasy story are the same ones that bust in at the end of the movie while Orange is lying bleeding on the ramp. They're never shown, but the voices are the same. One of the cops even gives the same line, telling Keitel to "drop the gun!" that that cop said while telling his story in the bathroom.

Kaitlyn
08-09-2001, 12:22 AM
Originally posted by Enderw24
Originally posted by wolfseyn
In Reservoir Dogs Mr. Orange (Tim Roth) is telling a story. We see a flashback of this Bathroom scene. The cool part is Mr. Orange is seen telling the story while inside the flashback. (got it? Perhaps someone could explain this better for me?...) I always thought this was neat.

Wanna know something even more neaterest?
OK, the cops that are in the bathroom of Orange's fantasy story are the same ones that bust in at the end of the movie while Orange is lying bleeding on the ramp. They're never shown, but the voices are the same. One of the cops even gives the same line, telling Keitel to "drop the gun!" that that cop said while telling his story in the bathroom.

Even neater, speaking inside the flashback is entirely appropriate, because it isn't really a flashback; it didn't really happen. What we're being shown is how Orange visualizes the story, so the cops he would put into his visualization would be the cops he's most familiar with--those who provide backup for his undercover police work.

Also, the voice over narration being taken up within the scene had been done a year before in Goodfellas; it was just one of a bunch of touches Tarantino borrowed from other movies for Reservoir Dogs (note: I am not criticizing him for borrowing from other movies; everyone does it, and seldom as well as Tarantino does in Dogs).

bryanmaguire
08-09-2001, 05:05 AM
Originally posted by Ross
[QUOTE]
Reminds me of a scene in Blackadder Goes Forth, where they've been captured by a right stuck-up pompous Red Baron type, played by Adrian Edmondson. A rescue party arrives led by Lord Flashheart (Rik Mayall) - HURRAH! -


Its Huzzah not Hurrah.

CalMeacham
08-09-2001, 05:59 AM
Though I hated the movie as a whole, I thought that the vampire's independently moving shadow in Francis Ford Coppola's Dracula was a nice touch.


It's a nice touch, but it was stolen (or "paid homage to") the 1932 Carl Dreyer flick Vampyr, a historically important, but (in my humble opinion) a terminally boring and confusing film. (The folks at Mad magazine claimed in their parody that it was lifted from Sergio Aragones' wonderful series "The Shadow Knows", but Dreyer's got 'em both beat by decades.)

Tomcat
08-09-2001, 06:12 AM
Originally posted by ToobaTeacher
I also love it when big stars do a walk on, like many did for Robert Altman's brilliant spoof of Hollywood "The Player".

The best touch of this movie is in the very beginning where two characters are talking about (break-away? cut-aways? not-stop? I forget the term) shooting movie scenes with no editing. Meaning that the camera keeps filming continuously even though it looks like it has gone through a wall or otherwise would need to be editted. The two are talking about one movie that has a scene like that that lasts for 10 whole seconds...while what is actually happening is that THIS scene in The Player goes on for over 30 seconds- the camera never stops filming and it looks like it is going through windows, walls, down the street, etc. They must have spent ages getting that right.

I liked the scene in 'The Breakfast Club' when the stoner says that he'll kill the jock, sticks the knife into the chair, and then the freaker girl slowly reaches over and steals the knife while he keeps talking...

-Tcat

Tomcat
08-09-2001, 06:26 AM
Oh yeah, I liked the tribute made in E.T. when they are walking down the street during Halloween and they pass Yoda and E.T. starts walking towards him going "Mama, Mama!"

-Tcat

Kaitlyn
08-09-2001, 06:45 AM
Originally posted by Tomcat


The best touch of this movie is in the very beginning where two characters are talking about (break-away? cut-aways? not-stop? I forget the term) shooting movie scenes with no editing. Meaning that the camera keeps filming continuously even though it looks like it has gone through a wall or otherwise would need to be editted. The two are talking about one movie that has a scene like that that lasts for 10 whole seconds...while what is actually happening is that THIS scene in The Player goes on for over 30 seconds- the camera never stops filming and it looks like it is going through windows, walls, down the street, etc. They must have spent ages getting that right.

-Tcat

It's called a tracking shot, and it actually lasts over 6 minutes. They discuss several famous tracking shots in movies, most notably in "Rope" and "The Third Man". For other recent examples, try "The Sheltering Sky", "Snake Eyes" and "Boogie Nights". "Unbreakable" is made almost entirely of shots longer than a minute.

Tomcat
08-09-2001, 06:49 AM
In Resevoir Dogs...Who killed Mr. Brown (Tarantino himself)? He's driving the getaway car, they crash, and you see him rubbing his bleeding head screaming he's blind ("You're not blind, that's blood.")- very much alive. After Keitel shoots the oncoming cops he asks about Brown- and Orange (Tim Roth) says "He's dead..." Some say that Brown got shot in the head by cops while escaping, but it was strange that he was alive and acting dazed, and then is just dead after 5 seconds of shooting (when Orange could have shot Brown without White knowing).

-Tcat

BobSchroeck
08-09-2001, 07:10 AM
Originally posted by LaToyota Corolla Falana
Drew Barrymore's character played with ET a few times, but the only words ET said to her were "Be Good."
In Charlie's Angels, the suburban house that Drew Barrymore runs into naked after falling from the bad guy's fancy cliffside home is the same house used for E.T.

-- Bob

Darqangelle
08-09-2001, 07:15 AM
Originally posted by enipla
Tremmers
When the 'graboid' breaks into the survivalists basement and they shoot it about 200 times. When the thing finally dies, the survivalist says - 'Looks like ya broke into the wrong basement, didn't cha.

That's 'Tremors', and the scene (just to add some detail) is the man-eating-alien-worm-monster-whozit busts through the basement wall of these survivalists, the camera slowly pans as they fire off whatever rounds they have in their weapons in hand while slowly backing away from the menace.

The back wall slowly appears in view and we see it is an NRA wetdream. A WALL of various rifles, machine guns, shotguns, riot guns and other small cannons. As our intrepid duo run out of ammo, they simply turn to grab the next weapon and continue firing a John Woo movie's worth of bullets into the big baddy until it slumps in death.

Exausted, he blurts out "Hah! Broke into the wrong REC ROOM, didn't ya!"

Pnuk Guy
08-09-2001, 07:47 AM
Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas has loads of neat touches.

At the beginning when Johnny Depp is doing the voice over he starts mumbling along in the film as well. Then he stops and thinks 'Did I just say that out loud?'

He also starts to hallucinate bats and stops the car to get a fly swat to get rid of them. As he drives away there is a dead bat by the roadside.

Plus it contains a million and one too subtle to even notice, let alone explain, touches.

Johnny L.A.
08-09-2001, 08:23 AM
In Star Wars, 3CPO is the communications/translator droid. According to my father, the Chief Petty Officer (CPO) is in charge of ship communications.
The 'droid's name was C3PO. Don't know about shipboard communications, but my father was the communications officer aboard the 7th Fleet's flagship CLG-5 USS Oklahoma City in the 1960s (the flagship alternated between CLG-5 and CLG-6 USS Providence) and he was a lieutenant.

Skijumper
08-09-2001, 08:25 AM
Contact - The opening sequence. With stars flying in complete, beautiful silence.

Twister - Towards the end where Helen Hunt and Bill Paxton are running from the twister. They make their way to a barn, the only shelter they can find, only to open the door and find knives and sickles swinging from the walls. Hunt yells "Who the hell are these people?" (or something to that effect).

Also, in the drive-in scene, the movie that's playing in the background as the twister descends is 'The Shining', with scenes of Jack Nicholson axing down the door and Shelley Duvall screaming.

Castaway - When Tom Hanks' plane crashes in the middle of the storm and he's seen riding the waves. The screen blacks out, only to be lit by flashes of lightning. All we see are these huge-ass waves. I thought that was the best part of the whole movie.

Agrippina
08-09-2001, 08:38 AM
Originally posted by Skijumper
Contact - The opening sequence. With stars flying in complete, beautiful silence.

Twister - Towards the end where Helen Hunt and Bill Paxton are running from the twister. They make their way to a barn, the only shelter they can find, only to open the door and find knives and sickles swinging from the walls. Hunt yells "Who the hell are these people?" (or something to that effect).

Also, in the drive-in scene, the movie that's playing in the background as the twister descends is 'The Shining', with scenes of Jack Nicholson axing down the door and Shelley Duvall screaming.

That's not all. One of the characters in the movie is named "Kubrick".

Darqangelle
08-09-2001, 08:51 AM
Star Trek: First Contact

"Borg? Sounds Swedish."

Superdude
08-09-2001, 09:13 AM
Someone mentioned Pulp Fiction, and there was another little touch that I thought was fantastic. The scene with Butch (Bruce Willis) and Fabienne (Maria de Medeiros) in the hotel. This takes place after the flashback with Christopher Walken, where Walken goes into the long story about Butch's watch. When Fabienne forgets the watch, and Butch goes on his rampage. He asks her if she had any idea what his dad had to go through to give him that watch. Then he says, "I don't have time to go into it, but he went through a lot."

lawoot
08-09-2001, 10:08 AM
Originally posted by Pnuk Guy
Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas has loads of neat touches.

At the beginning when Johnny Depp is doing the voice over he starts mumbling along in the film as well. Then he stops and thinks 'Did I just say that out loud?'

He also starts to hallucinate bats and stops the car to get a fly swat to get rid of them. As he drives away there is a dead bat by the roadside.

Plus it contains a million and one too subtle to even notice, let alone explain, touches.

Not to mention the scene where he's in a flashback and says something like 'hey is that me?', and the camera pans to the actual Hunter S. Thompson sitting at a table

Zebra
08-09-2001, 10:32 AM
Originally posted by Tomcat
Oh yeah, I liked the tribute made in E.T. when they are walking down the street during Halloween and they pass Yoda and E.T. starts walking towards him going "Mama, Mama!"

-Tcat

Actually he says 'Home! Home!' but it is a great scene.

Also the end of ET with the 'Be Good' or B, Good!' lines.

ET says a line back to each kid that is specific to them.

Drew gets B Good.


The older brother gets 'Ouch' from when ET mistakes the fake knife for real and tries to heal it. At the end ET feels the 'ouch' in his glowing heart.

Of course Eliot gets "I'll be ritght here" which Eliot says to hime a couple of times in the movie.


Another great touch is that when mom isn't around the older boys are listening to Jim Carrol's song People that Died but when she is there they are listening to some inane stuff.

Superdude
08-09-2001, 11:09 AM
Originally posted by FireUnderpantsBoobs
For all who don't know, Indiana was the name of George Lucas' dog.

Also, the dog was part of the inspiration for a Star Wars character. Lucas observed his wife driving off one day with Indiana, a big hairy dog, in the passenger seat. Lucas took Chewbacca from the visual that he had.

zev_steinhardt
08-09-2001, 09:40 PM
...had they been a little more careful...


In the scene in which the ark is opened, the villian (sorry, I don't remember his name) who is wearing the imitation High Priest clothing is saying a prayer. Anyone familiar with Jewish prayers will recognize the prayer as brich sh'mei, a prayer said when the Ark in synagouge is opened. Unfortuantely, the Ark from the Tabernacle and the Ark in a synagouge (where the Torahs are kept) have nothing to do with each other.

The producers/writers probably asked someone to find out what prayer the Jews say when the Ark is opened and didn't bother to investigate further.

(FTR, there wouldn't be any prayers that were said when the Tabernacle ark was opened, since it wasn't opened on any regular basis.)

Zev Steinhardt

MEBuckner
08-09-2001, 09:58 PM
Now, Zev, that may not have been a mistake. Perhaps if the guy had said the right prayer, God wouldn't have melted his face off.

Enderw24
08-10-2001, 02:32 AM
Oh, more stuff.

This is one you'd only catch the second time through. In The Shawshank Redemption, the warden hands Andy back the bible saying "remember, salvation lies within," which is a nice touch considering what's inside the Bible.

In Back to the Future II, the holographic Jaws in the year 2015 comes down and attacks Marty. The marquee in the back says "Jaws 15, directed by Max Spielberg," who's Steven's son.

Cameos by Danny Glover, Matt Damon, and Don Ameche and Ralph Bellamy in Maverick, Finding Forester and Coming to America respetively, were all funny bits. Oh yeah, and Charleton Heston in the new Planet of the Apes.

cykrider
08-11-2001, 12:45 AM
I was watching the commentary of the Anti-trust DVD and they show the scene of all the programmers that are being spied on, one of them is wearing a red hat, just like the Linux one! So cool!

Johanna
08-11-2001, 08:47 AM
In Mira Nair's film Kama Sutra: A Tale of Love, the queen (Sarita Choudhury) goes mad with sexual frustration (because her husband is ignoring her and schtupping the new courtesan). All she can do is lie down, twitching and moaning. They call in the doctor (Harish Patel) to examine her. She lies nude under a sheet with a hole in it; the doctor sticks his hand in this hole and uses it to examine her. When her touches her breasts, she moans loud. Then you see his hand moving south, toward her vulva....

When he pulls his hand out of the sheet, he rubs and flicks his fingertips as though he'd gotten something on them. The expression on his face is perfect. This is a very subtle touch, easy to miss, but it is exactly right to suggest the queen's state of excitation.

Lady_of_eeees
08-11-2001, 11:11 AM
In most (if not all) of Brian DePalma's movies, there will be a reference (either a character or in one case, graffiti on a wall) to "Bobby Dee". "Bobby Dee" is Brian's cousin (and a friend of mine, so I know it's true :)

eunoia
08-11-2001, 11:17 AM
Originally posted by eunoia
I'm not even sure if this was on purpose or not, but in Pee Wee's Big Adventure when Pee Wee gives a lift to the fugitive and their car careens out of control, there is a shot of the car going past some construction barriers. In this shot, you clearly see that the barriers are on wheels and being pulled towards the viewer to give the illusion that the car is moving away. What I thought was neat is that I never noticed it the first time, even though it's so obvious. It's so cheesy, but now it cracks me up every time.


O.K. I had to dust off my copy and watch this one again.

I think everyone here knows what this is supposed to mean. When you've gone over something again and again and again and again like I have, certain questions get answered, others spring up, the mind plays tricks on you... (quotes from the movie)

So they're road signs and not construction barriers, and the fugitive (Mickey) was giving PeeWee a ride, my apologies. The visible bike chain could be a framing thing, but in the scene I mentioned even if you crop out the wheels the signs are being pulled on, you can still see (and hear?) the cables being used to pull them. Are they digitally erased in the DVD version as well? Could Burton and Rubens still be pulling our leg? As evidence, I noticed that the falling rocks in the scene come up again in the chase sequence on the WB lot. Fakery exposed!

It's like you're unravelling a big cable-knit sweater that someone keeps knitting and knitting and knitting and knitting and knitting and knitting and knitting.

More "neat" touches:

Phil Hartman who co-wrote the script appears in the last reel as a reporter.
PeeWee brushes his teeth before eating some MR. T cereal.
His correct weight: 98 pounds (weakling!)
Sign in door of Mario's Bike Shop is easy to read because it's backwards.
The animated eyes in the dark in "the middle of nowhere".
Large Marge! C'mon that's a classic! (...face looked like THIS!)
More Adult Stuff: Mickey leers suggestively at PeeWee in drag? What about this scene?
Simone: Do you hane any dreams?
PeeWee: (forgot exact quote)...rolling a doughnut and a snake wearing a vest...
Simone: No, not that kind of dream. (Freud! ROTFLMAO)
Then:
(Simone's boyfriend overhears)
PeeWee: Everyone I know has a big but(t). C'mon Simone, let's talk about your big but(t).
...
Simone: Oh PeeWee, I've been waiting for someone to put it to me like that for so long!
Chase scene on WB lot interrupts filming of Twisted Sister's Burn in Hell video. This is an actual shot set up from an actual music video and hell/devils is a motif in the movie.
The fake film within a film: James Brolin as PeeWee and Morgan Fairchild as Dottie. PeeWee's cameo in the FWAF is as a bellboy (Jerry Lewis tribute?) and he can't stop looking straight at the camera, flirting with the fourth wall. As extras walk left in the scene projected at the drive-in, PeeWee walks left at the same pace and is (fore?)shadowed by the extras in the film.
Jason Hervey (Kevin Arnold's mean older brother in The Wonder Years) portrays bi-polar kid actor Kevin Morton.

That's quite enough I'm sure.

Jekeira
08-11-2001, 11:26 AM
Originally posted by Cervaise


Say what you like about Unbreakable, pro or con, but there's a very cool bit of filmmaking late in the movie. (Skip to the next paragraph if you haven't seen the movie and plan to. Last warning...) When Bruce Willis goes to the house to rescue the family, there's a long shot where he goes into the upstairs bedroom and finds the woman tied up on the floor. The camera is outside the house, looking in through the window. Watch how the billowing curtains reveal first Bruce at the door, then the woman, then Bruce reacting, and so forth. It looks totally natural, but if you pay attention, it's clear this is an artificial and deliberate effect. Very subtle, and very cool filmmaking.



Cervaise, that scene really struck me too. I thought it was a very effective attempt to emulate the way comic book art works -- in a connected series of still "panels." The curtains part to reveal, first, the woman; then Bruce, unmoving; then the woman; then Bruce, still unmoving -- but now he's closer.

I'm not sure if I'm explaining this well, but the fact that you see action without ever seeing anyone move reminded me of the way some good comic book artists work, with the same image -- slightly changed -- repeated in consecutive panels. I thought it was a wicked cool scene.

Eutychus
08-11-2001, 11:30 AM
I just got finished watching "Dr. Strangelove" again, and one touch I had either not noticed or forgotten about happens when Slim Pickens is sitting on the bomb trying to get the bomb bay doors open. Lettered on the bombs are cautionary warnings "Nuclear Device : Handle with Care" and "This Side Down."

mack
08-11-2001, 04:02 PM
I can't imagine this being feasible in real life, but the scene in Three Kings, when Barlow stuck in his hell hole bunker uses a stolen cell phone and pow we're in a suburban home and his wife's on the line, was pretty amazing.

also, I thought the penis at the end of fight club was a nice touch.

jab1
08-11-2001, 04:37 PM
Originally posted by zev_steinhardt
In the scene in which the ark is opened, the villian (sorry, I don't remember his name)His name was "Rene Belloq".

who is wearing the imitation High Priest clothing is saying a prayer. Anyone familiar with Jewish prayers will recognize the prayer as brich sh'mei, a prayer said when the Ark in synagouge is opened. Unfortuantely, the Ark from the Tabernacle and the Ark in a synagouge (where the Torahs are kept) have nothing to do with each other.

The producers/writers probably asked someone to find out what prayer the Jews say when the Ark is opened and didn't bother to investigate further.

(FTR, there wouldn't be any prayers that were said when the Tabernacle ark was opened, since it wasn't opened on any regular basis.)I guess Steven Spielberg wasn't as attentive in temple as he should have been!

Dr. Rieux
08-11-2001, 05:51 PM
The use of oranges throughout all three Godfather movies.

GIGObuster
08-11-2001, 06:04 PM
Speaking of Dr. Strangelove"

I also saw it again recently and only then I noticed that early in the war room scene, George C Scott is talking to the President (of camera).
I always thought that both, Sellers as the President and Scott as the General, were talking to each other in “real time” but then I noticed, in a bigger TV, that Dr. Strangelove (also Peter Sellers) was one of the people present at the table a few seats away from Scott! Very impressive bit of acting and editing.

Spoke
08-11-2001, 07:16 PM
eunoia wrote:PeeWee's cameo in the FWAF is as a bellboy (Jerry Lewis tribute?)

Actually, that struck me as a sly reference to one of Paul Reubens/Pee Wee Herman's first film roles, as a desk clerk in Cheech and Chong's Next Movie (http://us.imdb.com/Title?0080520).

eunoia
08-11-2001, 08:56 PM
Originally posted by spoke-
eunoia wrote:PeeWee's cameo in the FWAF is as a bellboy (Jerry Lewis tribute?)

Actually, that struck me as a sly reference to one of Paul Reubens/Pee Wee Herman's first film roles, as a desk clerk in Cheech and Chong's Next Movie (http://us.imdb.com/Title?0080520).

Could be. Some Howie Hamburger Dude (http://us.imdb.com/Credits?0082163) references would have been funny too.

darik
08-11-2001, 09:24 PM
In The Boondock Saints, you can see William Dafoe's character become more and more involved in the flashbacks - in the last one he is actually in the flashback.

Crunchy Frog
08-11-2001, 10:09 PM
Another "Raiders of the Lost Ark" bit that I thought would have been mentioned by now.

Actually, it takes place in "Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade" when Indy and that film's love interest (I forget her name) are in the tunnel and she sees a drawing on the wall and asks what it is. (paraphrasing from memory here)

Indy: It's the Ark of the Covenant
Love interest: Are you sure?
Indy: Pretty sure.

I always liked that bit.

waterj2
08-12-2001, 02:17 AM
I was just watching the TV version of the Godfather saga, and noticed a really neat touch in a scene that had been cut out of the original release of Godfather: Part II. When Vito is holding the guns for Clemenza in return for the rug, they take them with Tessa to a gunsmith identified as August Coppola, who then introduces his young son Carmine. Carmine then proceeds to play a short tune on a flute. Carmine Coppola is Francis Ford Coppola's father, and also wrote the score of the movie. Having been born in 1910 would make him about the right age for the boy in the movie.

Joey P
07-31-2002, 06:48 PM
In Fear And Loathing when Depp says "Look at you man, you're all sideways"

In Hoy Grail when John Cleese says "She turned me into a Newt..[Long Pause]..I got better" That pause was improvised, it wasn't supposed to be so long, but it made it so much funnier.

WSLer
07-31-2002, 08:00 PM
I like how in Airplane! every time they show the plane in the air, it's in the middle of a thunderstorm and even though it's a jet, it sounds like a prop plane.

Grasshopper
07-31-2002, 09:24 PM
Oh, I have so many.

Little Shop of Horrors -
1) The first shot of Audrey II's face (this is when the plant is at its smallest) - the face is absolutely perfect. It looks cute and sweet and like something Seymour would pick out, but it's sinister looking too - you can tell it's headed for the bad side.

2) The front cover of the newspaper Mr. Mushnik reads at the very beginning of the movie says something like "Unexpected Total Eclipse of the Sun" and in one scene with Seymour (also at the beginning) the radio is playing in the background and Wink Wilkinson mentions the total eclipse of the sun - with both of these scenes of course being before the Da-Doo number which talks about the eclipse.

3) Along the same lines as #2 - when Seymour is being interviewed on the radio and Wink asks him where he found such an unusual plant and he mentins the eclipse and they replay the girls singing Da-doo as it goes into the next scene. (for those who haven't seen the movie, Seymour's line is the exact same introduction he used before actually going into Da-Doo, which was a few minutes earlier in the film, and this time.. oh forget it, is anybody else noticing these scenes are hard to descibe but they're so cool when you see them? bah)

4) The tupperware party in Somewhere That's Green. heh heh, cracks me up.

5) The entire Skid Row number with all the extras walking on the beat, it's a really nice touch.

Ahem, before I turn this into the "Cool Things about Little Shop of Horrors, the Greatest Movie in the World" thread...

Spaceballs
1) Next to Mr. Coffee is Mr. Radar, ha. Also, the main menu on the DVD is labeled Mr. DVD.

2) The scene where the camera is moving in on Dark Helmet to show him as very creepy and foreboding and then HA the camera bumps into him and knocks him over.

3) The scene where Dark Helmet and Lone Starr are dueling and Dark Helmet loses his balance or something and falls over onto the camera crew.

Airplane!
oh, too many to mention, BUT I love how after Elaine manually inflates Otto, the next shot of them together shows them both smoking.

And I love the part in Dirty Dancing where it shows Baby walking down the steps towards the main house and a few bars of I've had the Time of My Life plays on the piano, oooeee!

Dippin "Say goodbye to your two best friends, and I don't mean your pals in the Winnebago" Dots

Lionors
08-01-2002, 12:56 AM
Another one for 'Shawshank' - notice at the end of the movie, when Red gets out, he ends up in the same boarding house and the same room that Brooks had when he hung himself. I particularly liked the fact that Red found the carving Brooks had made in the arch near where he hung himself, right about the time when Red himself was at loose ends and wondering what he could do with the rest of his life.

X-Men: Cyclops' comment to Wolverine, when Wolverine's griping about the costumes, to the effect that maybe Wolverine would prefer yellow spandex. Of course, in the comics, Wolverine *did* have a costume of yellow spandex. Pretty funny.

The Untouchables: There are two shots in this move I've always loved, just for dramatic effect. The first is right after Pacino (as Al Capone) beats in the head of the thug who failed. The camera does this slow aerial pull back, and the blood is slowly spreading from the man's shattered head -- but from that vantage point and angle, it looks almost like spilled wine or something much less grotesque.

The second is right before Sean Connery's character gets killed, where the hit man is waiting on the windowsill and looking into the apartment. If you look closely, you can not only see a full view of what is going on inside the apartment (including Connery stalking around back and forth) but a perfect ghostly reflection of the hit man in the window -- yet there's no sign of the camera or any lighting. (Call me easily impressed, but that was back before computer generated effects would have made that easy to do.)

And last but not least, the entire St. Crispin's day battle scene in Henry V. Just incredible.

Son of Krypton
08-01-2002, 01:30 AM
This is easily the best I've ever seen:

Early in the first Back to the Future, Marty McFly takes off in the Delorean from the Twin Pines Mall.

He cruises back to 1955, where the Delorean comes to a stop by running over one of a pair of pine trees.

When Marty finally makes it back to 1985 to save Doc from the terrorists, he passes a sign at the shopping center. It reads Lone Pine Mall.

You gotta look quick; Spielberg doesn't linger.

Okay, second-best:

In Close Encounters, there's a scene where Richard Dreyfuss is zoning out, staring at the TV. The scene is shot from behind the TV set, so you can't see what's showing on the screen. But if you listen carefully, you'll hear the tinny speaker of the TV playing the voice of a slightly younger Dreyfuss, who is screaming at the mayor of Amityville, "Boating accident!? This is not a boating accident!"

anyrae
08-01-2002, 02:03 AM
This isn't from a movie, but it was really funny. If anyone watches soaps on abc, this was on One Life to Live at Asa's (faked his own death) funeral. Well Asa is one of the charcters that has been married like 9 times or so. So all of the ex-wives were there at his funeral. They showed each one sitting in the funeral reminicsing about their wedding to Asa, and showed the original clips of the weddings. I think these were really mostly the same actresses too. One of the ex-wives, who is also still a main character on the soap, was played by a different actress during the time she and Asa were married. Anyway, the funny part is, it shows Blair (the current one) remembering her wedding to Asa, they show a flashback clip of it and it is of course the other actress. The "old" Blair is asian, or at least has very dark hair and very different more exotic features that the current blonde haired, blue eyed Blair. So when current Blair snaps out of the little fanatsy, it shows her sitting there, at the funeral with a perplexed look on her face and she whips out a little cosmetic mirror and looks in it, only to look slightly more confused, but then sort of shrugs it off. Very funny to see that the people who write this stuff making fun of how goofy it is that the actors change and no one "in soap land" ever notices the sudden complete change this "soap person" has gone through.

Oh and the part in "Big Trouble in Little China" that someone else mentioned, I found that really funny too. He is looking all tough, but for the lipstick smeared on his face.

Shirley Ujest
08-01-2002, 08:57 AM
Mystery, Alaska

There is this micro scene with Russell Crowe and Cynthia Whatever, who plays his wife. They are sitting in the car waiting for the good news that they expect that Russell is back on the team. (This is the part) He gives his wife a look that, too me, just adds more to that little scene of the silent interaction between a husband and wife. (It also melts my insides all to mush.)

Shirley Ujest
08-01-2002, 09:06 AM
Mrs. Soffel . Mel Gibson is a convict in prison and Diane Keaton is the Wardens Wife. He falls in love with her and in one scene, thru the bars of the cell, all they do is hold hands. It was a very nice little part.

Lethal Weapon (Ok, I'm on a Mel Gibson kick right now, sue me.) When Riggs escapes Endo and busts into the room where Murtaugh is being held with his daughter and frees them, as Murtaugh and his daughter are getting up, and Riggs is in control of the situation. Riggs does a joke,

"What did one shepard say to the other shepard?"

"What?"

"Let's get the flock outta here."

I always liked that little touch. Just because you've escaped a bad assed torturer and killed half his dope smuggling buddies does not mean you have to take the situation that seriously. :D

CalMeacham
08-01-2002, 09:35 AM
Or when the Raptor is attacking Laura Dern in the generator room and its head brushes against the naked light bulb, you can see its skin searing from the heat.
Ray Harryhausen AFAIK did the special effects for a King Kong movie, the one where Kong fights a T-rex and for one brief instant during the fight the T-rex stops, scratches his nose, and continues, neat! Apparantly this was as much a side effect of being locked in a darkened room doing nothing but stop motion filmatography as anything else.


This detail is in King Kong, but Harryhausen didn't do it He wasn't in animation then. This was almost certainly Willis O'Brien (other people worked on animation for KK, but O'Brien was the boss). He'd used a similar detail in an earlier film, where the large prehistoric bird Diatryma scratched itself.

There are a lot of cute effects in early animation -- both eye-grabbing and subliminal effects. Just look at the incredible detail in, for instance, the scene where Kong derails the subway train. As Kong approaches the track you have silhouettes of people down at the bottom of the screen, and you have people in the window of the building moving and gesturing, and you get a train going by as well.

When Kong is in the cave at the base of Skull mountain you have him, the plesiosaur (which a lot of people thought was a snake), superimposed "steam" from the bubbling lake, and the figures of Ann Darrow (Fay Wray) and Driscoll (Bruce Armstrong) miniature rear-projected in. And these are alll moving in different ways, along with Kong himself.

NurseCarmen
08-01-2002, 10:25 AM
I'm amazed that there isn't more Coen brothers movies mentioned here, they are filled with these tiny "attention to detail" bits. My favorite is, in Raising Arizona, the theme music can be heard in different styles throughout the film. When H.I. is running through the grocary store getting shot at, it's playing as Muzak.

And the matching tattoos, the look that Leonard Smalls and H.I. give each other made me think it was a realization (Dad? Son?) then KABLOOEY!

the movie Angus had a similar musical stunt, the High School Band was playing Love Spit Love. The Coens did it first.

Sivalensis
08-01-2002, 03:03 PM
Ok, so I don't have time to read the whole thread right now, so sorry if I'm repeating anything here. One comes to mind really well for me.

Lethal Weapon 4 - when riggs and murtaugh are chasing the chinese mafia guys on the highway, riggs says something like "what I wouldn't give for a siren right about now." Well, in the original version, they just kept on going. In the dvd version, however, murtaugh lets out this big siren with his head stuck out the window, some wonderful Danny Glover improv that had me rolling on the floor!

minlokwat
08-01-2002, 05:05 PM
Lord a-mighty. Someone actually resurrected this old thread. (Almost exactly one year after it was started).

Well let me add one from Honeymoon in Vegas.

Still fairly early in the movie. They're in the hotel room and Nicholas Cage is freaking out that his fiancee, played by Sarah Jessica Parker, is actually going to go through with the weekend jaunt with the mobster -James Caan.

Cage is alternating between screaming, hysteria, pleading and so on and then at one point he spies a fruit basket. Without thinking, he picks up an apple and takes a bite out of it and then realizes why in God's name am I eating at a time like this??

Don't know whose idea it was but it is definitely a quirky touch to a great scene.

athene1765
08-01-2002, 05:13 PM
Best moment in a movie: Silence of the Lambs, when Lecter is giving Starling the maps and folders she'd left with him, near the very end of the movie. She's dashed back away from the police to grab the papers; Lecter is standing there very calmly with his arm outstretched. She seizes the papers from his hand and -- for just about half a second -- the camera zooms in on their hands, where his index finger moves across hers briefly and gently before she dashes off again. Her movements are so large and dramatic; his very subtle stance and gestures are such a contrast.

Best moment in a TV show: Sue me for being a Buffy fan, but their best episode (IMHO) was one of those where Buf nearly gets killed. She decides to go talk to Spike, who's killed two Slayers so far, to find out how to keep from dying, figure out how he killed the others so he can prevent it. The scenes in the flashback where he is describing the second Slayer he killed -- a pretty black girl in a New York subway, wearing the same leather trench Spike has been wearing since his first episode in Buffy -- smoothly parallel his gestures as he describes the event, as though he can remember every single movement he made some thirty years ago. Almost as impressive as that is the end of the episode, when Buffy blows him off with the same words the lady he loved over 100 years ago used. The building fury and its resolution at the end of the episode is marvelous.

Kaitlyn
08-01-2002, 05:48 PM
Another one from Shawshank. After Brooks is parolled, he sends a letter to the gang, in which he jokes about killing the manager of the FoodWay to get sent back to prison. Red gives his speech about how a prisoner can become institutionalized to the point that the prison becomes home. He's ostensibly talking about Brooks, but also about himself, and how he fears that he wouldn't be able to make it on the outside.

After being paroled, there are many scenes paralleling Brooks' parole, and showing Red's growing despair. At one point, Red is looking in the window of a pawn shop while his voice over says something like "I find myself thinking of ways to violate my parole," while the camera pans across the items in the window, showing us what Red is looking at. As he delivers the line, the camera pans across a group of guns, but continues past them to stop on a compass. It's a wonderful visual way of showing Red's making up his mind to move forward rather than live in the past.

In Blood Simple, one of the shots in the bar begins at the end of the bar, focusing on two people talking at the other end. Halfway down the bar, a man is slumped passed out. The camera tracks slowly down the bar until it gets too close to the passed-out drunk to see him, at which point the actor would normally move and the camera would continue to move smoothly down the bar. Instead, the camera raises up slightly, then comes back down to bar level, as if passing over the drunk. The nice thing is that the man almost certainly moved to allow the passage of the camera, so the up and down movement is a deliberate, unnecessary insertion.

In The Parallax View, except for gunshots, the action sequences are played without sound effects, the noise being drowned out by environmental noises or background music, most notably when the waiter tries to escape on top of the Space Needle, Beatty's fight witht the sheriff next to the dam, and Beatty trying to escape the auditorium at the end.

In the musical New York, New York, there is no background music until the closing credits.

Roadwalker
08-01-2002, 10:10 PM
The Graduate. WEhen Katherene Ross's character reaized the truth, her character comes into focus.
IMHO one of the best tricks done in movies ever.

The Jabberwock
08-01-2002, 11:05 PM
Planet of the Apes, the new one. Charlton Heston, who of course was the human protagonist Taylor in the original, plays the ape villain's father in the remake. A nice touch in itself, but as he dies, he chokes out, "Damn them. Damn them all to Hell!" speaking of the humans, which was of course his famous line from the end of the original.

A little more subtle is the neatness which happens before Heston's character dies. He instructs his son, General Thade, to go and break open a large red pot-type thing, which he finds to contain a handgun made by humans thousands of years ago. Heston says something to the effect of, "This is the evidence of their power and cruelty..." and explains how the gun is the great human tool of destruction and so on. Does anyone else find it slightly ironic that Charlton Heston is delivering a speech on the dangers of guns?

lee
08-01-2002, 11:30 PM
In the "War of the Copraphages" episode of the X-Files which is about roaches, during one sceen, they added a roach that looks as if it is crawling across your television screen, not in the shot at all. Freaked me out.

Pope George Ringo
08-02-2002, 12:07 AM
In Buckaroo Banzai we never did find out what that watermelon was doing there.

BabaBooey
08-02-2002, 12:48 AM
Originally posted by ITR champion
All three of the Naked Gun movies have a lot of nice touches. In 2 and 1/2, there's bar scene near the start that's meant to parody various classic film noire scenes. The pictures on the wall show the Titanic sinking, the Hindenburg disaster, and a Nazi rally.

You forget the punchline, a picture of Michael Duchachas (sp?).

I always notice neat things in movies, but the only one that comes to mind is from a TV show. I love how the Tick always kept previous episodes in mind, i.e the moon having the beginning of Chairface's name carved into it, being bitten into...

sirtonyh
08-02-2002, 03:15 AM
Originally posted by athene1765
Best moment in a movie: Silence of the Lambs, when Lecter is giving Starling the maps and folders she'd left with him, near the very end of the movie. She's dashed back away from the police to grab the papers; Lecter is standing there very calmly with his arm outstretched. She seizes the papers from his hand and -- for just about half a second -- the camera zooms in on their hands, where his index finger moves across hers briefly and gently before she dashes off again. Her movements are so large and dramatic; his very subtle stance and gestures are such a contrast.


That half a second is the only time that Lecter and Clarice actually touch each other in the whole movie. Another great thing about that movie is that the camera gradually moves closer and closer whenever Lecter and Clartice are together. This happens slowly and subtly through the course of the movie, eventually moving in close enough to eliminate the bars between Lecter and Clarice. I loved that touch.

zephonith
08-02-2002, 06:31 AM
A friend of mine told me about a movie he saw where something flashes briefly onto the screen. When you go back and freeze frame it, you find that it says "Nice work with the Pause button dumbass" or something to the effect. Does anyone know this movie?

smiling bandit
08-02-2002, 08:05 AM
I have another X-Men neat-o-trick.

In the "school" scene wherein Xavier is describing his methods for teaching young mutants while keeping them safe, one shot shows the teens (including Rogue) in class. Jubilation "Jubilee" Lee is the one wearing the bright yellow coat and the neon short (she popped up in the late 80's, I think). Bobby, the teen with the ice control powers, is the boy Rogue has a crush on and Mystique imperonates. Kitty Pride is a long-time X regular, though she moved on to another comic some time ago. All are old "X-team" favorites.

Hugh Jackman is now my favorite Aussie for his exclellent portrayal of the loner Woloverine. Note his use of the word "Bub", used like I might say "Buddy" or "Pal" or such. This is one of the character's big traits in the comics.

This may or may not be something... but Sabertooth and Wolverine had some sort of past association and utterly hated each other in the comics. Neither one ever could kill the other since they were so well matched, and each simply didn't have the kind of damage-dealing capability to take out the other one (re: healing factor). In the movie, Sabertooth attacks Wolverine and seems to *really* dislike him Though its not elaborated on, Sabertooth noticably tries to get Wolvie in the flick.

Senator Kelly is a long-time background character in X-Men. He's an honorable man, but very afeared of what unrestricted mutants may do to the nation. He's the leader of the Mutant Registration Act, though he lives a lot longer in the comics. I think he recently died, but I could be wrong.

Henry Gyrich is mentioned in the film as being Kelly's aid, but found dead, "mauled by a bear". The implicaton is that Sabertooth killed him. In the comics, Gyrich is a top-ranking intelligence official with broad oversight for the USA in dealing with some mutant affairs. Exactly what he could do is unknown, but it is known he's dealth with super-technology and hhas tried to deal with some of the more troublesome mutant criminals.

Jonathan Chance
08-02-2002, 08:25 AM
Originally posted by Pope George Ringo
In Buckaroo Banzai we never did find out what that watermelon was doing there.

Ah, but all is explained in the DVD...

I'm such a tease.

Here's one from the recent Harry Potter movie:

After Hagrid picks up Harry and they're in London Hagrid takes him to The Leaky Cauldron, a pub for wizard folk.

Notice the pub sign outside. From a middle distance it's completely obscured. It's as if the pub has been out of business for decades (centuries) and no one has maintained it.

However, as Hagrid and Harry get closer to the pub the sign suddenly clears up and can be clearly read. It's as if it's designed to hide itself until people with wizrard powers approach and only then does it advertise itself.

Hoopy Frood
08-02-2002, 08:41 AM
Another nice touch in back to the future is the changing of the name "Barton Ravine" to "Eastwood Ravine."

And the movie scene Biff is watching in his hotel in Part II (during alternate 1985) where Clint Eastwood is wearing the steel plating as a bullet shield (Fistfull of Dollars), is recreated when Marty squares off against Buford Tannen. Buford is also mentioned in a promotional video that plays outside the hotel.

The neat little easter eggs Zemeckis (and Spielberg probably had a hand in as well) throws into the whole trilogy are too numerous to count. Still one of the best movie trilogy's ever made.

One nice touch in a Zucker brothers movie that has yet to be mentioned is in Top Secret when Nick Rivers (Val Kilmer), distraught when realizing he may lose the woman he's interested in, is rehashing the events of what have happened in the movie, and the woman responds with "It seems like it's all a bad movie." (or something similar), and the two stop what they're doing and cast sideways glances at the camera.

I though it was also nice how Fincher and Walker worked the last two deadly sins into the plot line of Se7en. Although the end results were rather predictable, I didn't expect the events to tie in the way they did. Very cool.

The dentist's name in M*A*S*H is "Painless." Painless wants to commit suicide because he's impotent. The theme song of the movie is "Suicide is Painless." The song being sung during the suicide scene is "Suicide is Painless" as well.

Then there's A Christmas Story when everyone (even Santa Claus) tells the protagonist that he can't have a Red Ryder air rifle due to the fact that "he'll shoot his eye out." And then when he finally gets one, he end up shooting himself in the face with it (though causing no permanent damage). Icidentally, the old Interplay computer game Wasteland makes a couple references to the Red Ryder.

Spinal Tap when the bands latest drummer spontaneously combusts on stage, continuing the band's bad luck with drummers always dying.

Hoopy Frood
08-02-2002, 08:43 AM
Clarification on the Chritmas story. I just remembered the kid wears glasses, and actually does shoot his eye, but the glasses take all the damage (and I believe the lens is cracked). It's been a while since I saw it.

The Tooth
08-02-2002, 09:39 AM
The transitions from Klingon to English in Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country are very clever.

In the first one, the Chancellor's daughter is talking with her counselors about what to do about Kirk. She says words to the effect of "this is what my father believed in" in Klingon. Christopher Plummer is listening from a distance, and his first words in the scene are "Tss tss tss. Your father was killed for what he believed in" in English. The scene finishes off in English.

During Kirk and McCoy's trial, Christopher Plummer is speaking in Klingon while Kirk and McCoy hold radios to their ears. Plummer starts a sentence in Klingon, then the scene cuts to a room where Klingon translators are sitting. They pick up, in English, right where Plummer leaves off. The scene then cuts back to the courtroom, where Plummer picks up right where the translators leave off, but now he's speaking English. Meanwhile, Kirk and McCoy are still obviously listening to their radios, waiting for the translations to come through before they answer. Very nice.

N9IWP
08-02-2002, 10:16 AM
In Star Wars Ep 1, when they tour Watoo(sp?)'s junkyard, one of the objects in it is a pod from 2001.

there are a zillion movie references in Chicken Run, so I don't count them as "little touches", but you know thay made the science chicken Scottish so she could do a Scotty joke or two...

The fact that they played the old Spiderman theme (Spiderman, Spiderman, does whatever a spider can...) during the credits of the recent movie.

The cast autographs during the credits for Star Trek VI

The fact that they dedicated Star Trek IV(?) and VI to the Challenger Crew and Gene R. respectively.

I'll second or third Bob Kane's drawing in Batman.

The chapter references in LOTR:FOTR

Brian

Sublight
08-02-2002, 11:58 AM
I was just watching Uzumaki again tonight, and noticed something I had missed before.

After Shunichi, Oshima and Tanaka (the investigator) watch the video that Shunichi's father shot of himself committing suicide, Tanaka shuts off the TV. For a brief moment, but very clearly, you see the reflections in the TV screen of Shunichi, Oshima, Tanaka and Shunichi's father. None of the characters see it, the camera doesn't focus or linger on it, and the music doesn't indicate anything scary has happened.

Creepy.

Mr. Miskatonic
08-02-2002, 01:20 PM
Its not a movie...

But the The Tick (The cartoon, not the live-action) had a season running gag with the moon. First Chairface Chippendale tried to crave his name in it, but only got as far as the third letter.

In subsequent episodes, the Moon is shown with a "CHA" carved in it.

In a later epsiode, the Tick goes up to the Moon with explosives to repair the damage. A mishap ru8ins the project and sends the Tick to Omnipitus, who comes to Earth and is barely talked out of eating the Earth. But Tick agrees to let him take a bite out of the moon, which is heard off-screen as a large chomping sound.

In subsequent episodes, the Moon appears with a "CHA" carved in it as well as having a huge bit (with teeth marks) taken out of it.

The capper is a nightime scen with a car driving past a beuatiful moon with all the aforementioned damage. ONnthe car radio a as ong plays with a Salsa beat:

"I'd take a bite out of the Moon for youuuuuu!

:D

JSexton
08-02-2002, 02:14 PM
Originally posted by ToobaTeacher
I just love that Hitchcock appeared in all of his films.


One of the best of these was Lifeboat. It took place on lifeboat with a cast of six, IIRC. How on earth could he make a cameo? By appearing on the back page of a newspaper read by a cast member in a weightloss before and after picture. Brilliant, and even mocked himself by using the classic Hitchcock profile.

Justin

gsteinma
08-02-2002, 02:39 PM
Two of my favorites:

In the much underrated Disney's "Hunchback of Notre Dame", most of the songs and musical score has a chorus that sings in Latin - and not only is it real Latin, it all relates to the scene and the song - but you would only know this if you bought the soundtrack and read the liner notes (or were fluent in Latin), and some of it is actual lines from Catholic mass!

Another favorite is from"Edward Scissorhands" - all that sinsiter machinery and what does it make? Sugar cookies!

andrew dupont
08-02-2002, 03:59 PM
Another from Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventure...when all the historical figures are at the mall. I believe it's right after Socrates and Billy the Kid hit on the women that Freud comes by.

He's eating a corndog.

That one scene just about sums up the movie for me. It's so much more clever than it appears to be at first glance.

Sauron
08-02-2002, 05:00 PM
Couple that I don't think have been mentioned:

I've always heard that in Raiders of the Lost Ark, when Indy and Salla are hoisting the Ark out of its resting place, you can see drawings of R2-D2 and C3PO on the wall behind them. I've never been able to see them, though.

In Iron Giant, near the end, the giant uses the same words to Hogarth that Hogarth said to him when they first met in the forest (something like "You stay here. No following."). The giant then takes off to detonate the nuclear missile.

Rilchiam
08-07-2002, 04:20 AM
Originally posted by FireUnderpantsBoobs
Professor Henry Jones: We named the *dog* Indiana.
Marcus Brody: May we go home now, please?
Sallah: The dog?! You are named after the dog?!
Indiana Jones: I've got a lot of fond memories of that dog.

For all who don't know, Indiana was the name of George Lucas' dog.

Not a "neat touch", but that reference immediately made me think of The Last Detail. Anyway, there's a scene where the three main characters meet a group of non-Asian Buddhists (early '70s). They're outside an apartment building and hear the Buddhists chanting nam-ya-ho-renge-kyo, which to them just sounds like incomprehensible twanging, and "Mule" says, "What the hell is an Indiana dog?".

So. Neat touches.

---The shot in Titanic where only the stern is still visible.
TITANIC

LIVERPOOL

Two years to build, two hours to destroy.

---One of the Airplane gags is now outdated; I wonder how many people still really get it. Either McCroskey or Kramer asks one of the control-room guys to "check the radar range". He opens the door of an Amana RadarRange (early microwave) and reports, "About two more minutes, Chief!"

---As someone already mentioned, there are numerous "neat touches" in Chicken Run, but I have to note the scene where the chickens are dancing. Nick and Fetcher are watching from the rafters, and Nick inclines his head towards Fetcher. You know he's going to say, "D'you wanna dance?" And Fetcher is obliged to mumble, "Y'all right."

---Dante in Clerks pouring milk into the lid of the sugar jar, then dumping in a buttload of sugar. No cereal, just sugar and milk. That combination is even more effective than coffee for jumpstarting one's system in the morning.

---In True Romance, Christian Slater and Patricia Arquette are married by a JP. We don't see the ceremony, but we do see them walking down the steps of the courthouse, with her carrying a rather large bouquet. When he returns to their apartment after killing Gary Oldman's character, we see the flowers jammed into a gallon bottle that formerly held Gatorade.

---In Heathers, the main character and her supposedly unsuitable friend are named Veronica and Betty, last names Sawyer and Finn.

Mangetout
08-07-2002, 06:13 AM
Maybe Baby (http://us.imdb.com/Title?0206926), written by Ben Elton is autobiographical (the film is about a couple trying to concieve a child); Ben Elton had the same sorts of problems (I suppose that's what inspired a lot of the material), but here's the good bit; a major part of the plot consists of the lead male writing down his life story as a screenplay (sort of recursive reference to Ben Elton writing the screenplay).

ElwoodCuse
08-07-2002, 09:17 AM
ITR, you missed the punchline to the Naked Gun joke. There's picture of the Titanic, the Hindenburg, and...Michael Dukakis.

Hello Kitty: See You Next Wednesday is also on a billboard in "The Blues Brothers".

Also, in Fight Club, Ed Norton and Brad Pitt "switch sides" after their car crashes. The editor originally told Fincher there was a continuity error, but it of course is part of the story.

For the sheer number of references I don't think you can beat "Jay and Silent Bob Strike Back". On the commentary Kevin Smith was talking about how when they marketed the film, they were careful to say it stands for itself and you don't need to have seen the other movies. Then he says something like, well, now that it's on DVD, I can tell you that's all bullshit. You really need to have seen several dozen movies for you to understand this one.

Pábitel
08-07-2002, 10:09 AM
Originally posted by Zoggie
Bill and Ted's Excellent Adventure- I really liked how at the end, when they're giving their presentation, they interview Freud. Freud "examines" Ted, and then asks Bill if he'd like to be psychologically examined, too. Bill responds, saying, "Nah, I just have a mild Oedipal complex" an the camera pans to Missy, his hot stepmom. The whole moment was really great for some reason. I liked that even though it's just a "fun" movie, they would include a term that not a lot of people might know. Not something they would do in a more recent flick, IMO.

The one I find classic in Bill & Ted is the scene in the mall where Billy the Kid and Socrates are picking up chicks and Freud walks up holding a corn dog. As he bombs with the girls the corn dog goes slowly from an upright position to hanging limply. A wonderful graphical nod to Freud's sexual symbolism.

The first time I saw this movie I was showing it to a class of highschool kids as a substitute teacher on the last day of school or something in a history class. When this scene rolled around I almost got a hernia holding in the laughter. None of the kids got it and I didn't want to draw attention to it.

etv78
08-07-2002, 05:49 PM
Buddy Ebsen played Barnaby Jones in the "Beverly Hillbillies" movie.

FriarTed
08-07-2002, 11:50 PM
A Clockwork Orange- after Alex takes his dive, the newspaper story text lists his last name as "Burgess" tho it was clearly stated in the Prison entry scene as DeLarge. Burgess of course is the last name of ACO's author- Anthony.

Last Temptation of Christ- Jesus saves Mary Mag from stoning &
someone bounces a rock off his chest & He looks like He's holding Himself back from busting some heads.

HubZilla
08-08-2002, 05:36 AM
Originally posted by The Devil's Grandmother
In the first Superman movie, Reeves needs to change his clothes and dashed past a modern phone “booth”. He pauses just long enough to look it up and down; moves on. I thought it was the funniest moment in the movie.

On a similar note, I loved the "Holy Rusted Metal" in Batman Forever!

Agrippina
08-08-2002, 09:12 AM
In Silence of the Lambs, when Lecter is talking with Senator Martin I love the look of his eyes when he says, "Love your suit."

BabaBooey
08-08-2002, 09:31 PM
I'm glad someone mentioned Top Secret as it reminded me of the library scene. I think that was one of the most incredible scenes I've ever seen, guess I'm a simple man.

BTW, how many people actually read the thread before posting? Two people repeated what I said, and they only had to read this one page...

Phoenix Dragon
08-09-2002, 12:50 AM
Ronin. What the hell was in the case??? :)