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Lucifer12
08-28-2001, 11:04 AM
This is no doubt a perennial thread, but if you're like me, the answers change every few months or so. Also, I'm looking for something new to read and would like some suggestions. Right now I'd have to say my current faves are:

'Extraordinary Popular Delusions & the Madness of Crowds'
by Charles MacKay
-------------

'The Old Patagonia Express'
by Paul Theroux
(Really, just about any of Theroux's travel books-this one is my favorite, tho)
-------------

'Fast One'
by Paul Cain

'White Jazz'
by James Ellroy

'Mona Lisa Overdrive'
by Wlliam Gibson

(These are my favorite hard-boiled detective/crime books. I know Gibson is sci-fi, but I think of his stuff as being really rooted in hard-boiled pulp fiction.)
-------------

'Frankenstein'
by Mary Shelley
(I had never actually read this before - it really is an excellent book! It wasn't terribly frightening, but it's really a well-thought-out rebuttal to the Enlightenment.)

That's just a few I'd recommend. What say you?

tiny ham
08-28-2001, 11:12 AM
Well, these aren't going to be sci fi recommmendations, but I love them anyway:

A Prayer For Owen Meany by John Irving should be read by everyone alive.

My favorite book of all time is The Collector by John Fowles, I've read it a million times and it only takes about 3 hours to get through (less than 300 pages I believe)

The Secret History by Donna Tartt made me want to be a better writer, and also go back to college. It's fascinating.

Those are definitely my top three.

jarbaby

Green Eyed Stranger
08-28-2001, 11:14 AM
My two absolute favorite books are:
The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas (get the unabridged version if you can find it)

and

Fletch by Gregory MacDonald (Much, much better than the movie. I believe the book won an Edgar award).

GES

CalMeacham
08-28-2001, 11:15 AM
Well, the Straight Dope books, of course....


Bergen Evans' books A Natural History of Nonsense and the other one I can't recall.

Mark Twain's Life on the Mississippi

Frederick Forsyth's The Day of the Jackal

David Macaulay's The Great Bridge

Martin Gardner's The Whys of a Philosophical Scrivener

any of C.S. Forester's "Horatio Hornblower" novels

Any of Robert S. van Gulik's "Judge Dee" novels

Marvin Harris' Cows, Pigs, Wars, and Witches

Richard Feynman's Lectures on Physics

Michael Faraday's Chemical History of a Candle

Neil Simon's Plays

The Science Fiction Hall of Fame Volumes I, IIA, and IIB

GrizzRich
08-28-2001, 11:18 AM
"Hot Zone"
Kind of introduced Americans to the ebola scare. It's a true story and part of it happened just a few miles from where I lived at the time.

If the first chapter doesn't scare the bejeezus out of you, then you're not human.

Chum
08-28-2001, 02:46 PM
My favorite novel is, by far, East of Eden by John Steinbeck. I think that everyone should read this novel.

CrankyAsAnOldMan
08-28-2001, 02:53 PM
I had to say that I just love these threads. I always open them with delight, can't wait to see what people suggest.

Some of my best reads over the past year have been from Doper suggestions.

Chance the Gardener
08-28-2001, 03:01 PM
Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain. Yeah, you probably read it in high school, but read it again. It's one of America's greatest novels.

Catch-22 by Joseph Heller. I've read it three times. Incredible.

A Confederacy of Dunces by John Kennedy Toole. I have never read any other book like it. This book is painful and hilarious, and I mourn the fact that Toole killed himself before writing a follow-up.

Bluebeard by Kurt Vonnegut. This pretty much sums up what I feel about art.

Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger. The younger you are when you pick this one up, the better. I read it when I was 22, and I wish I'd found it earlier.

Alex Mendelsohn, Boy from Mars by Daniel Pinkwater. Technically, it's a young-adult novel, but much of it works for adults, too.

Young Adult Novel (alternatively titles Young Adults by Daniel Pinkwater. Not really a young-adult novel. But it's a corker!

I'm sure there are more, but this is all I'm coming up with off the top of my head. Read these books, folks. You'll thank me.

Ukulele Ike
08-28-2001, 03:20 PM
Originally posted by Lucifer12
'White Jazz'
by James Ellroy


Yeccccch. WHITE JAZZ was horrible. If you read closely (well, you don't even have to read it THAT closely) you can tell where Sonny Mehta or his assistant threw up his hands and completely gave up on the editing.

If you MUST read Ellroy (and I don't recommend it. the man is a grossly egotistical self-publicist, not a serious novelist) read THE BLACK DAHLIA. AT least he was still striving for coherence back in '87.



Now, if you want to read something really REALLY hot, try THE MANUSCRIPT FOUND IN SARAGOSSA by Jan Potocki. I'm up to the 27th Day, and I'm fascinated.

Gorgon Heap
08-28-2001, 03:29 PM
Some of those I would have suggested have already been named, so my list is pretty short. However, I must concur with Chance the Gardener; Catch-22. A great book, that.

1984, George Orwell - I barely survived that one with my sanity intact.

Hitchiker's Guide to the Galaxy collection, Douglas Adams - Not only hysterical, but includes slyly hidded satire at anything you can think of.

Not a book, but: the essay A Modest Proposal, Jonathan Swift - Hey, I love satire. And it's all sooooo true.

Lucifer12
08-28-2001, 03:50 PM
Originally posted by Ukulele Ike
Originally posted by Lucifer12
'White Jazz'
by James Ellroy


Yeccccch. WHITE JAZZ was horrible. If you read closely (well, you don't even have to read it THAT closely) you can tell where Sonny Mehta or his assistant threw up his hands and completely gave up on the editing.


Hmm. 'White Jazz' always seems to stir up controversy, especially among Ellroy fans. Seems like a love-or-hate thing. I loved it, although I haven't gotten around to 'Black Dahlia' yet.

gobear
08-28-2001, 04:07 PM
Guns, Germs, and Steel by Jared Diamond--An excellent book to rebut racists

Vanity Fair by William Makepeace Thackeray--Absolutely one of the best satires of human behavior ever

Three Men in a Boat by Jerome K. Jerome--The ideal book to read by a riverside

Mathematics: From The Birth of Numbers by Jan Gullberg--Not a book to be devoured, but one to pick up and browse through. If you weren't fascinated by numbers before, you will be after reading this book!

The Way Things Work by David McCaulay--It's a profusely illustrated book that uses a perplexed mammoth to show how everyday technology works. Guranteed to demystify the gadgets in your life.

Anything by Terry Pratchett

Eve
08-28-2001, 04:16 PM
Laff-out-loud books, all easily findable on sites like http://www.bookfinder.com

• Gentlemen Prefer Blondes and Gentlemen Marry Brunettes, purportedly by Anita Loos (but I suspect they were ghosted by her hubby, John Emerson)

• Show Girl and Hollywood Girl, by J.P. McEvoy

• Little Me, by Patrick Dennis (of Mame fame)

• Pink & White Tyranny by Harriet Beecher Stowe (yes, she DID write something else besides Uncle Tom's Cabin, and this is a delight!)

• Every Other Inch a Lady, Bea Lillie's hilarious memoirs

sjc
08-28-2001, 04:29 PM
The Language Instinct by Steven Pinker. An interesting book about linguistics (for a general audience).

Snow Crash by Neal Stephenson. Great Sci-Fi about a not too distant future.

Also by Neal Stephenson The Diamond Age. Really cool conception of nanotechnology. Both The Diamond Age and Snow Crash have great descriptions of the social structures in which they take place. (If that makes any sense. "Really cool futuristic worlds" may be easier to understand, but it doesn't quite capture what I'm trying to describe).

Just about anything by Oliver Sacks. I particularly recommend The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat, An Anthropologist on Mars, and Island of the Colorblind.

Umberto Eco is a good Author as well. In the Name of the Rose is a great book, especially after studying up on the Medieval world. (I reread it while I was taking an art history course on the art of the medieval world ans rennaisance and it was even better.) I also recommend Foucalt's Pendulum this is a perfect book for Dopers. It combines virtually every conspiracy theory into one Mutha of a Conspiracy Theory. The cool thing is that the people who create this conspiracy know that they are just making it up, at least in the beginning. It is a perfect illustration of how the human mind creates patterns and draws connections whether they exist or not.

caircair
08-28-2001, 04:32 PM
Top of them all:

"A Tree Grows in Brooklyn" by Betty Smith.

I also recommend "Our Kate" by Catherine Cookson.

There are far too many books to list, all in all. These are a good start, though.

Maeglin
08-28-2001, 05:14 PM
The Secret History by Donna Tartt made me want to be a better writer, and also go back to college. It's fascinating.

Seriously? Several people recommended it to me, so I gave it a try. All twenty pages or so. I thought it was unbearable.

Manda JO
08-28-2001, 05:46 PM
One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel Garcia Marquez

Ender's Game by Orson Scott Card

The Princess Bride by William Goldman

And I am currently going through a very pro Westmark phase. This is a trilogy by Lloyd Alexander that everyone should be required to read when they are 12. Unfortunantly, the center book is out of print. Why do they do that!?

JillGat
08-28-2001, 05:48 PM
Originally posted by GrizzRich
"Hot Zone"
Kind of introduced Americans to the ebola scare. It's a true story and part of it happened just a few miles from where I lived at the time.

If the first chapter doesn't scare the bejeezus out of you, then you're not human.

I have a photo on my desk here of Richard Preston, author of Hot Zone, signed, "Greetings Jill, from Kitum Cave."
..cough..

Yes, and his non-fiction is better/scarier than his fiction (better than most fiction)! I would also recommend The Coming Plague by Laurie Garrett.

k.os
08-28-2001, 06:49 PM
The Illuminatus! Trilogy by Robert Anton Wilson and Robert Shea and Shödinger's Cat by Wilson as well. Both have a very interesting writing style and are extremely thought-provoking.

Both books are hard to sum up, but in a nutshell, Illuminatus! is THE novel about conspiracy theories, conspiracy theorists and the supernatural. Maybe not the most "scientific" subjects, but the treatment is fascinating and even though the trilogy is about 800-900 pages, it's a page turner.

Schrödinger's Cat is, again in a very big nutshell, 3 days happening over and over again in alternate realities, with different parameters and different outcomes.

Schrödinger's Cat is also a sequel of sorts to Illuminatus! and even though you don't have to read them in order, if you plan on reading both I recommend to follow the order.

The style of writing in these books in very interesting.

Other recommendations:

William S. Burrough - Cities of the Red Night. Absolutely fascinating, but not for the faint of heart! Easily shocked sensibilities should definitely stay away from anything by Burroughs or Wilson.

Other favorites of mine were already mentionned, so there is no point in going over them again...

drm
08-28-2001, 07:02 PM
I've always enjoyed Ayn Rand, both Atlas Shrugged and The Fountainhead are books that I couldn't put down. You have to be prepared to set aside a few days however...

Enderw24
08-28-2001, 07:14 PM
I don't read. It's against my religion. Besides, even if I did read, I really don't know if I'd ever be able to narrow it down to just one book.
<--------------------
*cough*

teela brown
08-28-2001, 07:35 PM
If you like sci-fi, you've probably already read these titles. I cite them because like "Mona Lisa Overdrive", they are both sci-fi and hard-boiled gumshoe detective fiction:

"The Long Arm of Gil Hamilton" by Larry Niven
"Ringworld" by Larry Niven

I read few spy/war novels, but I loved these:

"The Spy Who Came In From The Cold" by John Le Carre
"The Hunt For Red October" by Tom Clancy

If it's not too late for a little light summer reading, try:

"A Year In Provence" by Peter Mayle
"Wanda Hickey's Night of Golden Memories" by Jean Shepherd

And lastly, a couple of 19th century English classics:

"Barry Lyndon" by William Makepeace Thackeray
"Villette" by Charlotte Bronte
"Nicholas Nickleby" by Charles Dickens

Kat
08-28-2001, 08:16 PM
I've got a new one on my list. I just finished reading American Gods by Neil Gaiman.

DPWhite
08-28-2001, 08:24 PM
I haven't seen Moby Dick, an all time great. Read it slowly.

Oh, and my friend W recommends The Very Hungry Catapillar

DPWhite
08-28-2001, 08:26 PM
I mean I haven't seen Moby Dick posted. Read the book, saw the movie. Both great.

KarlGauss
08-28-2001, 08:56 PM
Non-fiction: The Making of the Atomic Bomb by Richard Rhodes. Superb in every way - as a set of biographies, as a history book, and as a physics primer.

Fiction: Being There by Jerzy Kosinski. Read it!

And, 'cause I just finished it and loved it: Cryptonomicon by Neal Stephenson. If you like codes, computers, and modern history, it's for you.

I will resist the temptation to list all my favourite science biographies eg. Turing, Bohr, Heisenberg. Let me know if you're interested.

CalMeacham
08-28-2001, 09:18 PM
Just finished reading this: The Great Arc

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0060932953/qid=999047792/sr=2-1/002-1567122-6333629

G. Nome
08-29-2001, 03:50 AM
Kinflicks by Lisa Alther
A Capote Reader - Truman Capote

maryliza
08-29-2001, 04:03 AM
Originally posted by KarlGauss
Cryptonomicon by Neal Stephenson. If you like codes, computers, and modern history, it's for you.
[/B]

Agreed. I thought it was the best of Neal Stephenson's books.

Also, I've said it before and I'll say it again, Infinite Jest by David Foster Wallace is one of the best books I've ever read.

Anything by Dickens, but David Copperfield is one of my perennial favorites.

Denis Johnson writes great books. Already Dead is a trip.

Anything by Philip K. Dick, but especially The Man in the High Castle.

Ok, I'll stop now.

Jeff
08-29-2001, 05:59 AM
To anyone reading 1984, I'd whole-heartedly recommend reading Brave New World as well. Also the short stories of Anton Chekhov are an excellent read. Though it is fairly obscure, I'd also recommend Second Skin by John Hawkes; it's gothic, gloomy, psychological and surprisingly humorous at the same time.

Qwertyasdfg
08-29-2001, 10:30 AM
[b]The Grapes of Wrath
1984
Fahrenheit 451

tiny ham
08-29-2001, 10:38 AM
Originally posted by Maeglin
The Secret History by Donna Tartt made me want to be a better writer, and also go back to college. It's fascinating.

Seriously? Several people recommended it to me, so I gave it a try. All twenty pages or so. I thought it was unbearable.

Well, I'm not a big literary genius so I'm not used to knowing what's good and what isn't. :D It did take a while for me to get INTO the Secret History, but I liked it a lot. It's about people.

My husband is 'making' me read Pillars of The Earth right now. That book is about fighting over stones...but I suppose it's a classic

jarbaby

Chance the Gardener
08-29-2001, 10:38 AM
Originally posted by KarlGauss

Fiction: Being There by Jerzy Kosinski. Read it!



Heh... I don't know how I forgot to put this one on my list.

Actually, I don't read...

Legomancer
08-29-2001, 10:49 AM
Fermat's Enigma by Simon Singh. It's about the questo to prove Fermat's Last Theorem. Good even if you don't like math - especially if you don't like math, in fact, since it's very accessible and a nice guide to how beautiful math can be.

The Floating Opera by John Barth.

Steve Wright
08-29-2001, 11:01 AM
First ones that popped into my head:

John Gardner's Nickel Mountain (this is not the spy-story John Gardner, this is the other one - the one who persuaded me that "American literature" wasn't an oxymoron after all.)

Umberto Eco, The Name of the Rose.

Lawrence Durrell's Alexandria Quartet.

And his brother Gerald's My Family and Other Animals.

bobkitty
08-29-2001, 11:07 AM
[guilty pleasure voice]
The Saint-Germain books, by Chelsea Quinn Yarbro
[/guilty pleasure voice]

I *really* like the Guy Gavriel Kay books.. his Tapestry series is fantastic.

A Case of Need, by Michael Crichton (under his pseudonym Jeffrey Hudson) and Travels by M.C.

I second 1984 and Brave New World, and raise you Animal Farm.

Mists of Avalon (Marion Zimmer Bradley) is always a perrenial favorite at the Bobkitty House, as is the prequel The Forest House.

I've recently ordered new copies of Maus and Maus II (Art Speigelman) and am eagerly looking forward to re-reading them.

I'm sure there are more, but I'm away from my seven overflowing bookcases at the moment. Perhaps I'll post more later. :)

-BK

bobkitty
08-29-2001, 11:11 AM
Originally posted by Steve Wright
Umberto Eco, The Name of the Rose.

DAMMIT!!! There's one now!!! And Foucault's Pendulum.

Maeglin
08-29-2001, 11:25 AM
Well, I'm not a big literary genius so I'm not used to knowing what's good and what isn't. It did take a while for me to get INTO the Secret History, but I liked it a lot. It's about people.

My husband is 'making' me read Pillars of The Earth right now. That book is about fighting over stones...but I suppose it's a classic.

Malarky. :D You have no problem whatsover forming and justifying your opinions. Shit, I'm no literary genius but I am as judgmental as one ought to be.

Besides Tartt's wasted erudition, I just didn't find the people compelling. Or even remotely real. To me the SH seemed like a pretentious comic book. Then again, I would know all about stuff like that. ;)

I have read Pillars of the Earth. A pretty good story, but also nothing exactly to write home about. Ken Follett's a decent storyteller, but as far as I am concerned, there ain't much redeeming about his work.

MR

lieu
08-29-2001, 12:04 PM
All the Pretty Horses - I doubt the movie's worth a damn but the book was great.
Adventures of a Bystander - Peter F. Drucker
The Immense Journey - Loren Eisley

Many Crows
08-29-2001, 12:19 PM
Anything by Orson Scott Card
Almost anything be John Steinbeck

"Whoever heard of a horse in the house" by Jacqueline Tresl, yup, exactly what it sounnds like, they take in a sick foal and it never makes it back to the barn.

I'm printing this list and I'm going to start reading them all.

Lucifer12
08-29-2001, 02:44 PM
Originally posted by Steve Wright
First ones that popped into my head:

John Gardner's Nickel Mountain (this is not the spy-story John Gardner, this is the other one - the one who persuaded me that "American literature" wasn't an oxymoron after all.)
/i].

Good call! I'm a big John Gardner fan - Freddy's Book should have gone into my OP. I've been meaning to re-read Nickel Mountain for some time now, but I still want to read someone I haven't read before...

A friend recomended Carter Beats The Devil by Glen David Gold. Anyone read it?

tiny ham
08-29-2001, 02:55 PM
Originally posted by Maeglin
Besides Tartt's wasted erudition, I just didn't find the people compelling. Or even remotely real. To me the SH seemed like a pretentious comic book. Then again, I would know all about stuff like that. ;)



Well, I think I may have liked the people because they were so unreal. I mean, they became more and more insane and twisted as the book went on,( you quitter :) ) and the surreality was what grabbed me.

Pillars of the Earth, though. Man. You've got to really really dig learning how to build a church to enjoy that book. And not enough sex for my tastes :D

jarbaby

Miss Pippi
08-29-2001, 08:45 PM
Tobacco Road by Erskine Caldwell

Anthem by Ayn Rand

I read those two once a year and am glad for where I live and for what I have.

Soup
08-29-2001, 09:04 PM
Summer of '49 David Halberstam
Into Thin Air Jon Krakauer
Lonesome Dove Larry McMurtry
The Godfather Mario Puzo
A Princess of Mars Edgar Rice Burroughs

CalMeacham
08-29-2001, 09:15 PM
How can you people not like Pillars of the Earth? Great book! What sort of things rally go into the building of a medieval cahedral. Note that hey don't even start building until more than halfway into the book. Heck, I recommend it.

In the same vein, I recommend The Bronze God of Rhodes by L. Sprague deCamp. If you can find it, that is. All the good books seem to go out of print. It's about the building of the Colossus of Rhodes, told in detail by an engineer and classcist and historical novelist (not to mention science fiction and fantasy author of the highest order). as in PotE, the first half of the book sets up the historical situation.

plankter
08-29-2001, 09:30 PM
The best story I ever read is Bridge Of Birds by Barry Hughart.

Miss Creant
08-29-2001, 09:46 PM
Anything by Cecil Adams
all of the stories by Rue De Day, story guy

All the James Herriot books. If you love animals this is required reading

Confederacy of Dunces

All David Sedaris

An Incomplete Education-everything you should have learned in school and didn't or proptly forgot immediatly after taking the test. Written by two Esquire editors, very funny
and written so that you WANT to read it.

To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

Gone With The Wind Margret Mitchell-I love this book
I think I took it out of the library at least 13 times in jr. high alone. I agree with none of it, but it was like a big window opening and I could see what the other side was thinking. I hope that makes sense.

I'm sure tons more to follow

Miss Creant
08-29-2001, 09:53 PM
and for those of you thinking about either Moby Dick or David Sedaris here (http://www.esquire.com/humor/sedaris/articles/000301_mds_moby01.html) is a nice combination of the two

oliversarmy
08-29-2001, 10:02 PM
I don't know why, but the first book to pop into my head when I saw the OP was "The Cuckoo's Egg" by Clifford Stoll.

A very interesting read.

Catamount
08-29-2001, 10:05 PM
Emily of New Moon and the sequels Emily Climbs, and (I just forgot the name of the third one) by L. M. Montgomery. Just as good, if not better, than the Anne of Green Gables series.

White Noise by Don Delillo. Intriguing look at modern society.

Linden Hills by Gloria Naylor. Dante's Inferno in an affluent black community.

Tarzan of the Apes by Edgar Rice Burroughs. Much, much better than any of the movies.

A brief query: Am I the only one in the world who absolutely loathed The Catcher in the Rye? I just can't stand that whiney Holden Caulfield, yet everyone I've ever talked to loves him.

scotth
08-30-2001, 02:45 AM
Although this series is fantasy, really they are books of incredible self sacrifice. Truly unbelievable. Thomas Covenent Series by Stephen R. Donaldson

This one is by Dean Koontz, normally known for his horror novels, but this one is quite a bit different than the rest. Strangers

A classic in the truest sense, Sidhartha by Hermann Hesse

Ringworld by Larry Niven (actually there are plenty of must reads by him, and Ender's Game by Orson Scott Card have been mention a few times... Take these serious, I nominate them again.

Carl Sagan's Demon Haunted World should be made required reading to graduate from anything greater than the fourth grade.

And two toughies.... I am sure to get flamed for this phrasing, however, it gets the point across. On the next two books, people I have aquainted with them either didn't have the mind or the background to follow them, or they were among the most amazing books they had been exposed to. There seemed to be nothing in between. Really though, if the person didn't report LOVING them, they reported not understanding them.

Robert M Persig's Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance to start.

And second would be Einstein's Bridge by John Cramer. This book truly requires a STRONG science background to get the most from it. This is the science fiction that science fiction authors should be reading. Astounding is not a strong enough word. Actually, if you have read this book, I would love to hear from you... Can't be that many of us.

G. Nome
08-30-2001, 06:46 AM
How Proust Can Change Your Life - Alain De Botton
The Consolations of Philosophy - Alain De Botton
The Gormenghast Trilogy - Mervyn Peake
The Doubters Companion - John Ralston Saul

tiny ham
08-30-2001, 10:04 AM
Originally posted by CalMeacham
How can you people not like Pillars of the Earth? Great book! What sort of things rally go into the building of a medieval cahedral. Note that hey don't even start building until more than halfway into the book.


No kidding. first we have to read about how to find true north to position the cathedral, how and where we get the stone from, where everyone lives in relation to the stone, how churches are designed, how tools are used, how to get money for the church.... :)

Don't worry, I'll finish it someday. But it feels more like a history lesson than an entertaining lay-in-the-bathtub-and-read book.

For a quick, plane-trip book, I'd like offer Mall by Eric Bogosian. Super short, quick moving. It's like reading an action movie.

jarbaby

Spoonbender
08-30-2001, 10:19 AM
Some of these have already been mentioned:

J.D. Salinger, The Catcher in the Rye
Jay McInerney, Bright Lights, Big City
Chuck Palahniuk, Fight Club
Carl Sagan, The Demon-Haunted World

lieu
08-30-2001, 10:31 AM
History of Western Philosophy
Bertram Russell

I'm certainly not an athiest but I did feel like I was following the development of religion as man's philosophical complexity was evolving.

Stoid
08-30-2001, 03:08 PM
Originally posted by jarbabyj
A Prayer For Owen Meany by John Irving should be read by everyone alive.


You and I are in complete agreement on this. Definitely one of my top 5 of all time, might be #1.

Others that spring to mind:

Lonesome Dove
The Power of One (The description was totally uninteresting, but friend demanded I read it. LOVED it, cried like a baby)
Stranger in a Strange Land
Cold Mountain (hard to get into, but once I did I was in love)
Memoirs of a Geisha

Kalashnikov
08-30-2001, 11:03 PM
Unintended Consequences by John Ross

This is the book the government doesn't want you to read. People told Ross that he should publish it under a pseudonym, but he didn't. Sure enough, the feds are harassing him and his ex-wife (who is on good terms with him, fortunately!) They also threatened small businesses who sold it, to the point where they stopped doing so.

However, the large bookstores like Amazon and Barnes and Noble still carry it.

At one point Ross was saying he was working on a sequel, but now he says he's not, "for health reasons". Hmmm.

It is a long book that goes into a lot of detail about the characters' backgrounds before the exciting part starts. If you get bored during some of the earlier parts, stick with it. Believe me, the second half is worth it.

schplebordnik
08-31-2001, 12:20 AM
The Master & Margarita: Mikhail Bulgakov
The Life & Opinions of Tritram Shandy, Gentleman: Laurence Sterne
Gargantua & Pantagruel: Francois Rabelais
Moby Dick: Herman Melville

These are mostly great, but have some flat/not so great parts:

Huckleberry Finn, Mark Twain
Fathers & Sons: Ivan Turgenev
The Decameron: Bocaccio

Oh, and props to the poster who referenced The Manuscript Found at Saragossa: Jan Potocki. You keep peeling the onion, and get more and more oddball connections....

woodstockbirdybird
08-31-2001, 01:02 AM
Originally posted by G. Nome
How Proust Can Change Your Life - Alain De Botton
The Consolations of Philosophy - Alain De Botton

I'll second these. Both very rewarding, and not at all written in the elitist academic style that characterizes most philosophical treatments.

My picks:
We wish To Inform You That Tomorrow We Will Be Killed With Our Families: Stories from Rwanda, by Philip Gourevitch. He takes you there while managing to be neither sanctimonious nor dry and still moving and readable. No matter what you think, you won't be able to put it down.

Our Band Could Be Your Life: Scenes from the American indie underground 1981-1991 by Michael Azerrad. Even if the music isn't your cup of tea, it's fascinating to see how these marginalized bands with no major financial backing created a subculture thats effects are still being felt today. Then you can watch their inevitable implosions.

Lipstick Traces: A secret history of the 20th century by Greil Marcus. Starts with the Sex Pistols, then goes on to cover underground art and philosophical movements throughout the past century (and beyond). Will change the way you think about the world. Warning: kinda pedantic.

The Elegant Universe by Brian Greene. An excellent introduction to physics and the latest thoughts in superstring theory written for the layman.

For fiction, I'd recommend Geek Love by Katherine Dunn. About a family of circus sideshow freaks. Haven't read it in about ten years, but it was pretty dark and made an impression.
Last but not least:
Pop. 1280 by Jim Thompson. So dark it goes beyond noir fiction. Like Camus's "The Stranger" without the angst and rationalizations. Read it.

Spooky
08-31-2001, 01:32 AM
Please don't flame me!!!

Desert island reading material: The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings.

CalMeacham
08-31-2001, 08:05 AM
quote:
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Originally posted by CalMeacham
How can you people not like Pillars of the Earth? Great book! What sort of things rally go into the building of a medieval cahedral. Note that hey don't even start building until more than halfway into the book.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


No kidding. first we have to read about how to find true north to position the cathedral, how and where we get the stone from, where everyone lives in relation to the stone, how churches are designed, how tools are used, how to get money for the church....

Don't worry, I'll finish it someday. But it feels more like a history lesson than an entertaining lay-in-the-bathtub-and-read book.



This might be the differece between us -- I did find this a great lay-in-the-bathtub-and-read book. But then again, I'm an engineer, so I like those sorts of things.

To anyone who'd belittle that as a nuts-and-bolts engineering mindset, I direct your attention to Herman Melville's Moby Dick, already mentioned in this thread and an acknowledged work of Literature. The boo is chock-full of detailed discussions and descriptions of 19th century whaling techniques, technology, and whale biology. Read it, if you haven't already. Melville had been a whaler, and his love of the details and tools of his former trade are obvious in his descriptions and in the way he lingers on such "technology". It's shows his passion for the subject and gives the book its texture. It must freak out the "literary" types who read the book for the first time hoping to find mainly passages devoted to tthe symbolism of a White Whale, with all its ambiguities and metaphors, then have to wade through pages of Melville discoursing on isinglass.

I loved Moby Dick, and I love The Pillars of the Earth, and to me the technical details are a big part of it. Heck, a bookm about the raising of a carthedral would be amiss not to devote large portions to the EXistential Pleasures of Engineering (to steal Samuel C. Florman's title).

Rayne Man
08-31-2001, 05:01 PM
For those who like spy stories try "The Riddle of the Sands" by Erskine Childers. Written in 1903 this is considered to be the first spy novel. It is about two British men sailing round the coast of Germany and discovering that the Germans are making plans for warfare.The book helped to awaken Britain about the build-up of German sea power. I have just read the book and was surprised how "modern" the narrative is. It flows very well and does not have the stilted language I was expecting of books of that age.

pesch
08-31-2001, 10:22 PM
If you're a "Lord of the Rings" fan, you may appreciate "Bored of the Rings," by The Harvard Lampoon. The latest version is a Penguin paperback for about $13, which for about 173 pages is a rip-off, but if you can find it used, definitly consider it.

Here's a sample:

"'Goodbye, Dildo,' Frito said, stifling a sob. 'I wish you were coming with us.'

'Ah, yes. But I'm too old for that sort of thing now,' said the old boggie, feigning a state of total quadriplegia. 'Anyway, I have a few small gifts for you,' and he produced a lumpy parcel, which Frito opened somewhat unenthusiastically in view of Dildo's previous going-away present [the ring]. But the package only contained a short, Revereware sword, a bulletproof vest full of moth holes, and several well-thumbed novellas with titles like Elf Lust and Goblin Girl..."

TVeblen
09-01-2001, 06:56 AM
Moderator's note:

Since Cafe Society is now open for business I'm moving this thread over there.

TVeb

Ukulele Ike
09-01-2001, 09:24 AM
Originally posted by David Cronan
For those who like spy stories try "The Riddle of the Sands" by Erskine Childers.



Fascinating fact: Childers, an outspoken Irish Nationalist, ran rifles to the IRA on his private yacht (paid for by the royalties from Riddle of the Sands) in 1915. He was exectuted by firing squad a few years later.

DynoSaur
09-01-2001, 11:40 AM
Well, I'll second the Discworld novels by Terry Pratchett.

How the Mind Works, by Stephen Pinker...a great exploration of exactly that.

Dead Men do Tell Tales, by William R. Maples and Michael Browning. A book about forensic pathology. Pretty damned cool.

Anything by Neil Gaiman, (American Gods, Smoke and Mirrors, Stardust, and the Sandman series of comic books)

And the book I've just finished reading - The Golden Compass by Phillip Pullman. Just...wow. A fantasyish sort of story set in a near-Earth type place. Supposedly, it's geared towards a younger audience, but whatever. It's just a great book. I literally can't wait to go pick up the sequels...

TV time
09-01-2001, 12:09 PM
Originally posted by Spooky


Desert island reading material: The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings.

In fact I read those two and many others mentioned here while on a tiny little island in the middle of the Western Pacific. No flame here.

I would also recomend:

The Maltese Falcon by Dashill Hammett

The Monkey Wrench Gang by Edward Abby

Broadway Stories by Damon Runyon

Timberline by Gene Fowler

Child of the Century (the first three quarters at least)- by Ben Hecht.

TV

hardygrrl
09-01-2001, 12:25 PM
Great thread :)

First off, jarbaby, you took three of mine.

I'm listing the books I always go back to and have read mulitple times.

London Fields, Money, and Experience by Martin Amis. I love his work. He's better known in the UK than he is here. Damn shame that Grisham can rule the best seller list and very few people have read Amis. His work is thought provoking, funny and horrifying, all at once. London Fields is his best fiction work, IMHO and Experience, his autobiography, made me laugh and cry.

Anything by David Sedaris or Joe Queenen for a laugh.


The Robber Bride, Cat's Eye, Lady Oracle or the Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood

Beloved by Toni Morrison

The Divine Comedy by Dante

Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert

A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens

A Prayer For Owen Meany, Widow For One Year, Son of The Circus and the World According to Garp by John Irving

Eutychus
09-01-2001, 12:34 PM
Ancient Lights by Davis Grubb.

I keep recommedning this (now out-of-print) book but so far no one has taken me up on it. Trust me ... find it, read it ... you will not be sorry.

Michael Ellis
09-01-2001, 08:23 PM
Originally posted by scotth
A classic in the truest sense, Sidhartha by Hermann Hesse

Ugh...I couldn't stand that book my freshman year of high school. Luckily I started reading Catch-22 after someone suggested it to me as a way to wash out my "literary palette"*. I ended up reading it over and over for the next year.

I couldn't stomach the selections chosen from Walden, either.

As for recomemdations, I suggest Angela's Ashes and 'Tis by Frank McCourt. They really help put the attitudes of the upper-class idiots surrounding me at my High School in perspective. In other words, I discovered how shallow and whiny they were for such well off people. I think I knew most of this already, but I just hadn't admitted it yet.




* Note to Fenris, et al: I put this in quotations because I found it a horribly snooty term but could think of none better. Suggestions are welcome.

Dangerosa
09-01-2001, 10:12 PM
A.S. Byatt: Possession

Margaret Atwood: Handmaid's Tale and Robber Bride

Harper Lee: To Kill a Mockingbird

John Irving: Prayer for Owen Meany and Cider House Rules

Jane Austen: Pride and Prejudice

Gozu Tashoya
09-02-2001, 09:39 PM
I second the vote for anything by Neil Gaiman, especially Neverwhere, which I loved.

xanakis
09-02-2001, 10:06 PM
"The Mind's I" by Douglas Hofstadter and Daniel C. Dennett - discusses the nature of consciousness in laymans terms

"The Newtonian Casino" by Thomas A. Bass - a group of physics geeks and assorted other scientists figure out a way to predict where the ball will come to rest on a roulette wheel using Chaos Theory, then head on up to Nevada to try it out. True story.

Anything by Agatha Christie or any of Sir Arthur Conan-Doyle's Sherlock Holmes stories.

You all have to read Maupassant's short stories urgently. If you haven't read them yet, start today. If you have read them, read them again.

"Hunger" by Knut Hamsun

And, of course, my favourite book of all time: "Lord of the Rings".

G. Nome
09-03-2001, 04:10 AM
Understanding the Present - Bryan Appleyard
Modern Manners - P.J. O'Rourke
The Hare and the Tortoise - David Barash

DMC
09-03-2001, 05:47 AM
Another very strong vote for A Confederacy of Dunces. I've gone through seven copies of the paperback due to the number of times it's been borrowed. Nobody touches my hardcover version of it.

I also talk most of my friends into reading The Education of Little Tree, by Forrest (Asa) Carter. Note for those familiar with it: yes, I know about the controversy, but I still like the book very much

The rest of my choices have been listed numerous times, so I'll save the bandwidth.

tiny ham
09-03-2001, 10:01 AM
Originally posted by Dangerosa
A.S. Byatt: Possession

Margaret Atwood: Handmaid's Tale and Robber Bride



Sweet Jesus, Dangerosa, you're a better person than me. 100 pages into Possession and I impaled the book on a stake, doused it in gasoline and set it on fire. I was actually on the floor rocking myself into a stupor at how difficult it is to get through that book.

And margaret Atwood, what can I say? If I could hate her any more, she'd be David Mamet :D

Those books take time and patience. Kudos.

jarbaby

Why A Duck
09-03-2001, 10:19 AM
More grist for the mill.

Try Gravity's Rainbow by Thomas Pynchon. A very difficult book. It took me three tries to get through it, but ultimately worth it.

Reay Tannahill has two books Food in History/Sex in History that are a great read for those that like history from a different perspective.

In a similar vein, Diane Ackerman's Natural History of the Senses puts human sensory development in the spotlight.

I'll add another vote for Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance. I came across it at just the right point in my life and it affected me deeply.

Stardust by Neil Gaiman is a wonderful fairy tale. Use a little parental editing on a couple of inexplicably explicit sex scenes and you've also got a great story to read to your kids.

Fathers - A Celebration by J. Gerard Smith. Okay, this is really smarmy, but I loved this book. It is full of pictures of fathers and their children accompanied by a short piece written by the fathers. Yes, it's sentimental, but the pictures are really remarkable.

Popup
09-03-2001, 11:03 AM
Originally posted by xanakis
"The Mind's I" by Douglas Hofstadter and Daniel C. Dennett - discusses the nature of consciousness in laymans terms

Very good book. And if you liked that, you'll love The User Illusion : Cutting Consciousness Down to Size, by Tor Nørretranders. Similar, but different.

Owen Meany has already been mentioned several times. If you like Irvings books, try Robertson Davies. Similar narrative style and improbable story. Start with The Cornish trilogy or the Debtford trilogy.

G. Nome
09-03-2001, 09:12 PM
Amusing Ourselves to Death - Neil Postman
In the Name of Love - Jill Tweedie
Woman: An Intimate Geography - Natalie Angier
The Gutenberg Elegies - Sven Birkets
The Death of Forever - Darryl Reanney
Greetings Carbon-based Bipeds - Arthur C. Clarke
The 100 Most Influential Books Ever

The End.

Knighted Vorpal Sword
09-05-2001, 01:25 PM
Try John Grisham's latest book, The Painted House. This is unlike any of his other books - it has nothing to do with courtrooms, jail, or executions. I enjoyed it so much I couldn't put it down, and read the whole thing at one time.

Then, of course, there's my all time favorite, The Annotated Alice. If you haven't read Alice in Wonderland since you were a kid, read this book.

Phobos
09-05-2001, 04:56 PM
I'm glad someone mentioned Carl Sagan's Demon-Haunted World. Although not his best writing, it's an excellent guide to critical thinking. I'd also recommend Sagan's Pale Blue Dot which is the sequel to Cosmos (of course, Cosmos is best appreciated in video form). His fiction Contact is well worth it too...better than the movie.

Originally posted by oliversarmy
I don't know why, but the first book to pop into my head when I saw the OP was "The Cuckoo's Egg" by Clifford Stoll.

A very interesting read.

Did the book-on-tape for this one. It was read by the author who did a good job giving the story a personal touch.

Ferrous
09-06-2001, 06:09 PM
The Mars Trilogy (Red Mars,Green Mars,Blue Mars) by Kim Stanley Robinson is fantastic! Well, the first two are; the third drags just a bit in the middle, but you'll want to read it after the first two.

Also, it's been said several times, but will chime in again: anything by Orson Scott Card, especially Ender's Game.

Surely You're Joking, Mr. Feynman by Richard Feynman

Phobos
11-16-2001, 10:42 AM
sorry to revive an old thread, but this didn't fit into the ongoing book topics

Just wanted to recommend one of my favorites...

Soul of the Night (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1886913110/qid=1005924646/sr=1-8/ref=sr_1_15_8/002-5790156-0276068) by Chet Reymo. Professor of astronomy. Naturalist. Skeptic with a spiritual eye. Excellent author. His writings (several books and weekly articles in the Boston Globe) show how deep a scientific appreciation of the universe can be.

whatami
11-16-2001, 12:56 PM
Well, I'm glad to see that someone mentioned the Mars trilogy, that was great.

I'd like to thank everyone for their great suggestions, I'll be hitting B&N tonight.

Here are some of my favorites....

Michael Crichtons books..

If you're a WWII history buff, The Rise and Fall of the Third Riech

I really like most of the books by ...what is his name...

oh yeah James Michner The Source

This may sound strange, even though I'm an atheist, I read The Bible. There are some good stories and it's great to help understand Christianity a little bit more.

Have a great day.

p.s.
oh yeah, read the Harry Potter books too!

jharding
11-16-2001, 02:55 PM
Missed this thread the first time around, so I'll just chime in late with my selection and a few comments.

Zen and The Art of Motorcycle Maintenance Hated it--think Holden Caulfield all grown up with an equally whinny and morose son.

The Monkeywrench Gang by Edward Abby: Good call and a thumbs up for just about anything by Abby.

My own choice for a must read is A Sand County Almanac by Aldo Leopold. It's billed as a nature book, but it's much more than that. Beautiful, lyrical, tragic, thought-provoking, and ultimately humbling.

Fiddle Peghead
11-16-2001, 03:23 PM
Originally posted by Ukulele Ike
[QUOTE]

If you MUST read Ellroy (and I don't recommend it. the man is a grossly egotistical self-publicist, not a serious novelist) ...




What does ego have to do with whether he's a good writer or not? And if I only read serious novelists, I wouldn't have enjoyed all those Robert Ludlum novels growing up.

I'd like to recommend "The First World War" by John Keegan. It is a facinating and elegant history of WWI.

The_Peyote_Coyote
11-16-2001, 04:01 PM
Crime and Punishment -- Fyodor Dostoevetsky
The Bible
The Collected Poems of W.B. Yeats
Moby Dick -- Herman Melville
The Maltese Falcon -- Dashiell Hammett
anything by Peter S. Beagle
Invisible Man -- Ralph Ellison
Mythology -- Edith Hamilton
East of Eden -- John Steinbeck
A Tale of Two Cities -- Charles Dickens

velouria
11-16-2001, 11:16 PM
I have to suggest:

The Professor and the Madman

I can't remember who wrote it, and I'm too lazy to look it up. It made me buy the OED.

DarkWriter
11-17-2001, 12:38 AM
The Stand, by Stephen King.

Swan Song, by Robert R. McCammon

The Kent Family Chronicles, by John Jakes

And I Don't Want to Live this Life, by Deborah Spungeon (Nancy Spungeon's mother; Nancy was the girl murdered by Sid Vicious.)

Those are just a very few I recommend. I could go on for days. :)

Sheri

Playdeaux
11-17-2001, 03:11 AM
In addition to many already listed:

The God of Small Things, Arundhati Roy

Postcards, E. Annie Proulx

Stones From the River, Ursula Hegi

The Kitchen God's Wife, Amy Tan

Chesapeake, James Michener

The Source, James Michener

Waiting to Exhale, Terry McMillan

Smila's Sense of Snow, Peter Hoeg

Anything by Ann Tyler (The Accidental Tourist, Breathing Lessons)

Kyla
11-17-2001, 03:56 AM
Many good books have been recommended. I won't repeat them except to say that Catch-22 is my most favorite book of all time.

My two favorite new books (both still available only in hardcover) are Fast Food Nation by Eric Schlosser and The Noonday Demon by Andrew Solomon. The latter was just awarded the National Book Award for non-fiction, so it's not just me. Read these books!

Green Bean
11-17-2001, 10:34 AM
Fiction:
The Phantom Tollboth by Norton Juster
Time and Again by Jack Finney

Non-Fiction:
Geography of Nowhere by James Howard Kunstler
The Gift of Fear by Gavin DeBecker

Aro
04-16-2002, 11:10 AM
Catcher in the Rye was a terrible book, firmly agree. But...

Albert Camus - The Stranger/Outsider
Jack Kerouac - On the Road
Robert Persig - Zen & the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance
John Steinbeck - Grapes of Wrath
Aldous Huxley - Brave New World
William Burroughs - Naked Lunch
Jostein Gaarder - Sophies World
Charles Darwin - Voyage on the Beagle
Douglas Hofstadter - Godel, Escher, Bach...Eternal Golden Braid
Victor Papanek - Green Imperative
Bryan Appleyard - all
Jung Chang - Wild Swans
Harper Lee - To kill a mockingbird
Keri Hulme - The Bone People
Friedrich Nietzsche - all
Gabriel Garcia Marquez -all
Milan Kundera - Unbearable lightness of being
Brett Easton Ellis - American Psycho
Irving Welsh - Trainspotting
All these books moved me in some strong emotive way, whether with love, hate, anger, depression etc..

And many, many more. How do you define a favourite?


BTW, you can get free books on-line here for those who don't know: www.promo.net/pg

Love Rhombus
04-16-2002, 02:29 PM
I'm astounded that no one has mentioned Watership Down. I loved it and reread it often.

E.R. Chamberlin's The Bad Popes. Some of the interesting parts of the history of the Papancy.

Thanks everybody, I have a birthday coming up and this thread has filled up my wish list nicely! (though a Playstation 2 would be good too. :-)

Dreaming of Maria Callas
04-16-2002, 04:18 PM
Originally posted by pugluvr
If you like sci-fi, you've probably already read these titles. I cite them because like "Mona Lisa Overdrive", they are both sci-fi and hard-boiled gumshoe detective fiction:

"The Long Arm of Gil Hamilton" by Larry Niven
"Ringworld" by Larry Niven

"The Long Arm of Gil Hamilton" has been out of print from some time. The original three Gil the Arm stories have been collected into FLATLANDER, which also include two of Niven's latest pieces, which suck just as bad as most of his post-1980 Known Space stuff (every try making it through Niven's THE RINGWORLD THRONE? Well, it's "Niven's" if he actually wrote it. It was possibly ghostwritten)

UnuMondo

shagadelicmysteryman
04-16-2002, 06:30 PM
Well I guess it all depends on which genre you belong to, but I throw out a list for everybody.

"Wise Blood" by Flannery O'Connor. That's good for a nice blasphemous laugh.

"Slaughter House Five" by Kurt Vonnegut. A nice little riddle for the average man/woman's mind.

Hearts in Atlantis by Stephen King.

Any Tom Clancy novel, as always. Also, don't hesitate to pick up an Ernest Hemingway book if you see it at the library. I've read about three or four of them, and I haven't been disappointed yet.

And another note, look in any Literature book you can find or look on the internet for "A Shocking Accident". I don't recall the author's name, but it is a hilarious short story.

Love Rhombus
04-16-2002, 08:43 PM
I'd reccommend anything by Laurell Hamilton..good fantasy stuff

DaPearl
04-17-2002, 10:30 PM
On The Road by Jack Kerouac
The cross-country journey to end all road stories. A masterpiece.

Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas[u] by Hunter S. Thompson
I'm a huge fan Doctor Gonzo, and out of the stuff of his I've read, his drug riddled account of his savage journey to the heart of the American dream is his best.

[u]Hell's Angels by HUnter S. Thompson
Thompson's account and reportings of the year he spent with the Hell's Angels before getting the crap beaten out of him. Informative on the lives and habits of the Hell's Angels, but also about the press, attitudes in the class structure, society, and more.

The Stand by Stephen King
My favorite book of all time. Stephen King's masterpiece about the apocalypse is almost a satiracal study of society. King is exceptional in his descriptions and character developement. Hell, just about everything in this book is excellent.

1984 by George Orwell
Orwell's terriying vision. Should be required for everyone everywhere.

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
Perhaps the prototype for the road story, a great read and story that still is to this day.

Wiseguy by Nicholas Pillegi
The biography of Henry Hill (later made famous in GoodFellas). Great look into mob life.

Fight Club by Chuck Palahniuk
Chuck's first book is great, dark, funny satire on the world in which we live today. Made famous through the excellent film adaptation.

Survivor by Chuck Palahniuk
Although Fight Club is more widely known, mostly due to the movie, this is possibly better. This is Chuck's wild and dark look at religion, faith, and undercooked culinary delacacies. Very dark and perhaps not for the faint of heart.

Read Icculus
04-17-2002, 10:55 PM
Tuck Everlasting, by Natalie Babbit.

burundi
04-17-2002, 11:00 PM
I'm with Dangerosa and hardygrrl. The Robber Bride is one of my all-time favorite books, and I just finished Byatt's The Biographer's Tale. Now I want to go to Norway!

I also heartily recommend To Kill a Mockingbird. It's surprising how much fun it is when you're not reading it for school.

For fun non-fiction, I really like Antonia Fraser's histories, especially The Wives of Henry the Eighth. It's a fascinating read.

I have to confess that I really don't get John Irving. I read A Prayer for Owen Meany and started Ciderhouse Rules. I think he's okay, but I'm not sure why he's so beloved. My main impression is from the one and a half books that I read was that he was extremely creeped out by women and sex.

KidCharlemagne
04-27-2002, 01:19 PM
Fiction : "The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Klay" - Michael Chabon

Nonfiction:
"The Selfish Gene" -Richard Dawkins

"The Reflexive Universe" - the guy that invented the bell helicopter- Arthure something. Best nonfiction book ever written

"Conciousness Explained"- and anything else by Daniel Dennett

"Denial of Death" - Ernest Becker

ITR champion
04-27-2002, 04:45 PM
If you haven’t read Catch-22 yet, you’re missing one of the great pleasures of life.

The same is also true for The Grapes of Wrath.

Hyperion, by Dan Simmons, is the best science fiction book of recent years. If you read it, you’ll probably want to also read the sequel, called The Fall of Hyperion.

Right now, I’m working on Nightfall, by Isaac Asimov, which is also a very original work of science fiction.