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theretsof
10-26-2001, 06:40 AM
Seriously, I don't know.

My friend from Glasgow swears she's Glaswegian, which I can buy, but Edinburgh?

Note, I'm not asking what someone fron Edinburgh calls someone from Glasgow :)

Izzardesque
10-26-2001, 06:50 AM
I think they would be a Edinburgher.... don't really know tho.

jinty
10-26-2001, 06:52 AM
Yup, agree with Izzardesque.

pulykamell
10-26-2001, 06:54 AM
I've always heard Edinburgher, FWIW.

Crusoe
10-26-2001, 06:55 AM
I lived there for four years and I honestly cannot remember. Edinburgher sounds about right, though.

theretsof
10-26-2001, 06:57 AM
not in Dictionary.com, but Glaswegian is....

Glas·we·gian (gls-wjn, glz-)
adj.
Of or relating to Glasgow, Scotland.
n.
A native or resident of Glasgow, Scotland.

Niobium Knight
10-26-2001, 07:26 AM
i'm from Edinburgh and nobody says Edinburgher. trust me. there isnt a word for us.

Izzardesque
10-26-2001, 07:30 AM
I find it quite funny that someone from Hamburg IS called a Hamburger :)

The reason I said it would be Edinburgher is because a burgher is a resident of a burgh or borough. So technically, I think I am correct but no-one to my knowledge uses it

Steve Wright
10-26-2001, 07:43 AM
Like Crusoe, I spent four years in Edinburgh, and don't have a clue what the answer is.

Hmmm. Is there some Latinate term which exists, but is never used? You know, like Geordies are technically "Novocastrians"?

APB
10-26-2001, 07:45 AM
I tend to agree with Niobium Knight. Given the soft Scottish pronunciation of the 'burgh' bit in 'Edinburgh', 'Edinburgher' would be particularly awkward to say - it would almost have to be pronounced as Edinbur-er-er. None of the options seem as easy or as obvious as 'someone from Edinburgh'.

Qis
10-26-2001, 08:15 AM
know people from Edenburgh, they call themselves Edenburgers. Maybe they're just pulling my leg.

If, by some miracle, that is wronf, and there is no real name for people from Edenburgh( doubtfull) i say you adopt Edenburgher.

-Qis

Futile Gesture
10-26-2001, 09:08 AM
Edinburgher, pronounced Edinbruh-her.

It doesn't get used much, because it's such an ugly word. Which is ok, as no-one has much worth saying about people from Edinburgh. :)

pulykamell
10-26-2001, 09:26 AM
When I worked in Port Appin, Scotland, (west coast, between Oban and Ft. William), I asked the question to some of the Scottish employees, and they did tell me "Edinburgher." I had not thought of asking that question during my stay in Edinburgh, however, so I don't know what they call themselves there.

Floater
10-26-2001, 10:10 AM
I once had the occasion to call a friend of mine originally from Belfast "a wanker" (he had said something stupid). A Glaswegian sitting nearby then asked me: "Why do you call him a wanker? He's not from the East coast of Scotland" :rolleyes:

Rodd Hill
10-26-2001, 10:47 AM
A "Pan-Loafer?"
An "Auld Reekian?"

jinty
10-26-2001, 11:51 AM
Originally posted by Rodd Hill
A "Pan-Loafer?"
An "Auld Reekian?"

LOL. A "you'll-have-had-your-tea-er".

Things I (a Glaswegian) have been called by one particularly obnoxious Edinburgher: soap-dodger; work-shy; scrounger.

Sigh...when there are only two humans left in the universe, they'll no doubt think up nasty and pointless names for each other.

Floater
10-27-2001, 05:25 AM
I ran into my Glaswegian friend, mentioned above, yesterday and asked him (my question might have been slighly leading) what he would call someone from Edinburgh and he promptly answered eedjit.

Niobium Knight
10-27-2001, 06:16 AM
us in Edinburgh call Glaswegians "weegie cunts"

my dad tells me it is Edinburger but it gets used so little it's not worth bothering about.

ali0r
10-27-2001, 06:59 AM
It would seem to me that Rodd Hill would be the one with an accurate answer... 'An "Auld Reekian?"'...coming from Edinburgh myself and being a *partial* football (soccer) fan...the term "Auld Reekian" is one that can be found in the song of one of the local football teams, Hearts. Ummm, thats about all I Know :)...

Niobium Knight
10-27-2001, 11:41 PM
"and Auld Reekie supports them with pride"

sorry but Auld Reekie is Edinburgh, not the people in Edinburgh and i have NEVER heard anyone called an Auld Reekien.

it's Edinburger, trust me.

jinty
10-28-2001, 12:59 PM
Originally posted by Niobium Knight
us in Edinburgh call Glaswegians "weegie cunts"


And why exactly did you feel obliged to share this particular Begbie-esque witticism with us? It makes you sound really humourless.

don willard
10-28-2001, 01:41 PM
I feel that if a Glasgowian is called a Glaswegian, then an Edinburghian would be called an Edinwegian. Now a further question, since that this one is settled, what is a person from Linlithgow called? A Linlithwegian? There are probably a lot of Scottish place names ending in gow; do they all go to weg? I think it is called suppletism in grammar when a completely different word is used for some grammatical effect, as in the irregularity of the forms of to be in all languages: am,is,are,was,were,be,been,being, and only the last three seem to have the same root. The others are suppletisms. Other examples include comparisons and superlatives of irregular adjectives, as in good, better, best instead of good, gooder, goodest as with high, higher, highest.

Niobium Knight
10-28-2001, 10:44 PM
Originally posted by jinty
Originally posted by Niobium Knight
us in Edinburgh call Glaswegians "weegie cunts"


And why exactly did you feel obliged to share this particular Begbie-esque witticism with us? It makes you sound really humourless.

why not? sorry i sound humourless, but it's true. :)

GuanoLad
10-29-2001, 02:26 AM
"Dunedin-ites"

Niobium Knight
10-29-2001, 02:46 AM
my favourite is Skegness - Skegs :)

jinty
10-29-2001, 04:05 AM
Originally posted by Niobium Knight
Originally posted by jinty
Originally posted by Niobium Knight
us in Edinburgh call Glaswegians "weegie cunts"


And why exactly did you feel obliged to share this particular Begbie-esque witticism with us? It makes you sound really humourless.

why not? sorry i sound humourless, but it's true. :)

And now your disingenuousness is really starting to annoy me. The OP said "Note, I'm not asking what someone fron Edinburgh calls someone from Glasgow", so why, in GQ (which is for factual questions), did you do exactly the opposite, except to drop in this gratuitous insult?

Futile Gesture
10-29-2001, 04:36 AM
Originally posted by jinty
[QUOTE]so why, in GQ (which is for factual questions), did you do exactly the opposite, except to drop in this gratuitous insult?

Seconded. Could we close this thread please? The question has been answered.

don willard
10-29-2001, 06:39 PM
Wait, I still don't have a reply on whether those from Linlithgow are called Linlithwegians! Notice how those from Norway are called Norwegians, so I think we have something here about the suppletism of way to weg and gow to weg.
If you are from Sweden or Denmark you are just Swedish or Denmarkish whoops I mean Danish: ah! Here we have another oddity. This is mark goes to ish! Now are there any other ones where mark goes to ish? Of course so many things go to ish that it might be that nothing interesting would be revealed if we could think of other marks that go to ish....

Izzardesque
10-30-2001, 06:52 AM
I don't think there ARE 'people living in....' names for everyone. I live near Derby at the moment and there isn't a name for people from Derby.

That said, people from Swansea are called Jacks, which has absolutely nothing to do with the name.

So, actually, the overall answer, is probably that there isn't one

Niobium Knight
10-30-2001, 07:39 AM
some of you take this a bit seriously dont you? i gave my fair share or info in this thread. just cos i dropped in a little "OT" bit some of you get all upset :wally:

Johanna
10-30-2001, 09:52 PM
Ooh! Place name insults! Can I play?

How about:
Baltimoron
Chicagorilla

jinty
10-31-2001, 04:33 AM
Originally posted by Niobium Knight
some of you take this a bit seriously dont you? i gave my fair share or info in this thread.

You don't give up, do you? This is just as disingenuous as your last post. How would you feel if someone called you a "cunt"? IMHO there isn't a worse linguistic insult in the English language. Maybe you know different...oh no wait a minute, if you do, don't bother to enlighten me.

Originally posted by Niobium Knight
just cos i dropped in a little "OT" bit some of you get all upset :wally:

I think GQ is the wrong forum for you. Why don't you try The Pit or MPSIMS instead? (Oh, I wish there was a "Troll!" smiley as well as a "Putz!" one)

ruadh
10-31-2001, 05:07 AM
Now now kids. Look at the post which immediately preceded that infamous one by Niobium - s/he didn't start the insults.

I take more issue with this set of Niobium quotes:

i'm from Edinburgh and nobody says Edinburgher. trust me.

Followed later on by:

it's Edinburger, trust me.

:confused: :confused: :confused:

{FWIW, the person-from-Edinburgh I, uhhhhh, spent a good bit of time with ;) last weekend goes with the "there isn't a name for us" option.)

Stanislaus
10-31-2001, 05:24 AM
Originally posted by don willard
Wait, I still don't have a reply on whether those from Linlithgow are called Linlithwegians!

Well, wait no more for, astonishing though it might seem, I come from Linlithgow (birth-place not only of myself but also of Mary Queen of Scots - co-incidence?). Why, might I ask, did you pick the name of my esteemed home town? Not that I mind, it's just freaky.

Anyhow, the answer to your question is that someone from Linlithgow is called, of all things, "A Black Bitch."

No, really. Anyone born there (I was technically born in the hospital in Edinburgh, so I'm not sure if that counts) has the right, seldom taken up these days, to be known as a black bitch in reference to the town mascot. You can work out what the mascot is yourself. There's some heart-moving story about the dog ferrying food out to her master while he was imprisoned on an island on Linlithgow Loch, thus demonstrating loyalty and affection and yadayada.

In practice, there isn't really a term, but that's OK, there isn't a term for people from Bathgate, Uphall, Livingston etc. Best bet, if you must try to find a dialect idiom, is to use the phrase, "He's frae Lithgae" which is the popular contraction of the name.

So, now you know.

bibliophage
10-31-2001, 07:05 AM
Insulting the residents of various cities will not be tolerated in General Questions. I hope the OP's question has been answered to his satisfaction, because this thread is closed.

bibliophage
moderator GQ