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View Full Version : Is my rice cooker psychic, or what?


avacado
10-26-2001, 02:05 PM
How do electric rice cookers know when to stop?

I have a little electric rice cooker, with only one control: a "start" button. It cooks all sorts of rice properly, no matter how long the rice needs to be cooked (between 20 and 60 mintues). It never overcooks white rice or undercooks brown rice. It has neither timer nor setting for different rices. On the inside is an removable aluminum pan. Maybe there's a weight sensor underneath the pan? I can't tell.

This is a bottom-of-the-line entry among rice cookers. How does it know how long to cook?

gazpacho
10-26-2001, 02:24 PM
It has a thermostat that will switch off when the pot gets to hot. When there is water in the pot it cannot get hotter than boiling water. When the water is gone the pot can heat up then the heater turns off. However the amount of energy to get the bottom of the pot hot is not enough to burn the rice.

gazpacho
10-26-2001, 02:27 PM
Once again howstuff works also answers this question. Fortunately for me they don't disagree with my answer.

http://www.howstuffworks.com/question35.htm

GIGObuster
10-26-2001, 03:13 PM
And remember: even if you add cooked rice to gazpacho you still have to serve it cold:
http://www.ricecafe.com/outdoor5.htm

And also with avocado:
http://www.online-cookbook.com/goto/cook/rpage/000113






Iím sorry guys, I could not resist. :D

sailor
10-26-2001, 03:49 PM
I am always marvelled by the inventions of the white man. I mean you put a hot beverage in a thermos flask and it knows to keep it piping hot. You put a cold beverage and it knows to keep it ice cold. How the heck does it know? Progress is a great thing. Sciences advance more than we ever thought possible. What will they think of next? ^_*

Crafter_Man
10-26-2001, 04:41 PM
Originally posted by sailor
I mean you put a hot beverage in a thermos flask and it knows to keep it piping hot. You put a cold beverage and it knows to keep it ice cold. How the heck does it know?

Thermos flasks have embedded thermistors that measure the inside and outside temperatures. When the inside temperature is high (such as the case with coffee or soup), the vacuum-assisted insulation is electrically polarized to keep heat in. When the inside temperature is low (such as the case with milk or ice), the polarization of the insulation is reversed, thus keeping cold in. The circuit, which is embedded in the bottom of the flask, is powered by a thermopile, thus essentially making it a self-powered/battery-free device. (A thermopile generates electrical power using a temperature difference.)

tomndebb
10-26-2001, 04:54 PM
Whoooosh!

tomndebb
10-26-2001, 04:57 PM
That was not intended for this thread!

(Now that I look like I've whioooshed myself, I'll go sulk.)

Larry Mudd
10-26-2001, 05:28 PM
Originally posted by sailor
I am always marvelled by the inventions of the white man.I know you're joking, but I'm pretty sure that the rice-cooker was invented in Taiwan. For all of my Taiwanese friends, the rice-cooker is an indispensable kitchen appliance. I remember one conversation which, I swear, went: "Do you eat rice?" "Uh, yeah." "But you don't have a rice-cooker." "Uh.. yeah.." "How do you prepare it?" "In a pot, on the stove." "Does that work?"

China Guy
10-26-2001, 09:28 PM
Originally posted by Larry Mudd
[QUOTE]I remember one conversation which, I swear, went: "Do you eat rice?" "Uh, yeah." "But you don't have a rice-cooker." "Uh.. yeah.." "How do you prepare it?" "In a pot, on the stove." "Does that work?"
BWAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAH