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View Full Version : Installing Windows XP on a 2nd machine.


ThunderBunny
10-27-2001, 06:54 AM
I understand that when you install Windows XP, you have to call it in or log into the internet to get some sort of pass code. That pass code will work on one PC and one PC only.

The idea behind this is that you shouldn't be installing it on two computers - you should purchase a separate copy and install it on the other computer. (you know, like you have a separately purchased copy of every audio CD you enjoy, so you can play one in your car and one in your home stereo... maybe even a third to play in your walkman... swapping them back and forth would be evil and lead to the downfall of civilization as we know it!)

So, I'm wondering, if I install Windows XP on one machine, and then want to install it on a different machine after uninstalling it from the first machine, what will happen? Will Microsoft refuse, since they can't verify that it's uninstalled from the first one? Or is there something I'm missing?

handy
10-27-2001, 09:00 AM
From zdnet.com:


"From the time you first boot XP, you have 30 days to activate it either online or via telephone. The activation is based on a 50-digit installation code that consists of the XP software product ID and a hardware hash value. Once you activate XP, you can't make more than five major changes to the hardware configuration without reactivating. Every 120 days, the clock is reset and you can make an additional five hardware changes. If you replace or reformat the hard drive, you must always reactivate."

Glory
10-27-2001, 09:46 AM
So, I'm wondering, if I install Windows XP on one machine, and then want to install it on a different machine after uninstalling it from the first machine, what will happen?

No, that's a legitimate reason. The EULA states that Windows XP can only be active on one computer at a time, so if you reinstall after removing it completely from the initial machine, you are within the terms of the EULA.

What will happen when you attempt to reinstall on the second machine:

1. You will be prompted to call a CSR
2. The CSR will ask you for your installation ID
3. The CSR will ask you some questions, and once you explain what happened, they will activate you.
4. CSR will give you a Confirmation ID
5. You're done.

ThunderBunny
10-27-2001, 10:40 AM
Originally posted by Glory
So, I'm wondering, if I install Windows XP on one machine, and then want to install it on a different machine after uninstalling it from the first machine, what will happen?1. You will be prompted to call a CSR
2. The CSR will ask you for your installation ID
3. The CSR will ask you some questions, and once you explain what happened, they will activate you.
4. CSR will give you a Confirmation ID
5. You're done. OK, I guess that makes sense. So from their perspective, if they see the same code number appear 30 times (or on 30 different machines in a short amount of time) they would no longer give the authentication number for that code. Thus, if a single copy of Windows XP is copied and distributed, it can be shut down.

Thanks, I understand better now.

Bad Hat
10-27-2001, 01:31 PM
Heres my concern about this. I work in audio and have 3 different PCs, one ofthem is devoted entirely to audio. To that end I have installed Win2K on it clean, installed only 3 audio programs and a Pro Sound Card, and disconnected every card and peripheral that isn't audio related, in particular, the modem and network cards.

I hate the idea that if at some point I decide to upgrade to XP or some post-XP OS, I will haveto install a modem on my lean mean sound machine, and I'd rather not deal with this. is there a telephone option? is there any way around this really annoying new feature?
the Hat

handy
10-27-2001, 05:45 PM
If you buy XP from a big store now, they have nice people there with shirts that say Microsoft XP on them, to give you info. I saw one at Staples. I didn't see a telephone option in the manual yet but Im sure there is.

sailor
10-27-2001, 06:04 PM
Yes, you can activate by phone... if you can read a long string of idgits from the screen.

Niobium Knight
10-28-2001, 12:14 AM
you know what i hate about it - it's so expensive. just encourages pirate copies.

DPWhite
10-28-2001, 12:40 AM
quarter of a hijack here:

I've heard that the license is only for a certain period of time, then your license runs out and it stops working. Can anyone confirm this.

ElwoodCuse
10-28-2001, 12:55 AM
Does this affect your computer if you change it after you already install it? I'm considering getting XP but I'm also considering doing a serious upgrade to my machine (mobo, video card, processor, more ram). If I install XP then a month later do this upgrade, will XP wig out when I turn it on or only if I tried to install it a second time?

TlighT
10-28-2001, 06:12 AM
Originally posted by ElwoodCuse
Does this affect your computer if you change it after you already install it? I'm considering getting XP but I'm also considering doing a serious upgrade to my machine (mobo, video card, processor, more ram). If I install XP then a month later do this upgrade, will XP wig out when I turn it on or only if I tried to install it a second time?
It would be possible for your XP installation to ask for a new activation code if you change multiple pieces of hardware in your system (I believe to have read it'll still be possible to change four pieces of hardware during a short period before reactivation is required). But in that case reactivation will be simply asking for a new activation code and explain that you upgraded your pc and no further questions will be asked. That is, if you bought the retail version, I don't know what the deal is with OEM versions.

kanicbird
10-28-2001, 08:51 AM
when all the hubub came about I heard that you could install it on 2 machines (ie laptop and desktop) - the 1st instalation would give you the 'code' for the 2nd but the 2nd install is a one shot deal - no chance at reinstalling it using that code? anyone else hear this?

Glory
10-28-2001, 09:20 AM
K2Dave,

when all the hubub came about I heard that you could install it on 2 machines (ie laptop and desktop) - the 1st instalation would give you the 'code' for the 2nd but the 2nd install is a one shot deal - no chance at reinstalling it using that code? anyone else hear this?

You might be thinking about Office XP which allows 2 activations (desktop, laptop). Windows XP only allows one activation: one active copy of Windows XP on ONE computer at a time. The situation you are describing "one shot 2nd install" I have never heard about in relation to Windows XP.

ElwoodCuse,

TlighT answered your question very well. Please also read what Handy posted:

"From the time you first boot XP, you have 30 days to activate it either online or via telephone. The activation is based on a 50-digit installation code that consists of the XP software product ID and a hardware hash value. Once you activate XP, you can't make more than five major changes to the hardware configuration without reactivating. Every 120 days, the clock is reset and you can make an additional five hardware changes. If you replace or reformat the hard drive, you must always reactivate."

If you are prompted to reactivate and call a CSR, they will ask you questions to determine if you are still within the terms of the EULA. If you upgrade your computer, it is still the same computer and you are still within the terms of your EULA.

DPWhite,

I've heard that the license is only for a certain period of time, then your license runs out and it stops working. Can anyone confirm this.

There is no "timebomb" of the license. Perhaps you heard about the 120 day hardware upgrade clock reset (see above) and interpreted it incorrectly?

Bad Hat

You can definitely activate by phone! I just spent the last year of my life (almost) creating/developing/delivering Office XP and Windows XP training to call center reps all over the world. When you select "telephone" to activate, you are prompted to select your country or region (your country is not known by Microsoft) in order to generate a 1-800 number.

Thunderbunny

OK, I guess that makes sense. So from their perspective, if they see the same code number appear 30 times (or on 30 different machines in a short amount of time) they would no longer give the authentication number for that code. Thus, if a single copy of Windows XP is copied and distributed, it can be shut down

Yes, they can use the Product ID number to track abuse (huge numbers of activations of that product) and "block" that PID from future activations. This is for blatant piracy though. For example, if you upgrade your computer so often that you need 3 activations in one year, this will not affect you.

ski
10-28-2001, 11:15 AM
It's stuff like this that makes pirated software so popular among lots of folks. Anyone want to place a guess on when "cracked" versions will be available on gnutella? I'm guessing it's going to be pretty soon.

TlighT
10-28-2001, 12:03 PM
Originally posted by ski
It's stuff like this that makes pirated software so popular among lots of folks. Anyone want to place a guess on when "cracked" versions will be available on gnutella? I'm guessing it's going to be pretty soon.
Actually, MS also publishes a corporate version of Windows XP. These versions are targetted at large companies who have to install a lot of pc's at once and they don't require product activation. As a consequence, most of the illegally distributed versions of Windows XP are corporate versions. A leaked corporate final version of Windows XP Professional (devilsown for insiders) has been available for about 3 months now.

handy
10-28-2001, 01:48 PM
Hey ski, they have been out for a long time already. I won't say where to get them though. The copy protection looks complex but it's really simple.

Keeve
10-28-2001, 02:48 PM
Originally posted by Niobium Knight
you know what i hate about it - it's so expensive. just encourages pirate copies.

Do expensive cars encourage you to steal them as well?

ski
10-28-2001, 03:35 PM
Originally posted by Keeve
Originally posted by Niobium Knight
you know what i hate about it - it's so expensive. just encourages pirate copies.

Do expensive cars encourage you to steal them as well?

No, but I know exactly what Knight is talking about. The more expensive you make a readily-copyable item, the more you encourage people to pirate that item. Cars are clearly different, you can't just "copy" them, and they are somewhat difficult to steal. But more importantly, you're more likely to get caught.

For example. If you wanted a cassette tape (yeah, I know, old example but still valid) of, say, Britney Spears :p, you'd probably buy it for $8-10. But if they wanted $100 for it, you'd probably just say, heck with it I'll copy my friend's. Or even better, ever photocopied something that said "reproduction prohibited except through express permission of (the company)"? Things like maps come readily to mind. The more expensive you make it to get ahold of a legitimate copy, the more you encourage pirating. Especially if there's really no fear of getting caught.

I say "you" a lot, but really just in the generic sense. Maybe YOU don't make illegal copies of software, and maybe I don't either, but across world, I'd say that's certainly the minority.

kanicbird
10-28-2001, 04:07 PM
I just bought XP - didn't install it yet - If i were to obtain a pirrated copy that doesn't require product activation - I'd use that instead of my legal copy - less hassle.

Also other software I own (have a license to use :rolleyes: ) that requires a code or other from of product activation I have no problems looking for a crack or other download to avoid the hassle.

RickJay
10-28-2001, 04:18 PM
I guess a more relevant question is, why do I want to upgrade, anyway? Win 98 works great. I'll start another thread.

handy
10-29-2001, 05:15 PM
RickJay, some of the older versions don't support large HD, the new memory, larger memory, etc etc. Also new versions work faster & more stable usually, well, seldom. Plus, new ones have more drivers for more things, etc.

Poloin99
10-29-2001, 05:27 PM
How about XP professional... Do I have to call that in?

Barney111
10-29-2001, 07:00 PM
Here's the scoop:

You have 30 days to activate XP (by web or phone) or the program shuts down.

Once activated, you can change six pieces of hardware (as long as one isn't your network card) before it shuts down and you have to call for reactivation. You can change four pieces of hardware if one of them is your network card. Apparently your network card hardware ID# is the main part of the code algorithm.

The kicker is the activation scheme resets every 120 days. So,technically, you can wait 4 months and install XP on computer #2. Legal? No. Is Microsoft asking for it? Yes.

NutWrench
10-29-2001, 11:01 PM
What happens a few years from now when Microsoft stops supporting Windows XP? Presumably, it won't be possible to get activation codes anymore. I think letting Microsoft decide when it's time for me to upgrade is a bad idea.

Smitty
10-30-2001, 07:03 AM
Originally posted by Poloin99
How about XP professional... Do I have to call that in?

Yes, unless you have a copy distributed under one of the bulk licensing arrangements