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View Full Version : An Important Question About Eggs


06-02-1999, 06:03 PM
A couple of hours ago I made some boiled eggs- just the way me mum suggested in order to avoid cracking them. I brought the water to a boil, then let it sit for half an hour. Sometimes it works. But that is niether here nor there.

The problem is, they didn't cook quite as much as I'd like. The yolks are solid, but still dark in the middle. Eeeeeewwwwwe, gross. My question- what will happen if I put them back on to boil (the already-opened egg being excluded)?

06-02-1999, 06:08 PM
Dark in the middle? Sounds like you got a fertilized egg there. If the eggs are advertised as "free range" its a good bet that a rooster came a callin'. It might look gross, but it shouldn't taste any different.

06-02-1999, 06:17 PM
What I meant to say :
The yolk is dark-er in the middle. Like uncooked yolk is darker than cooked. Please don't make me think about roosters.

06-02-1999, 06:54 PM
Hmmm... Melatonin, it sounds as if you've got the kind of hard-cooked egg that serious cooks would kill for. A "perfect" hard cooked egg is just done - no icky green layer around the yolk, and the yolk is just hardened through. Usually, that means that the very core of the yolk is somewhite darker than the rest.

Given that that's not what you want, try bringing the water to a boil with the eggs in it, allowing it to boil for about 14-15 minutes, then taking it off the burner and removing the eggs from the water. They'll be done all the way through.

As far as re-boiling them, well, I don't see why it wouldn't work. I'd put 'em in the water, bring it to a boil, and boil for 1-2 minutes. Lemme know if it works.

06-02-1999, 07:10 PM
Athena is right - put the eggs in hot tap water and then let water come to a boil -boil
about 15 minutes - but I'd like to add an important step: remove the pan from the burner, and immediately run cold tap water into the pan over the eggs for about a minute, then let the eggs sit in the cool water in the pan. After about half an hour refrigerate. Running cold water over them right away results in easy peeling of the shell.

06-02-1999, 07:17 PM
As far as the "dark-er" part is concerned, I think it's no big deal; it's probably even a bit more moist than the rest of the yolk. If you re-boil, you run the risk of having a rubbery white and a quite dry yolk (although I never tried).

I usually take my eggs out of the fridge some 20-30 minutes before cooking, put them in warm water, wait until water is hot (not boiling) and let them cook some ten minutes or so at medium/high temperature. Voilą!!

06-02-1999, 08:07 PM
Using OLD eggs makes for easier peeling.

Reboil them if you want.

Next time you use the boil water and let sit trick, put a plate on the top of the pan and let sit longer.

But then why don't you just boil them longer?

06-03-1999, 06:01 PM
I used to have to boil and peel a LOT of eggs every day, so it was critical that they were cooked correctly, and that they peeled easily.

To keep the eggs from cracking in boiling water, allow them to warm up to room temperature first. Takes about 1/2 hour or so. Don't worry, eggs don't go bad as fast as everyone thinks. They can safely be left unrefrigerated for many hours.

I used 2 pots.

Put a pot of water on to boil.

Put the (room temperature) eggs in another pot, and set it aside.

When the water boils, replace it on the heating element with the pot of eggs, and pour the boiling water over them. Set the empty pot in the drainer (It's clean already, and it so hot that it will be dry in a minute).

Don't let them boil for more than 10 minutes, or they will be overdone, and hard to peel.

Then, just as Sycorax said, run cold water over them immediately and they will peel much easier. When I had access to such luxuries, I even put a large scoop of ice in the pan.

Roll the eggs on a flat surface to create a belt-like cracked region all around the egg, and the two halves of the shell will twist right off. Rinse the peeled egg under cold water, set it aside, and grab another one.

You can peel about 12 eggs per minute this way.

06-03-1999, 06:01 PM
I used to have to boil and peel a LOT of eggs every day, so it was critical that they were cooked correctly, and that they peeled easily.

To keep the eggs from cracking in boiling water, allow them to warm up to room temperature first. Takes about 1/2 hour or so. Don't worry, eggs don't go bad as fast as everyone thinks. They can safely be left unrefrigerated for many hours.

I used 2 pots.

Put a pot of water on to boil.

Put the (room temperature) eggs in another pot, and set it aside.

When the water boils, replace it on the heating element with the pot of eggs, and pour the boiling water over them. Set the empty pot in the drainer (It's clean already, and it so hot that it will be dry in a minute).

Don't let them boil for more than 10 minutes, or they will be overdone, and hard to peel.

Then, just as Sycorax said, run cold water over them immediately and they will peel much easier. When I had access to such luxuries, I even put a large scoop of ice in the pan.

Roll the eggs on a flat surface to create a belt-like cracked region all around the egg, and the two halves of the shell will twist right off. Rinse the peeled egg under cold water, set it aside, and grab another one.

You can peel about 12 eggs per minute this way.

-Monte



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"Oxen are slow, but the earth is patient." -- some Chinese guy