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-   -   What conditions get you labeled as 4-F in the military (https://boards.straightdope.com/sdmb/showthread.php?t=749085)

Wesley Clark 02-12-2015 07:14 PM

What conditions get you labeled as 4-F in the military
 
Obviously conditions like paraplegia, or missing limbs or blindness will get you labeled unfit for service.

But I get the impression some conditions that don't seem that serious get you labeled 4-F. I heard up until Vietnam you couldn't joint the military if you took any prescription medications. So if you were on blood pressure meds you were disqualified. Is this true? If so, when/why did it change?

What about braces? Does that get you disqualified? Vision problems that are correctable by glasses? Hearing problems corrected by hearing aids? Doesn't almost everyone have at least 'something' wrong with them?

What about depression or anxiety? Occasional knee pain? Asthma?

bizerta 02-12-2015 07:24 PM

IIRC: 4-F was not a military classification. 4-F was a Selective Service classification.

Lemur866 02-12-2015 07:39 PM

There's no such thing as 4-F anymore, since we don't have a draft anymore.

Morgenstern 02-12-2015 08:21 PM

Yes, high blood pressure would keep you out of the draft back then. I'm told the reason why is that if you served 90 days, and then they discovered you had high blood pressure, they might have to medically retire you.

There were a slew of things that could keep you out. From acne on your back (severe I suppose, so as to not be able to wear a back back) to problems with your feet that prevented marching. There were some mental issues and some related to IQ. Back at that time, attorneys made a practice out of helping those who did not want to go into the military avoid service. There were special doctors sympathetic to the anti-draft movement who likewise provided medical opinions/diagnoses (but not treatments) seeking to help a person be excluded from the draft.

Early on, just being married would exclude you, but that quickly changed to married with kids. That quickly evaporated and marital, parenthood status didn't matter at all.

IQ was another factor they tested for. However, they got around that with McNamara's 100 thousand. (google it, it's pathetic)

The problem was that anyone graduating from high school basically has his life in turmoil for a few years. Either he went to college (2S deferment) or he enlisted, or waited to be called. Finally they set up a lottery which resulted in a drawing of birth dates, and, in that order, being called to serve.

I remember smoking some @#$%@% on the government bus on the way to the Induction center in LA for the physical. (that's where the mandatory pre-draft physicals were given) That was a real joke. Can you write your name and pee warm pee? Cool your government needs you. You walked into the entry way and there you were stopped by a Sergeant. He pointed to two doors. one (the right) led to the medical processing area. The one on the left, led to a glass room with benches and about a half dozen souls sitting there looking like they were waiting for a bus to hell. The sergeant pointed out that we could behave and go home that night, or, if we didn't, we would be told to sit in the glass room, and later that night we'd be picked up and transported to basic training. We all behaved rather well.

It was a shitty time for young men in America.

ETA, broken bones, things like that would just get you rescheduled a few months down the road. Depression, I doubt it. Asthma, possibly.

kopek 02-12-2015 08:30 PM

Hearing and serious vision flaws and the one everyone prayed for - flat feet. As I recall, diabetics and similar that needed regular medication was an instant out as well.

Mr. Goob 02-12-2015 08:47 PM

I dislocated my knee and had surgery at 15. At 18 I was told no one would take me except the Navy, which is where I wanted to go anyways.

Only because of my high test scores did they send me to 2 specialists to get a waver.

tonyfop 02-12-2015 08:57 PM

My dad was 4-F from WWII and Korea due to flat feet. When I enlisted in the Navy, I failed my first physical due to the acne on my back. I was given time to clear it up, but was told that I could not use Tetracycline. I had friends who helped my with Oxy for the next few weeks, and it mostly cleared up. I got in, but my "Backne" still bothers me. You would think that at 45 I would be done with puberty.

garxie 02-12-2015 09:01 PM

Gregg Allman shot himself in the foot to get out of the draft.

yabob 02-12-2015 09:06 PM

Overweight or underweight. Some guys ate themselves into obesity or starved themselves down for the physical. However, IIRC, that could just get you retested in a few months, too, if you weren't that far over the line. I had a 2S, but I was the last year that could get one. They did away with that deferment for the last couple years of the draft. The 2S deferred you until you graduated from college. There was also a 1S that just let you finish out your current school year. Your draft board tried to dissuade you from the 2S by pointing out that it increased your eligibility by 2 years for every year you were deferred.

Quote:

Sarge, I'm only eighteen, I got a ruptured spleen
And I always carry a purse
I got eyes like a bat, and my feet are flat
My asthma's getting worse
"Always carry a purse" ... you always heard that one thing they would not question, and simply reject you for, is if you told them you were a homosexual. However, that would get you a permanent record of that "fact" following you around. In the 1970s that was not something you wanted, whether you were actually gay or straight. I don't believe it actually worked as advertised anyway.

(That bit was used by Dr. Freedman on "MASH" to call Klinger's bluff at one point, too.)

UncaStuart 02-12-2015 09:09 PM

Boy, that was a while ago, but anecdotally, these three conditions resulted in 4-F at my exam:
  • Extra vertebra (born with) + 2 fractured vertebrae (fell out of a tree) [Me. My 20/400 vision would not have made me 4-F]
  • Flat feet [body builder standing next to me in exam room, all muscle, but he had no arches at all]
  • Eczema [High School acquaintance in same group; both legs a rashy mess]

ETA: This was in 1970, when the need for people was pretty high.

Ranger Jeff 02-12-2015 09:52 PM

There was a story about a guy who in 1965, got a 4-F for a conviction for Littering and Creating a Public Nuisance.

Morgenstern 02-12-2015 10:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ranger Jeff (Post 18130238)
There was a story about a guy who in 1965, got a 4-F for a conviction for Littering and Creating a Public Nuisance.

See Alice's Restaurant.
(Arlo Guthrie)

panache45 02-12-2015 10:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by yabob (Post 18130137)
"Always carry a purse" ... you always heard that one thing they would not question, and simply reject you for, is if you told them you were a homosexual. However, that would get you a permanent record of that "fact" following you around. In the 1970s that was not something you wanted, whether you were actually gay or straight. I don't believe it actually worked as advertised anyway.

Yes, it "worked as advertised" . . . at least in my case. That's because in my case it was true. You had to go into a little room, and be interviewed by some kind of doctor/shrink, behind a desk. If you were very effeminate and lisped, he was very good at weeding out the fakes. But if you acted like a normal gay young man, you stood a better chance. I remember he asked about how I met men, and my history with women. I just answered truthfully and got a 1-Y. Or it may have been the skin-tight white jeans, which were a sure sign back in the 60s, but not so over-the-top.

hajario 02-13-2015 12:05 AM

My Uncle was classified as 4-F because of migraines.

Senegoid 02-13-2015 12:30 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ranger Jeff (Post 18130238)
There was a story about a guy who in 1965, got a 4-F for a conviction for Littering and Creating a Public Nuisance.

But that dude also got good and drunk the night before, so he looked and felt his best when he went in there that morning.

As for me: I got classified 4-F, circa 1970, due to a letter a doctor wrote to my draft board -- A doctor that I hadn't seen for two years. But the doc didn't send me a copy, and I was too dumb at the time to ask him for one. To this very day, I don't know what that letter said, or why I was 4-F. But I wasn't complaining, of course. This was at the height of the Vietnam "war". I assumed, possibly wisely, that having gotten my treasured 4-F classification, I should just STFU and leave it be.

I saw a list of medical conditions that could get one marked 4-F. Colleges were full of draft counselors in those days, with publications like that, or other advice on how to beat the draft. Pacifist groups like the Quakers had publications like that. One way to get 4-F was to have your penis amputated. They didn't want guys who had to sit down to pee, I guess.

My big brother enlisted in the Army the day he graduated from high school (in 1959, so no major wars going on then other than the Cold one). Got out in 1962 or 1963, went to college, joined ROTC, planned to make a military career -- then after all that, got rejected for OCS because of high blood pressure.

ETA: Just recently, maybe 5 years ago, I wrote to the Selective Service folks to ask if I could get a copy of that letter. I mean, this is modern government. They keep ALL records on EVERYTHING, FOREVER, right? Not quite. They wrote back that all they had anymore from that era was some skeletal summary data, but not the actual source documents. And here, all this time, I though that everyone in government kept ALL records on EVERYTHING, FOREVER. So to this day, I don't know why I was classified 4-F.

Habeed 02-13-2015 03:13 AM

Regarding the homosexual thing : they didn't have computers, then. Just paper files. If you got D-Qed for being gay, how likely was this to follow you around? Could employers even get the records?

I mean, we all know now that the FBI had a lot of BS FBI files on a lot of folks. But how many of those files even mattered? I mean, didn't the FBI have bigger fish to fry than a few weenies who got out of the draft for being queer? They had commie radicals and stuff to chase back then, did they not?

Monty 02-13-2015 03:20 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Lemur866 (Post 18129937)
There's no such thing as 4-F anymore, since we don't have a draft anymore.

Ahem. Nobody's classified now, but when (if) conscription is activated, men subject to conscription will be classified as shown in that link.

TonySinclair 02-13-2015 04:24 AM

In one of Feynman's books, probably Surely You're Joking, he told how he was rejected for psychiatric reasons just for answering questions perfectly honestly. And this was during WWII. He even tried to tell them it was a mistake, which of course confirmed their opinion.

Also during WWII, Byron Nelson was rejected for some kind of bleeding disorder (but not hemophilia), and his pal Jug McSpadden was rejected for allergies. The two of them set all kinds of records on the PGA Tour in 1944 and 1945 playing against very depleted fields, Nelson for the most wins, and Jug for the most 2nd place finishes, among others.

I was very nearsighted, but they took me.

Hari Seldon 02-13-2015 07:44 AM

It is going to depend on how badly they need people. I had an uncle who was blind in one eye and was drafted. He was a crack hydromatic (the GM automatic transmission) mechanic and they sent him to Florida where he repaired tanks. By the time, I became eligible in 1955 I was a student and then a grad student and then teaching math, all of which got you a deferment in those days. But their needs were modest in those days, before VietNam heated up. Then I was past 26 and, while my deferments left me eligible till 35, they just didn't want us ancient folks.

I had two different friends who got classified 4F by simply showing up for the physical without underpants. When told to strip to his underpants he told them he wasn't wearing any. They told him to keep his pants on and he was the only person in this large room, save for the examiners, wearing pants. He felt like a freak and they deferred him, although without giving any reason. The second friend, having heard this story, did the same thing and was also deferred. I'm not sure I could have pulled this off, but was never called for a physical.

robby 02-13-2015 09:58 AM

On the subject of flat feet, I had two medical physicals in the 1980s, one to clear me for NROTC, and my pre-commissioning physical a few years later. I was cleared medically in both physicals.

Interestingly, in neither case was I asked to remove my socks. Good thing, because I have no arches whatsoever.

I've heard anecdotally that flat feet is less of an issue since the Vietnam era, and that they now distinguish between congenital flat feet and collapsed arches due to injury. That being said, I suspect that if you have flat feet today, and claim to experiencing problems related to this, that you will likely not be cleared medically for military service.

johnpost 02-13-2015 10:11 AM

if you pooped in your pants you would likely get just get classified as 4F and likely not get told to come back for a retesting.

worked for some.

yabob 02-13-2015 10:17 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by panache45 (Post 18130370)
Yes, it "worked as advertised" . . . at least in my case. That's because in my case it was true. You had to go into a little room, and be interviewed by some kind of doctor/shrink, behind a desk. If you were very effeminate and lisped, he was very good at weeding out the fakes. But if you acted like a normal gay young man, you stood a better chance. I remember he asked about how I met men, and my history with women. I just answered truthfully and got a 1-Y. Or it may have been the skin-tight white jeans, which were a sure sign back in the 60s, but not so over-the-top.

Well, that's actually what I would have suspected - they interviewed you to weed out guys who were faking. The story that floated around was that they would immediately reject you no questions asked, but you would have a flag on your "record" advertising you as homosexual forevermore. I doubted both statements. 1Y was "available, but only in extreme circumstances", given out for various medical conditions which would limit your effectiveness, such as the skin conditions discussed above. Reclassified to 4F in 1971, about the same time as they discontinued the 2S. I don't know how many details would be available as to the reason for your draft classification.

(I actually got my 2S after it had already been discontinued, pointing out to the draft board that I had already been in college by then. I had just pulled an extremely low number in the pool, and I was surprised that I got grandfathered in.)

Hypno-Toad 02-13-2015 10:28 AM

My dad was 4-f from having had polio as a kid. His whole life, he could never raise his left arm higher than his shoulder. This was doubly problematic since he was a leftie.

astorian 02-13-2015 11:10 AM

What I've always heard is that the answer to the OP's question varies wildly, depending on how badly the Army needs men.

In peacetime, flat feet, perforated eardums or homosexuality might have gotten you out of the draft. But during wartime, the SSS tended to look the other way for all those things.

kunilou 02-13-2015 11:33 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by astorian (Post 18131290)
What I've always heard is that the answer to the OP's question varies wildly, depending on how badly the Army needs men.

That was certainly my father's case in World War 2. He tried to enlist after Pearl Harbor and was rejected for having a heart murmur. By September 1942 the heart murmur wasn't even enough of a problem to disqualify him for combat, much less the draft.

johnpost 02-13-2015 11:49 AM

also it depends on what they needed. if they needed medical people then the criteria to be 4F might be different if you qualified.

Habeed 02-13-2015 03:58 PM

What's so bad about flat feet? I take it this reduces your marching range before foot failure or something?

robby 02-13-2015 06:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Habeed (Post 18132106)
What's so bad about flat feet? I take it this reduces your marching range before foot failure or something?

One problem can be if you are required to wear standard-issue footwear with built-in arches, especially if the footwear consists of boots made by the lowest bidder.

Personally, I was a Navy officer. The one pair of required steel-toed boots I was issued (for summer training) didn't have particularly high arches, and I never had any issues with the standard-issue oxfords.

Later, I was in the submarine force, so my footwear at sea consisted of running shoes (which are much quieter belowdecks than boots).

I've found that boots are hit-or-miss for me. I bought a pair of Timberline steel-toed boots once (required in my current job when I go out in the field), and found that they were unwearable for me. I was in agony wearing them. I ended up paying top dollar for some Redwing boots, which fit wonderfully, so much so that I immediately bought three more pairs. (Oh, and I gave the Timberlines to a construction worker whose boots were held together with duct tape.)

Wesley Clark 02-13-2015 07:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by robby (Post 18132499)
One problem can be if you are required to wear standard-issue footwear with built-in arches, especially if the footwear consists of boots made by the lowest bidder.

But things like this are why I'm confused. To me this makes no sense. You can always buy a pair of boots with a lower arch, it is harder to get an extra soldier I would assume.

Why kick people out of the military when a $40 pair of non standard boots with a lower arch would work fine for them?

Bookkeeper 02-15-2015 04:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Wesley Clark (Post 18132573)
But things like this are why I'm confused. To me this makes no sense. You can always buy a pair of boots with a lower arch, it is harder to get an extra soldier I would assume.

Why kick people out of the military when a $40 pair of non standard boots with a lower arch would work fine for them?

How do you keep these in stock and distribute them properly so you can resupply this guy with his non-standard boots in various postings in the US and overseas, or in in combat?

(The Germans got around this problem in WW2 by creating entire units of men with the same medical problems, so that any special support requirements would be at the unit level rather than isolated soldiers all over the place. A number of these served as static fortress troops in the Normandy defenses.)

Wendell Wagner 02-15-2015 09:15 PM

I became 4-F in the following way: I was sent a notice when I was 18 (in 1970) that the draft board needed to know if there was anything that automatically disqualified me from serving in the military. They included a form with this notice that any doctor could fill out if they knew of a medical condition that disqualified me. I went to my family doctor and asked him to measure my height. He measured it and put down that I was 4 foot and 10 1/2 inches tall. (Perhaps I'm a little closer to 4 foot and 11 inches tall, but in any case I'm clearly short enough to disqualify me for military service.) He mailed this form to the draft board. At the time in any case, no male under 5 foot tall could be drafted. The draft board then sent me a letter saying that I was classified 1-Y, which meant that they wouldn't draft me at that point, but I was in a large group of potential draftees who they might draft if they got desperate. A year or so later, they reclassified me as 4-F. The various classifications are discussed here:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Selective_Service_System

There's a famous article by James Fallows about how richer, more educated potential draftees were able to game the system by knowing better what sort of things the military rejected people for. Full disclosure: I know Fallows a little bit. Here's the article:

http://www.washingtonmonthly.com/fea...1.fallows.html

rowrrbazzle 02-15-2015 11:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Morgenstern (Post 18130026)
ETA, broken bones, things like that would just get you rescheduled a few months down the road. Depression, I doubt it. Asthma, possibly.

I had a low draft number and went for my physical in 1971, my senior year of college. I had fairly severe asthma, and I had a spontaneous (really) attack during the physical. I had my rescue inhaler with me, but I didn't use it until after the chest doc examined me. I got my 1Y, and after that classification was discontinued at the end of the year, I got the 4F.

aruvqan 02-16-2015 04:33 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Wendell Wagner (Post 18136622)
At the time in any case, no male under 5 foot tall could be drafted. l

Not drafted, but at one point in time I was living with a guy in one of the helicopter mine sweeping units, and there was a guy in the ground crew who was under 5 feet tall. My bf joked it was so they could shove him into places to do repairs fast without having to disassemble cowlings to get at the repair jobs.

I never understood how the Navy would put these huge guys into the submarine service. At various times on my husbands boats there were guys that used to be hulking football players and one officer who was something like 6'7 and had a permanent bruise on his head from bashing it into things on the boat. These poor guys barely fit in their bunks ... [coffin sized, something like 6 feet by 3 feet by 3 feet]

Quartz 02-16-2015 05:14 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by aruvqan (Post 18137228)
Not drafted, but at one point in time I was living with a guy in one of the helicopter mine sweeping units, and there was a guy in the ground crew who was under 5 feet tall. My bf joked it was so they could shove him into places to do repairs fast without having to disassemble cowlings to get at the repair jobs.

You may joke, but I was taught that the RAF in WW2 specifically targeted people with dwarfism because they could get to places that full-sized people could not.

Alessan 02-16-2015 06:15 AM

There are very few advantages to being tall in a modern military. Maybe you can carry a bit more, but that's about it; the downsides include being a bigger target, and having much harder time fitting inside vehicles.

Wendell Wagner 02-16-2015 06:20 AM

aruvqan, what year did this happen? I've been told that in the Vietnam War era, the height requirement for men was that they couldn't be less than 5 foot or more than 6 foot 6. I've been told that now the requirement for both men and women is that they can't be less than 4 foot 10 or more than 6 foot 8. Does anyone have the entire history of the height requirements of the American military for both sexes over all the time that the military has had any height requirements (and perhaps a citation for it)? Yeah, I'm sure that you can come up with anecdotes about particular rejections at particular times, but I'd like to know the entire history.

Clothahump 02-16-2015 03:27 PM

I had a student deferment for quite a while, then lost it. When I got my "letter", I went in for my physical bearing my medical records that showed I was deaf in my right ear and had been since birth. I thought that would give me the old 4-F in no time flat.

Nope. 1-A, but with an endorsement that said Profile 2. I found out later that meant I was fit for non-combat duty. It became immaterial when I got a high draft number, but I have sometimes wondered how my life would have been if I had gone into the Army for 4 years, gotten an honorable discharge and had access to college education benefits, etc.

Habeed 02-17-2015 03:34 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Alessan (Post 18137276)
There are very few advantages to being tall in a modern military. Maybe you can carry a bit more, but that's about it; the downsides include being a bigger target, and having much harder time fitting inside vehicles.

Carry more, inherently faster marching and running speed. When I went through basic training I noticed clear trends, and once I went to medical school I found out that growth hormones generally give a taller person more total muscle tissue to scale with their larger skeletons. Shorter people may visually appear bulkier because taller people can gain just as much muscle mass without it being as visually apparent since the muscles are spread across a larger area.

With that said, I agree with you that for the task of running war machines such as ships, tanks, and aircraft, increased height is probably a slight disadvantage. The designers of such vehicles have every incentive to shave where they can.

TonySinclair 02-17-2015 03:53 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Habeed (Post 18139745)
The designers of such vehicles have every incentive to shave where they can.

You should see the Brazilian ships.

Alessan 02-17-2015 03:57 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Habeed (Post 18139745)
Carry more, inherently faster marching and running speed. When I went through basic training I noticed clear trends, and once I went to medical school I found out that growth hormones generally give a taller person more total muscle tissue to scale with their larger skeletons. Shorter people may visually appear bulkier because taller people can gain just as much muscle mass without it being as visually apparent since the muscles are spread across a larger area.

I'm a big guy myself, but based on my own infantry experience, the best "terrain eaters" and long-distance runners, more often than not, were wiry little guys - marathon runner body types. OTOH, they did tend to give us tall kids more to carry (in my case, a machine gun), so I suspect there's a certain balance point there.

Quartz 02-17-2015 05:04 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Alessan (Post 18139757)
I'm a big guy myself, but based on my own infantry experience, the best "terrain eaters" and long-distance runners, more often than not, were wiry little guys - marathon runner body types.

A mate is a Royal Marine and fits this to a T.

RivkahChaya 02-17-2015 06:24 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Wendell Wagner (Post 18137283)
aruvqan, what year did this happen? I've been told that in the Vietnam War era, the height requirement for men was that they couldn't be less than 5 foot or more than 6 foot 6. I've been told that now the requirement for both men and women is that they can't be less than 4 foot 10 or more than 6 foot 8. Does anyone have the entire history of the height requirements of the American military for both sexes over all the time that the military has had any height requirements (and perhaps a citation for it)? Yeah, I'm sure that you can come up with anecdotes about particular rejections at particular times, but I'd like to know the entire history.

There was a woman in my basic training unit who was very short. She has to supply a doctor's note that she didn't have any form of dwarfism that might compromise her skeleton, and was just someone who was short. Apparently people, or women in a range, I'm not sure what it is, can get this. This is when the Army allowed one waiver, no matter what it was. You could have a waiver for mild asthma, a waiver for having a juvenile record you had not had expunged, a waiver for having vision that was poorer than X, but better than Y, so long as you just had one waiver, this height waiver, or a number of other things, but you couldn't have two-- at least to start basic. Once you were an soldier who had finished training, you might have more than one waiver. I knew a guy who had a waiver that allowed him to be up to ten pounds overweight as long as he continued to pass his PT tests. His PT test scores were very high, so they brought up the average for his company, but he couldn't quite make weight, and he couldn't make tape, because he had these weirdly narrow wrists.

OffByOne 02-17-2015 04:55 PM

When I started college, I was asked by some group if I wanted to sign up for a college deferment. I was only 17 at the time, so I dismissed it and never thought about it again.

Until I got that letter from Uncle Sam, telling me to be at the county courthouse steps at X:00 in the morning on such and such a date. I went to my doctor to get a paper that said that he had treated me for back problems. That was going to be how I did not end dead in Viet Nam.

Just about a week before I was due to be inspected, injected, and see-lected, I had my wisdom teeth extracted. In the hospital. With full anesthetic (and five-part harmony). After the surgery, they gave me some pain pills, but I couldn't swallow them. (My throat was so sore from (apparently) swallowed blood, that I could not even swallow the mushroom bits in a can of mushroom soup!)

So, after too little sleep, off I go to take my draft physical, clutching my doctor's note tightly in my fist. Wondering who I'm supposed to give it to, so they can let me go.

I was sure that my lack of sleep meant that I was going to fail the hearing test. We had already been warned, however, that if anyone failed that test, they would take it again and again, until they either passed, or failed with the exact same score as their other failures.

Finally, I got to see the doctor that would look at my doctor's note. He glanced at it, and then gave it back to me, with barely a "Hmmph!" I started to lose hope -- if he didn't care about my back problems, well, that was it, then, wasn't it?

No, since he also had all of the information about me that had been collected from the beginning of the examination. "We cannot make your glasses in the Army." What? That threw me for a bit. I almost blurted out, "But I can bring a spare pair!" But I shut my mouth, and just sucked it up.

During the ride back to the county courthouse, we learned that of the three busses that transferred us back and forth, two now held newly disqualified examinees.

A short time later, I received my 1-Y deferment.

That was in June. In September, President Nixon went on TV to participate in the first ever Selective Service System lottery. Guess what birthdate he picked first? Mine! Guess what initial letter of last names he picked. Mine! (You're getting good at guessing!).

So, I expected to get another letter indicating that they'd like to have another shot at me. Instead, I got a letter explaining how they had gotten rid of the 1-Y classification, and that now I was considered 4-F.

I did experience fallout over the 4-F classification, however. During a job interview, I was asked to explain how I came to have the classification. I gave a complete and accurate description, but I could tell that they no longer considered me as a viable candidate.

aruvqan 02-17-2015 09:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Wendell Wagner (Post 18137283)
aruvqan, what year did this happen? I've been told that in the Vietnam War era, the height requirement for men was that they couldn't be less than 5 foot or more than 6 foot 6. I've been told that now the requirement for both men and women is that they can't be less than 4 foot 10 or more than 6 foot 8. Does anyone have the entire history of the height requirements of the American military for both sexes over all the time that the military has had any height requirements (and perhaps a citation for it)? Yeah, I'm sure that you can come up with anecdotes about particular rejections at particular times, but I'd like to know the entire history.

1985.

No idea how one would get the *entire* history for both genders, but there is a fair amount of minutia published by the government publishing bunch on the tedious discussion on policy and the finalized policies - not sure how far back the records go offhand though.

The Winkler 02-18-2015 01:27 AM

I believe both James Dean and Chevy Chase claimed homosexuality to avoid the draft. Apparently James Dean was indeed gay.

Urbanredneck 02-18-2015 02:36 AM

Not the same as the draft but when I went to enlist and went to take my physical, they noticed a limp I was trying to hide and I admitted to having a bone growth on my knee so I didnt pass.


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