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crazyjoe 06-22-2016 08:16 AM

Purple - The Raw Egg Test -- Is this a legitimate test?
 
I have been seeing a lot of ads for a new mattress called Purple on Facebook. The l nik is here:

www.onpurple.com

In the ads, they demonstrate why all other mattresses are awful by using "The raw egg test" where they drop a plate of glass with 4 raw eggs attached to it onto varying brands of mattresses in an effort to demonstrate why their mattress is better.

Is this test a legitimate predictor of how well a mattress will help with pressure points? Does this test actually demonstrate anything useful with regard to mattresses, or is it all hype and tomfoolery?

Thanks,

- An uncomfortable side-sleeper

bob++ 06-22-2016 09:00 AM

Sorry - I have no idea about the test - but why do they dress the lady demonstrator like someone from a 1940s advert?

dolphinboy 06-22-2016 09:11 AM

Companies sometimes come up with unique tests to 'prove' their products are better than those of competitors. I've never heard of a raw egg test and I would doubt it's an official government test for mattresses. It just so happens that in this specific case the eggs don't break. I don't think that really proves it's a better mattress, unless you happen to be a raw egg.

Johanna 06-22-2016 09:18 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bob++ (Post 19423862)
Sorry - I have no idea about the test - but why do they dress the lady demonstrator like someone from a 1940s advert?

1940s? :confused: I don't know what you're seeing.

The spokeswoman is identified as Goldilocks, and the dirndl sort of outfit is meant to look fairytaleish.

Folly 06-22-2016 09:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bob++ (Post 19423862)
Sorry - I have no idea about the test - but why do they dress the lady demonstrator like someone from a 1940s advert?

She's supposed to be Goldilocks.

I don't think the test demonstrates how great the mattress would be for a person. It shows that it's soft enough for the eggs to sink in so as not to be broken, and that the rest of the weight spread over the entire rest of the surface will prevent the plate from breaking the eggs, but since a person doesn't contact the entire surface area of the mattress with the person bits that don't sink in what does it prove?

jtur88 06-22-2016 10:22 AM

Here's an idea. Stop using a mattress. Like people in east Asia, just sleep on the floor. Put a couple of folded blankets under pressure points, and use a good pillow under your head. (If you have no carpet, you'll want a bit of padding under you.)

It took me about a week to really get used to it, and I've been sleeping on the floor for about four years. I've never felt better.

I'll even match Purple's offer on their thousand-dollar queen size -- I'll refund your money if you are not completely satisfied with sleeping on the floor.

Or do what teenagers do -- sleep on your pile of laundry.

Anaamika 06-22-2016 11:18 AM

I can sleep on the floor for a couple of days but then my back starts to hurt, so I don't think it's good for everyone. I have a fairly firm mattress, though.

One of the things I will say is mattresses are something you should not skimp on, if you can afford it. Do your research and buy a good one.

jtur88 06-22-2016 12:05 PM

If you do decide to sleep on the floor, learn how to get up. Even a young healthy person's back can be stressed by improper technique:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lwVhl04v0E4

DrCube 06-22-2016 01:07 PM

Or hammocks. Most of South America sleeps in hammocks instead of mattresses, I've heard. I used mine recently for a camping trip and it was a lot more comfortable than the air mattress I usually use.

Haldurson 06-22-2016 01:09 PM

Penn and Teller did an episode of their "Bull****!" on Showtime several years back on the sleep industry and how they try to convince people that they need to spend incredible amounts of money on beds. I was intending to link to it, but apparently the episode was deleted off of Youtube. But if you can find someplace to see it, I definitely recommend it.

Based on what I understand about beds, just find any inexpensive bed and mattress combination that feels comfortable to you (some people can get by with a simple mattress on a hardwood floor). If you have special medical needs (like my mom did) then it might be worth going into the premium price range. But don't start looking for a bed that can cure ailments that you don't actually have.

Boozahol Squid, P.I. 06-22-2016 01:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Haldurson (Post 19424544)
Penn and Teller did an episode of their "Bull****!" on Showtime several years back on the sleep industry and how they try to convince people that they need to spend incredible amounts of money on beds. I was intending to link to it, but apparently the episode was deleted off of Youtube. But if you can find someplace to see it, I definitely recommend it.

I didn't catch that episode. It's rather funny that Penn is now a shill for Sleep Number Beds on his podcast.

Irishman 06-22-2016 07:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dolphinboy (Post 19423889)
Companies sometimes come up with unique tests to 'prove' their products are better than those of competitors. I've never heard of a raw egg test and I would doubt it's an official government test for mattresses. It just so happens that in this specific case the eggs don't break. I don't think that really proves it's a better mattress, unless you happen to be a raw egg.

It's not presented as any sort of official government test. It's used as a demonstration of how their bed works differently than regular beds.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Folly (Post 19423915)
I don't think the test demonstrates how great the mattress would be for a person. It shows that it's soft enough for the eggs to sink in so as not to be broken, and that the rest of the weight spread over the entire rest of the surface will prevent the plate from breaking the eggs, but since a person doesn't contact the entire surface area of the mattress with the person bits that don't sink in what does it prove?

Bodies aren't flat. They don't sit flat against anything. On your back, you have the curves of the spine and neck. On your side, you have your shoulders and hips versus the torso. In each case, trying to lie on a flat surface causes discomfort that leads to chronic pain.

The result is the need to have support that contours to the body so that you are fully supported at all lower areas rather than having pressure concentrations and alignment issues those cause.

All mattresses try to address those issues. The coil springs of a mattress are designed with a changing resistance, so the pressure points sink lower and the non pressure points still get some support. Foam cushion layers work to provide a similar kind of cushioning, crushing more on the parts that lie lower and sticking up more in the higher areas to try to support them there.

The problem is that none of these solutions really work. The ideal solution would be a custom fit bed that contours directly to your body so you get equal support on all parts. This is impractical as well as less useful, as you might like to move over or lie differently or let someone else use the bed.

The point of the egg test is attempting to show that it is soft enough that it gives under the pressure points without increasing the pressure on those locations relative to the support the rest of the body gets.

This test uses a flat plate that gives maximum contrast, but the principle is sound with respect to the human body. There are high points and low points that need to be supported, and adaptive cushioning seems a great solution. If you don't like the egg test, the science page shows some different visuals.

This test does demonstrate why traditional mattresses don't really accomplish what they intend to, and shows that the purple mattress does appear to work better. Of course it seems to me you can't really be sure without trying one out yourself.

That's the rub. The traditional mattress store model may lead to price increases at each step of the process, but it does allow you to try before you by. Purple's model seems to be the buy so you can try model.

Now they do offer a 100 night guarantee, whereby if you don't like it you can return it at no charge. They pay shipping. That at least takes some of the sting out of the potential for buyer's remorse.

They also address one other problem of traditional mattresses - the propensity to degrade over time and become saggy. They claim they don't have that problem. Of course the egg test does nothing to address that claim.

In summary, the egg test appears to be a highly dramatic demonstration of a key failing in traditional mattresses and how Purple attempts to provide a superior performance.

Folly 06-22-2016 08:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Irishman (Post 19425553)

Bodies aren't flat. They don't sit flat against anything. On your back, you have the curves of the spine and neck. On your side, you have your shoulders and hips versus the torso. In each case, trying to lie on a flat surface causes discomfort that leads to chronic pain.

Right... thus the part about the bits of person that sink in vs the bits that don't. And as you say, the parts that don't sink in as much aren't flat and don't take up the entire rest of the mattress. Does this mattress work great to evenly distribute pressure? Maybe, but since they aren't simulating a body, the demonstration is just flashy without proving anything.

The rest of your post sounds like a commercial. Are you affiliated with this company?

spamforbrains 06-22-2016 08:15 PM

I dropped an entire bowlful of raw eggs on the carpet the other day, and not one broke. Eggs are pretty sturdy unless you apply specific pressure to one point. I have doubts that any egg dropped on any mattress would break.

Kedikat 06-22-2016 08:21 PM

Irishman related a lot of the best points.

People have different body shapes, weights and sleeping styles.
I myself am pretty bony. But I like to go to sleep on my side. I have a very firm mattress, so I got a memory foam layer on top of it. That relieves the pressure points. But does allow my waist to sag down and make some discomfort in the small of my back. A person with a thicker midsection would probably find my mattress just right. I will fine tune the mattress with an additional foam layer.
I think it is best to start with a firm mattress and then add to it from all the available top layer foam solutions. That way you don't wear out the mattress. Especially if you are a heavier person. Also, less or no spring noise and disturbance of a person with you.

Though I like to go to sleep on my side, I usually wake up quite relaxed on my back. Most people change positions many times during the night. I do it a LOT. Maybe due to trying to be on my side and not comfortable.

When testing a mattress, be sure to really, really, relax in the position you "think" you like to sleep in. It can be difficult. You will likely tense just a bit here and there to account for your unsupported parts. That will fool you into thinking it fits. Especially if you already have a bad one for you. You will be trained to fit, so one that is just marginally better, might feel a lot better. Wait a while as you relax and really sag onto and into that mattress. Particularly note the base area of your spine, small of your back. If on your side, it should be horizontally straight. No twisting. If on your back, it should be supported upward a bit. Not sagging into the mattress. We usually curve back to front at the bottom of the spine, then front to back in the top half or so.
If you are on your front. That is weird. Maybe sleep on a massage table with that face hole in it.

Kedikat 06-22-2016 08:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by spamforbrains (Post 19425690)
I dropped an entire bowlful of raw eggs on the carpet the other day, and not one broke. Eggs are pretty sturdy unless you apply specific pressure to one point. I have doubts that any egg dropped on any mattress would break.

Makes me want to comment something about, female fertility, breaking eggs, rough sex, on the wrong bed. And maybe not spilling the wine with the bowling ball, during the whole adventure.

Dewey Finn 06-22-2016 08:32 PM

Purple looks like the latest of several companies that sell solid foam mattresses (i.e., ones without springs) online. (Casper, Keetsa, Leesa, Tuft & Needle, and Yogabed are some of the others.) These companies fold and squish the mattress into a box about the size of a washing machine and send it to you by UPS or Fedex. You unbox the mattress and lay it out, and it gradually reinflates. Mostly, these companies don't have retail stores where you can try out the product but they do, allow you to return the mattress within a few months if you don't like it.

RivkahChaya 06-22-2016 08:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Haldurson (Post 19424544)
Based on what I understand about beds, just find any inexpensive bed and mattress combination that feels comfortable to you (some people can get by with a simple mattress on a hardwood floor). If you have special medical needs (like my mom did) then it might be worth going into the premium price range. But don't start looking for a bed that can cure ailments that you don't actually have.

I learned through experience that there is actually a big difference between a $50 mattress and a $250 mattress, but I bet you get diminishing returns the more you spend, and unless you have arthritis, or want to pay for a heated mattress, because you live alone, and want to turn the house heat down to 50'F at night (my grandmother for the last ten years she lived in her house with just a cat in Westchester Co.) I would never pay $1000 for a mattress unless it was meant to fit an adjustable bed, or something.

That $50 (it was $95 or something, on clearance) mattress sucked. We bought it new, and after one year, it had a big divot in the middle. We bought foam padding, and folded it creatively under the mattress, and got it to limp on for about 16 more months. The $250 mattress is holding up great after 2.5 years, so far. It still sleeps like new.

Kedikat 06-22-2016 08:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RivkahChaya (Post 19425745)
I learned through experience that there is actually a big difference between a $50 mattress and a $250 mattress, but I bet you get diminishing returns the more you spend, and unless you have arthritis, or want to pay for a heated mattress, because you live alone, and want to turn the house heat down to 50'F at night (my grandmother for the last ten years she lived in her house with just a cat in Westchester Co.) I would never pay $1000 for a mattress unless it was meant to fit an adjustable bed, or something.

That $50 (it was $95 or something, on clearance) mattress sucked. We bought it new, and after one year, it had a big divot in the middle. We bought foam padding, and folded it creatively under the mattress, and got it to limp on for about 16 more months. The $250 mattress is holding up great after 2.5 years, so far. It still sleeps like new.

That's why I mentioned starting with a firm mattress. So you are not flexing the springs much. Or, an all foam, firm base mattress. Foam can degrade over time with lots of flexing. Tune up a firm base, with foam layer tops that can be replaced, added, subtracted.

muldoonthief 06-23-2016 08:12 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by spamforbrains (Post 19425690)
I dropped an entire bowlful of raw eggs on the carpet the other day, and not one broke. Eggs are pretty sturdy unless you apply specific pressure to one point. I have doubts that any egg dropped on any mattress would break.

If you watch the video, they dropped 4 eggs with a 300 lb. sheet of glass on top of them. None of the eggs broke. I humbly submit that had you dropped something that weighed 300 lbs on top of the bowlful of eggs, they probably would have broken.

ETA: Not that I'm claiming the test shows anything useful about the quality of sleep you'd have on that mattress.

Anaamika 06-23-2016 08:16 AM

Yes, having been poor, really cheap mattresses suck. I spent a few hundred dollars on mine, some years ago. It seems to have been worth it. I did get a very firm one, as I said. I like the idea of adding memory foam on top, I might try that.

RivkahChaya 06-23-2016 08:35 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by muldoonthief (Post 19426651)
If you watch the video, they dropped 4 eggs with a 300 lb. sheet of glass on top of them. None of the eggs broke. I humbly submit that had you dropped something that weighed 300 lbs on top of the bowlful of eggs, they probably would have broken.

Heck, the bowl would break.

Quote:

ETA: Not that I'm claiming the test shows anything useful about the quality of sleep you'd have on that mattress.
They're kind of like all those ghosthunters and what have you using instruments that detect heat changes and infrared light, and all sorts of things, and they register stuff, which makes the ghosthunters get all excited, but absolutely none of those things have been independently verified to indicate the presence of ghosts.

Haldurson 06-23-2016 08:57 PM

In any case, you should never buy a mattress without testing it out yourself (and I don' t mean that you should drop eggs on it, but that you should lie down on it). That seems like common sense to me. Yes, you can always try to return it, but, do you really want to go through the time and trouble to return a mattress because you don't like how it feels, when all you really had to do is to try it out in a store? At worst, you could check out Consumer reports -- they do their own tests, and I doubt that eggs ever enter into them... unless they are actually rating eggs.

From CR: in addition to ratings, they have an article comparing the three major types of mattresses (Inner Spring, Memory Foam, and Adjustable Air) and go over some mattress-related myths. I don't see Purple being one of the mattresses that they've actually looked at, which might be because it is too new. Or maybe it's just not popular enough.

(Note that I'm not sure if that article I linked is for subscribers only, but some of their content can be accessed without a subscription)

I did check Amazon for reviews, and they are, on average, positive. But remember that reviews are not about which product is better, or the better value, but about whether a person has a positive experience. And you also have to take into account that the more expensive something is, the more likely their experience will be affected by their high expectations. It's just like the fact that if a wine has an expensive label on it, it will tend to taste better to a lot of people, but may not actually be any different than the same wine in a cheaper bottle.

One common complaint about it is that it seems (to some) to be specifically designed for people who sleep on their backs. There were complaints that the mattress was lumpy and uneven. And so on. You can check them yourself. I'd be suspicious though of reviews at some dedicated 'bed' or 'sleep' websites.

spamforbrains 06-23-2016 09:27 PM

Quote:

I humbly submit that had you dropped something that weighed 300 lbs on top of the bowlful of eggs, they probably would have broken.
I don't happen to have a 300 lb sheet of glass lying around to test this theory, but I suspect they wouldn't have. If it had a uniform flat surface and they had a soft, giving surface under them, I don't think they would break. In order to break an egg you generally have to apply a sharp sudden pressure at one point, such as whacking them against a sharp corner. Eggs are surprisingly sturdy.
If I come across a 300 lb sheet of glass I'll try it out.

muldoonthief 06-24-2016 08:17 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by spamforbrains (Post 19428825)
I don't happen to have a 300 lb sheet of glass lying around to test this theory, but I suspect they wouldn't have. If it had a uniform flat surface and they had a soft, giving surface under them, I don't think they would break. In order to break an egg you generally have to apply a sharp sudden pressure at one point, such as whacking them against a sharp corner. Eggs are surprisingly sturdy.
If I come across a 300 lb sheet of glass I'll try it out.

Is your carpeted floor as soft and giving as a mattress? The whole reason the test works in the video is that the mattress has enough give that the egg is completely engulfed in it before the glass sheet is decelerated by the mattress. Unless your carpet is deep enough that an entire egg could be submerged in it, I'd guess the 300 lb weight would break it, especially since it would be a hard surface (the glass) against the egg.

Try dropping a bowlful of eggs onto a wooden or tile floor. Some or all of them will break.

Haldurson 06-26-2016 12:18 PM

What does that test have to do with having a comfortable sleep? Even if my bed passes the test, and your bed doesn't, where have they demonstrated that my bed is more comfortable than your bed? Or that it will last longer? Or that it is better for you? Or that you will have a more restful sleep?

What if I advertised a car and I spoke about an egg test, where I dropped eggs onto the car seats from the height of the roof of the car without them breaking, and then implied that my car was safer because of that?

Irishman 07-11-2016 01:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Folly (Post 19425684)
Right... thus the part about the bits of person that sink in vs the bits that don't. And as you say, the parts that don't sink in as much aren't flat and don't take up the entire rest of the mattress. Does this mattress work great to evenly distribute pressure? Maybe, but since they aren't simulating a body, the demonstration is just flashy without proving anything.

It is not necessary for parts to take up the whole rest of the mattress. You may be right that a smaller plate of glass that did not spread over so large an area might put more pressure on the eggs, say a 1 ft by 1 ft by 6 inch object. Or something.

To me, that test demonstrates the ability for the mattress to allow pressure points to sink without increasing the pressure on them, and still provide full support to the raised areas.

Of course, does that actually provide for a more comfortable sleep? I think it would, but I don't know that this mattress actually accomplishes it.

Quote:

The rest of your post sounds like a commercial. Are you affiliated with this company?
No, I'm just someone with sleep problems who has lamented the problem of finding a comfortable bed on many an occassion. That commercial precisely addresses one major item I've identified for myself.

Quote:

Originally Posted by spamforbrains (Post 19425690)
I dropped an entire bowlful of raw eggs on the carpet the other day, and not one broke. Eggs are pretty sturdy unless you apply specific pressure to one point. I have doubts that any egg dropped on any mattress would break.

Quote:

Originally Posted by spamforbrains (Post 19428825)
I don't happen to have a 300 lb sheet of glass lying around to test this theory, but I suspect they wouldn't have. If it had a uniform flat surface and they had a soft, giving surface under them, I don't think they would break. In order to break an egg you generally have to apply a sharp sudden pressure at one point, such as whacking them against a sharp corner. Eggs are surprisingly sturdy.
If I come across a 300 lb sheet of glass I'll try it out.

I guess you didn't watch the video where they did that test for you and showed the eggs breaking on other mattresses. Or maybe you just think they faked it, one way or the other.

Oh, and while eggs might be surprisingly sturdy, I have managed to break them with my grip, and I'm not exactly popeye. Not a sudden pressure.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Haldurson (Post 19434535)
What does that test have to do with having a comfortable sleep? Even if my bed passes the test, and your bed doesn't, where have they demonstrated that my bed is more comfortable than your bed? Or that it will last longer? Or that it is better for you? Or that you will have a more restful sleep?

The connection with comfortable sleep is maintaining your body in a neutral position and fully supported without pressure points. Lying on your side and having your waist sag curves your spine and gives backaches. Lying on your back with your knees flat is highly uncomfortable as it strains the lower back. Most mattresses do a poor job of solving that problem, despite variations of coil springs, foam, padding, and even air inflation or water inflation.

Quote:

what if I advertised a car and I spoke about an egg test, where I dropped eggs onto the car seats from the height of the roof of the car without them breaking, and then implied that my car was safer because of that?
Do you provide a theoretical description of how it provides safety? Because that website has a good description of how that test demonstrates the conflicting needs of a soft giving upper layer to allow the low points to sink in without too much pressure but simultaneously a stiff upper layer to support the high points.

Your shoulder and hips need to sink in while your ribs and waist get supported.

Jawmaster 12-30-2016 12:17 AM

It's a parlor trick.
 
I used to work as a mattress designer, and I can tell you that improvised tests like these should be taken with a grain of salt.

The reason the eggs don't break is very simple: The top layer is a thin-walled grid -- individual walls can buckle easily under concentrated loads, but buckling several walls over a wider area takes much more force.

The egg has a very small cross-section, so it buckles individual grid walls easily. The glass plate above, on the other hand, has a high surface area, so it does not sink in as easily as the egg.

It's a neat parlor trick and clever marketing. But as other folks in this thread have stated, an egg is fundamentally different from a human user:
1) Eggs have a hard, brittle exterior. Humans have a soft tissue exterior. Soft tissues change shape and spread out over a wide area under pressure, while egg shells on the other hand resist shape changes.
2) Eggs - much smaller than humans, much less surface area. Human features are generally less "pointy" - sleepers have much more in common with the test's glass pane than the egg.

Also, I see a few critical flaws in this bed's design:
1) As a whole, the grid doesn't provide much surface area for a user's body, compared to traditional solid foam. If you were to map body pressure, you would likely see that pressure concentrates on the top of each grid wall, spiking at the grid intersections. Nonuniform pressure distributions like this can lead to severe discomfort and pressure sores over time.
2) None of the layers appear to have any "zoning". So it's very unlikely that the lower back will have more support compared to the hips and shoulders, which can lead to back pain over time. This can also lead to an unbalanced sleeping position that concentrates pressure in either the shoulders or hips.
3) The "hyperelastic polymer" doesn't breathe well, trapping heat. Memory foam has a similar problem.
4) 2" is woefully thin for a top layer. Some Amazon reviewers commented that they had difficulty with side sleeping -- it's because the grid is "bottoming out" against the firmer foam layer underneath.

Sadly, mainstream mattress companies make these kinds of design mistakes ALL THE TIME -- the recurring theme is that mattresses are 1% hard science, 99% marketing spin. And guess which category Purple's "test" falls into... :mad::smack:

Dr_Paprika 12-30-2016 12:33 AM

I don't know many mattress designers. I suspect hype and marketing play a large role in any non-intuitive test, but am curious what a well designed mattress would look like, if any exist, etc. I usually buy moderately expensive mattresses on sale from well established brands, and have always slept well. The fact the companies make different models hard to compare tells you they are often overpriced.

Jawmaster 12-30-2016 01:37 AM

Good question.
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Dr_Paprika (Post 19885580)
I don't know many mattress designers. I suspect hype and marketing play a large role in any non-intuitive test, but am curious what a well designed mattress would look like, if any exist, etc. I usually buy moderately expensive mattresses on sale from well established brands, and have always slept well. The fact the companies make different models hard to compare tells you they are often overpriced.

Here are characteristics I would avoid in a mattress:
1) Memory foam. It gets hot, it doesn't breathe, and it can be hard as a brick during winter.
2) Textured/convoluted top layers. More often than not, textures/convolutes create uncomfortable pressure points.
3) Perforated top layers. Perforations are often marketed as a cooling feature, but their efficacy is minimal compared to active fan-based cooling systems.
4) Gel/PCM additives. Contrary to marketing spin, these gimmicks do not do a great job of keeping you cool. They might feel cool at first, but then they tend to get really hot after several minutes.
5) COIL SPRINGS. These are the worst. They create very bad pressure points, and are notoriously prone to sagging over time. And don't be fooled by hybrid beds offering foam on top of springs -- they're plagued by the same problems.

Here are some characteristics I would look for in a mattress:
1) Active airflow, driven by fans. I believe Sleep Number offers this feature, but it's a pricy option that is subject to mechanical failure. Next best thing is a high-porosity top layer of foam - and by that, I mean CONVENTIONAL foam, not memory foam. Latex foam is okay, but still traps some heat.
2) User-variable firmness. Again, Sleep Number.
3) Zones of varying firmness (firmer for the lower back, softer for shoulders/hips). Would be awesome to find a bed that combined this feature with Feature 2 above.
4) Thermally-conductive fibers. These are relatively new, but could help to radiate heat away from your body.
5) Active body contouring. This one is tricky...mattresses are generally sold as flat rectangular affairs, which is why memory foam is commonly used for passive body contouring. Active body contouring is currently limited to adjustable beds that recline and raise your legs, without really shaping the sleep surface around your body.
Perhaps in a few decades, I would expect to see active body contouring mechanisms that outperform memory foam...I'm imagining a sleep surface comprised entirely of nano-scale robots that hug your body like a vat of gel. I'm grinning just thinking about it. :D

Darren Garrison 12-30-2016 07:39 AM

I've long been annoyed by the mattress commercials claiming that a mattress needs to be replaced every 8 years because it doubles its weight every 8 years (from sweat, dead skin, and dead dust mites) which is clearly drivel. I googled, and there is a Dope for that.


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