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-   -   Music that scares the crap out of you (http://boards.straightdope.com/sdmb/showthread.php?t=820012)

JoseB 02-24-2017 05:43 PM

Music that scares the crap out of you
 
Scary music. There are songs and compositions that, either by design or by sheer happenstance, inspire pure terror and fear. They have a "pucker factor" that cranks up to 11.

What pieces have that effect on you? Share them here, so that all of us have a chance to experience existential discomfort and dread!

I will be the first to share a composition that terrifies the bejeezus out of me: "Threnody for the victims of Hiroshima", by Penderecki. Hell in the form of sound, using nothing but strings.

Enjoy! (For certain values of "enjoy", that is). Here is the link:

https://youtu.be/abv0YNm8FeY

gigi 02-24-2017 05:57 PM

I don't know about scares, but what creeps me out is that circus music

http://www.orangefreesounds.com/circus-music/

:eek:

Dendarii Dame 02-24-2017 06:52 PM

There Once Was a Woman All Skin and Bones

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lOhYGxg460k

Trinopus 02-24-2017 07:31 PM

The choral version of Mussorgsky's "Night on Bald Mountain." The instrumental version is spooky enough, but the choral version is a witches' orgy from hell!

Colibri 02-24-2017 07:39 PM

I've always been partial to the opening ballad of Sweeney Todd (original Broadway version), which is marvelously menacing.

SaharaTea 02-24-2017 07:51 PM

My dad was a big fan of Verdi's Requiem, and "Dies Irae" scared the crap out of me as a kid. Still does.

Saintly Loser 02-24-2017 10:18 PM

Gyorgy Ligeti's Atmospheres. You've probably heard it, even if you don't recognize the name, or the composer's name. It's used in 2001: A Space Odyssey, in the scene where they investigate the monolith on the moon.

I was a kid (teenager) when I saw that movie, but I was fascinated by that music. I eventually found out what it was, and that led to a lifelong love of Ligeti's music.

Kubrick used Ligeti's music again in Eyes Wide Shut. That two-note piano music is the second movement of Ligeti's Musica Ricercata. It's pretty creepy.

RivkahChaya 02-24-2017 10:28 PM

The theme to Psycho.

Also, the sound track to Koyaanisqatsi is disturbing, but somehow in a good way.

blondebear 02-24-2017 10:28 PM

Black Sabbath

Quote:

What is this that stands before me?
Figure in black which points at me
Turn around quick, and start to run
Find out I'm the chosen one
Oh no


RivkahChaya 02-24-2017 10:37 PM

I used to interpret in churches a lot. Once in a while there was a hymn that would creep me out. There was one where they kept singing about being "Washed in the blood of the lamb," and another one with a different verse about each of Jesus' wounds, and it got really specific. Then there was one where the chorus was the Jews saying "His blood be on us and our children." I got really uncomfortable during that one.

El_Kabong 02-24-2017 10:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Saintly Loser (Post 20025053)
Gyorgy Ligeti's Atmospheres. You've probably heard it, even if you don't recognize the name, or the composer's name. It's used in 2001: A Space Odyssey, in the scene where they investigate the monolith on the moon.

I was a kid (teenager) when I saw that movie, but I was fascinated by that music. I eventually found out what it was, and that led to a lifelong love of Ligeti's music.

Kubrick used Ligeti's music again in Eyes Wide Shut. That two-note piano music is the second movement of Ligeti's Musica Ricercata. It's pretty creepy.

The one that gets me from that film is another Ligeti piece, "Requiem for Soprano, Mezzo Soprano, Two Mixed Choirs & Orchestra". It was also used during the HALO jump sequence in the 2014 Godzilla film.

The Beatles "Being For the Benefit of Mr. Kite" always gave me the willies, for some reason.

nearwildheaven 02-24-2017 10:47 PM

Maybe "scares the crap out of you" isn't the right phrase, but Nirvana's "Nevermind" has always creeped me out, from start to finish.

:confused:

ruadh 02-25-2017 05:58 AM

Throbbing Gristle's "Hamburger Lady". Don't go there if you don't have to. Trust me on this.

ZonexandScout 02-25-2017 08:42 AM

The score from Donnie Darko, especially "For Whom the Bell Tolls," does it for me.

WordMan 02-25-2017 09:07 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JoseB (Post 20024645)
I will be the first to share a composition that terrifies the bejeezus out of me: "Threnody for the victims of Hiroshima", by Penderecki. Hell in the form of sound, using nothing but strings.

Enjoy! (For certain values of "enjoy", that is). Here is the link:

https://youtu.be/abv0YNm8FeY

Good god yes. I heard it first in college and just freaked. When I was told that Penderecki was trying to evoke the feelings of skin blistering off in an a-bomb attack, I was like "yeah, that sounds about right."

When it comes to rock songs, it's funny - Peter Gabriel has a song called The Intruder off PG3. It's about what it sounds like: a guy breaking into a woman's room and preparing to rob and assault her. It's creepy with a great scary feel - and I can listen to it just fine. I mean, it's Peter Gabriel, known good guy and assumer of roles in his songs, so I can keep it at arm's length.

But the song by The Toadies, Possum Kingdom, freaks me right out. It's another song written from the criminal's perspective, a rapist/killer seducing his prey with promises and lies. I love the groove - the non-4/4 time keeps it off balance, and it just rocks overall - but I can't listen to it anymore.

And the video - ugh: https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=EkwD5rQ-_d4

K364 02-25-2017 09:21 AM

The Beatles Revolution 9

Shoeless 02-25-2017 12:25 PM

Tom Waits' cover of "Heigh-Ho (The Dwarfs Marching Song)"

Wesley Clark 02-25-2017 12:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JoseB (Post 20024645)
Scary music. There are songs and compositions that, either by design or by sheer happenstance, inspire pure terror and fear. They have a "pucker factor" that cranks up to 11.

What pieces have that effect on you? Share them here, so that all of us have a chance to experience existential discomfort and dread!

I will be the first to share a composition that terrifies the bejeezus out of me: "Threnody for the victims of Hiroshima", by Penderecki. Hell in the form of sound, using nothing but strings.

Enjoy! (For certain values of "enjoy", that is). Here is the link:

https://youtu.be/abv0YNm8FeY

This is actually a bit unnerving. I don't know if it is because it reminds me of the Shining, or just because there is something about this particular type of music that is unsettling and that is why the Shining used it.

Looking into it, the composer did most of the music for the shining. Ah.

Quote:

Originally Posted by ruadh (Post 20025459)
Throbbing Gristle's "Hamburger Lady". Don't go there if you don't have to. Trust me on this.

Eh. I just listened, it sounded like someone mumbling while I played Excite bike on NES and had a fan running.

ZPG Zealot 02-25-2017 02:29 PM

Dueling banjos

pulykamell 02-25-2017 02:33 PM

Xiu Xiu's entire "A Promise" album. It just sounds like the sonic equivalent of descending into madness. The entire album just creeps me out--I mean, I like it, but it's just a very stressful listen, with instrumental minimalism, punctuated by brutally glitchy-machine like beats, and a wavering, emotive vocal that sounds like someone on the verge of a nervous breakdown. Here's one track, "Apistat Commander."

Hermione 02-25-2017 02:54 PM

I wouldn't say "scared the crap out of me", but it WAS unsettling...the "Lament" on the original 1976 concept album of Evita (with Julie Covington and "C.T.", later "Colm" Wilkinson).

This was the first version of the show I ever heard, following along with it in a published version of the London script with historical notes. (The London script, with a handful of exceptions, followed the original concept album pretty faithfully.)

The "Lament" is the last song in the album/show. Future staged versions have shortened it by about one verse and altered its ending, tacking on a short speech by Che about the fate of Eva's corpse. But the version on the original concept album is very eerie indeed. Eva sings about the choices she made in life and her justification for them--would she have lived longer if she'd chosen an ordinary life?* Between the two verses there's a mournful quote of her "ambition" theme on the flute. Then, after her last words, there's a quiet brass phrase of "Don't Cry for Me, Argentina" to symbolize her last breaths...a slight pause...and then the morticians, their voices echoing eerily, move in to begin preserving Eva's body, singing a refrain to the same music Eva had been beautified to in "Rainbow High." And silence. No huge "button". No big finale. Just those ghoulish voices fading into silence.

The second time I listened to the album, I made the mistake of listening to that song at night with the lights off...and got a few chills. Nevertheless, I still think it's the most effective version of the Evita finale I've ever heard, far more so than the staged version.

*A side note...I always scratched my head at the idea that Eva may have lived longer if she hadn't chased after fame. If she was going to get cancer, wouldn't she have gotten it even if she'd stayed in Junin all her life and married Pedro the tailor? She might even have died earlier due to poorer conditions, worse medical care, and a body weakened by a harder life.

motu 02-25-2017 03:48 PM

Kecak, the Ramayana Monkey Chant

Folkways Music of the Gods Kecak

Scared the jeebus outta me first time i listened to Music of the Gods, all this wonderful mellow instrumental gamelan and all of the sudden... A group of people is chanting at me. LOUDLY. At me! Very jarring musical transition.

Ranchoth 02-25-2017 10:50 PM

Well, this one's a bit tricky for me, as my personal "scare the crap out of you" standards seem to be a mite skewed, compared to other people.

I do have one, though, that I found by accident...or rather, created by accident.

I was messing around with a sound editor program one time, testing out some of the various filter features, using a random mp3 I had handy.

It turns out if you slow it down by about three times, and lower the pitch by about 500%...the Horst Wessel Lied sounds REALLY, terribly unsettling. (Moreso, anyway) Like the dead moan of an army of the damned—it immediately brought to mind Wayne Barlowe's "The Wargate" from his Inferno.

I really outta remember put that on YouTube, sometime.

buddha_david 02-25-2017 11:23 PM

Thirty years ago, listening to the world's first black metal album made me want to cower under a table. Still kinda has that effect nowadays.

Brown Eyed Girl 02-26-2017 12:27 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JoseB (Post 20024645)
I will be the first to share a composition that terrifies the bejeezus out of me: "Threnody for the victims of Hiroshima", by Penderecki. Hell in the form of sound, using nothing but strings.

Enjoy! (For certain values of "enjoy", that is). Here is the link:

https://youtu.be/abv0YNm8FeY

What in the everloving fuck was that?! :eek::eek::eek::eek:

movingfinger 02-26-2017 12:46 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by motu (Post 20026420)
Kecak, the Ramayana Monkey Chant

Folkways Music of the Gods Kecak

Scared the jeebus outta me first time i listened to Music of the Gods, all this wonderful mellow instrumental gamelan and all of the sudden... A group of people is chanting at me. LOUDLY. At me! Very jarring musical transition.

Thank you! I heard this a good thirty years ago on a program on KCET and was blown away with it. All I could recall was something about "Monkey dance",but the title was not known to me. Thanks!

JoseB 02-26-2017 02:11 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Brown Eyed Girl (Post 20027251)

Quote:

Originally Posted by JoseB (Post 20024645)
I will be the first to share a composition that terrifies the bejeezus out of me: "Threnody for the victims of Hiroshima", by Penderecki. Hell in the form of sound, using nothing but strings.

Enjoy! (For certain values of "enjoy", that is). Here is the link:

https://youtu.be/abv0YNm8FeY

What in the everloving fuck was that?! :eek::eek::eek::eek:

Screaming, terror and death in the face of fiery, incomprehensible annihilation. Expressed purely by means of a string soundscape.

Interestingly, the author intended this piece to be "just" an experiment in sound clusters and soundscapes, but later, when he actually heard it played by an ensamble, he was so overwhelmed by the emotional impact of what he had written that he gave it its current title.

nachtmusick 02-26-2017 04:28 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JoseB (Post 20027318)
Screaming, terror and death in the face of fiery, incomprehensible annihilation. Expressed purely by means of a string soundscape.

Interestingly, the author intended this piece to be "just" an experiment in sound clusters and soundscapes, but later, when he actually heard it played by an ensamble, he was so overwhelmed by the emotional impact of what he had written that he gave it its current title.

So now I finally know what H.P. Lovecraft was imagining when he wrote "The Music of Erich Zann" in 1921:

It would be useless to describe the playing of Erich Zann on that dreadful night. It was more horrible than anything I had ever overheard, because I could now see the expression of his face, and could realize that this time the motive was stark fear. He was trying to make a noise; to ward something off or drown something out—what, I could not imagine, awesome though I felt it must be.

Guest-starring: Id! 02-26-2017 12:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by WordMan (Post 20025660)
"When it comes to rock songs, it's funny - Peter Gabriel has a song called The Intruder off PG3. It's about what it sounds like: a guy breaking into a woman's room and preparing to rob and assault her. It's creepy with a great scary feel - and I can listen to it just fine. I mean, it's Peter Gabriel, known good guy and assumer of roles in his songs, so I can keep it at arm's length.

Came here to mention that one. Always liked how it kicks off with that primal percussion (wouldn't be least surprised if early Buttholes sampled it), and then the weird scraping sound, (ultra slow pick-scrape with effects?) (like trying to simulate a creaking door, or something being opened), and then that awesomely atonal guitar chord.

also:

Arthur Honegger's Pacific 231 has always filled me with a blood-curdling sense of evil empowerment, reigning down on all to suffer. Actually I like how this piece builds ominous momentum like a locomotive very gradually building up full steam ahead. There's parts in this that made me wonder if it might have been at least some inspiration for Raymond Scott's "Powerhouse", which came out only 14 years later, in 1937.
The fun starts around 1:55.

For listening to something that would sound good if you were by yourself in a very old, large, unfamiliar house in the middle of the woods at night with all the lights off, I'd highly recommend Bartok's (so much to choose from!) Adagio.
Best appreciated cranked, with as little external sounds as possible. [Hopefully you can weather out the (I thought) overly-long near-silent passages, to get to the good shit.] At 2:44 should be verrrrrry familiar:p and awesome nightmarish flourish building at 3:44. Couldn't ask for a more perfect visual, too, to vege out on, for this.
Heh and speaking of another possible influence for Powerhouse (which btw, came out only a year after 231), check out 4:42 - 4:47.

Normally not considered a scary number, Leaning on Everlasting Arms most definitely is, in this instance .
If I ever hear it again (anywhere else - doubtful) I sure won't be all kumbaya about it.

Guest-starring: Id! 02-26-2017 12:53 PM

Missed edit window.

:smack:hmmmm how about I provide a link for Adagio

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sabfO_vrC9I

jayjay 02-26-2017 02:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JoseB (Post 20024645)
I will be the first to share a composition that terrifies the bejeezus out of me: "Threnody for the victims of Hiroshima", by Penderecki. Hell in the form of sound, using nothing but strings.

Enjoy! (For certain values of "enjoy", that is). Here is the link:

https://youtu.be/abv0YNm8FeY

This. Absolutely. When the instructor played this for an Intro To Music History class, it was possibly the single most disturbing piece of instrumental music I'd ever heard and still is.

Biggirl 02-26-2017 02:10 PM

I've mentioned this before but the late, late show (which was almost always a scary movie) used The Syncopated Clock as its theme and that music still sends shivers down my spine when I hear it. How is that for random?

Not so random, Tubular Bells.

Guest-starring: Id! 02-26-2017 04:03 PM

Another familiar thingy, this time at the 4-minute mark of Mussorgsky's Pictures At An Exhibition

rowrrbazzle 02-26-2017 10:34 PM

Liszt's Totentanz ("Dance of Death") a "paraphrase" of the chant "Dies Irae" is pretty harrowing. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nbEvKFqLLZs

Ranchoth 02-26-2017 11:14 PM

Ah! You know, come to think of it, there is ONE song that always scared me, if just as a very little kid.

Manhattan Transfer's "Twilight Zone."

I chalk it up to the creepy sound effects, that almost archetypal guitar riff, and the fact that I first heard it when I went with my family to check out a house we were considering buying/renting. A rather isolated, lonely old two story place hidden in the thick of a Northern California redwood forest.

And that may have been haunted, stemming from a previous resident committing suicide after going insane one night, running outside, and throwing himself in front of a truck traveling along the winding country road that passed nearby.

:eek:


P.S.: I am really, really surprised that Diamanda Galas hasn't shown up in this thread, yet.

Penfeather 02-26-2017 11:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Shoeless (Post 20026048)

That one's on my Favourites playlist.

Seanette 02-27-2017 12:06 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by K364 (Post 20025686)
The Beatles Revolution 9

I went through a phase of finding most of the White Album seriously creepy. This came shortly after I read "Helter Skelter" for the first time at age 12, right around the time my mother and I moved to a quite isolated house.

Les Espaces Du Sommeil 02-27-2017 06:11 AM

I'll second Ligeti's Requiem, which is, to me, the sound of pure metaphysical terror from start to finish. Well, there might be some fragile glimmer of... not hope but dead-eyed acceptance towards the very end perhaps. A terrific piece that packs quite a punch and isn't that difficult to follow as far as post WWII classical music goes.

My second choice is Scriabin's Piano Sonata No. 6, especially that recurring motif, appearing first here between 0:27 and 0:32. That's the music of nightmares. When I hear it, I always picture someone's face melting, or a mask slipping slowly to reveal a disfigured face. As a matter of fact, it seems that Scriabin himself, ever the weirdo, was terrified of it:

The mood of the piece is marked "mystérieux" by the composer, but most striking are the sudden moments of horror that interrupt its dreamlike atmosphere, explicitly marked "l'épouvante surgit" (surge of terror) by Scriabin...

According to Scriabin's biographer, Faubion Bowers, “The Sixth Sonata is a netherstar. Its dark and evil aspect embraces horror, terror, and the omnipresent Unknown. ‘Only my music expresses the inexpressible,’ Scriabin boasted, and called the Sixth’s sweet and harsh harmonies, “nightmarish… fuliginous… murky… dark and hidden… unclean… mischievous.’ When he played excerpts for friends, he would stare off in the distance away from the piano, as if watching effluvium rise from the floor and walls around him. He seemed frightened and sometimes shuddered.


His Poème-Nocturne is really creepy, too, especially the passages marked "comme une ombre mouvante" (like a moving shadow). It's like catching a glimpse of a ghost from the corner of your eye.

Guest-starring: Id! 02-27-2017 09:45 AM

Again, perhaps not the most terrifying visuals (maybe just go to a different screen - heh, all black! - while listening to this)

Ginestera - Danza del gauncho metrero

Marvin the Martian 02-27-2017 11:35 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by El_Kabong (Post 20025096)
The one that gets me from that film is another Ligeti piece, "Requiem for Soprano, Mezzo Soprano, Two Mixed Choirs & Orchestra".

Came here to post this. When I was a teenager we set up a haunted house (in my parent's house) for Halloween, and I was in charge of the music and used this piece (alternating with Atmospheres). Basically kids would walk up, shout "Trick or treat", and be confronted with a darkened doorway (lit by black lights) with this music blaring. We had so many kids just scream and run off without even coming inside. Hilarious. Ended up having to switch to "Monster Mash" after about 15 minutes of this.

gigi 02-27-2017 12:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RivkahChaya (Post 20025095)
I used to interpret in churches a lot. Once in a while there was a hymn that would creep me out. There was one where they kept singing about being "Washed in the blood of the lamb," and another one with a different verse about each of Jesus' wounds, and it got really specific. Then there was one where the chorus was the Jews saying "His blood be on us and our children." I got really uncomfortable during that one.

Then there's the verse of We Three Kings, during the happy Christmas season:

Myrrh is mine, its bitter perfume
Breathes of life of gathering gloom
Sorrowing, sighing, bleeding, dying
Sealed in the stone-cold tomb

It's never good when the organist stops after that verse and doesn't include:

Glorious now behold Him arise
King and God and Sacrifice
Heaven sings Alleluia
Alleluia the earth replies

TreacherousCretin 02-27-2017 03:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Eddie The Horrible (Post 20030116)
Again, perhaps not the most terrifying visuals (maybe just go to a different screen - heh, all black! - while listening to this)
Ginestera - Danza del gauncho metrero

Good pick, although I think Santiago Rodriguez recorded a more effective interpretation.

My entry is more of a cheap thrill bowels-purger:
Mahler's Symphony #1, 4th movement, the first few seconds.

blondebear 02-27-2017 03:12 PM

The first part of Tiny Tim's "The Other Side" is very dark and creepy.

Guest-starring: Id! 02-27-2017 05:02 PM

When I was a kid I thought this was both kick-butt and scary:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MgaETQh4uXg



Hilarious - like, gross hilarious - back in the 80's there was a band called Wiseblood who put out a creepy number called "Stumbo". So, I look it up on youtube, hoping to post it, and lo and behold there's a live performance of buddy singing it. Unfortunately the mulleted fuck then opens up his shirt and starts preening back and forth across the stage like Mick Jagger on bath salts, trying to stick out his chest and shimmying his butt and I'm thinking dude! fuck-off! You just de-scary-fied a (well, back then, anyway) scary song!

This means I won't be posting it.:)

nearwildheaven 02-27-2017 05:57 PM

I made it through about 30 seconds of "Threnody....." How can he even get people to play this thing in the first place?

:dubious:

Richard John Marcej 02-27-2017 06:21 PM

In 1982 I went to see the film John Carpenter's The Thing at a stand alone theater (just one screen, not a cineplex) I was early and the theater was empty and surprisingly dark. They didn't play any pre-entertainment videos on screen, they just played the soundtrack of the film.

Ennio Morricone's score is desolate and stark and has a real feeling of foreboding. It was especially jarring considering I was here to see a Carpenter film and was expecting to hear a typical Carpenter composed soundtrack dominated with synthesizers, but instead to hear this haunting score highlighted by lonely piano pieces and shrieking strings.... I'm sure it wasn't the intent of the theater, but by playing this beforehand I was really amped to see this film!

I guess I'm not the only one who really likes this soundtrack, since they lifted parts of it to play on the soundtrack of The Hateful Eight last year and it won Morricone an Oscar!

If you've never listened to this soundtrack, give it a listen

gkster 02-27-2017 07:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Hermione (Post 20026311)
Eva sings about the choices she made in life and her justification for them--would she have lived longer if she'd chosen an ordinary life?*

/snip/

*A side note...I always scratched my head at the idea that Eva may have lived longer if she hadn't chased after fame. If she was going to get cancer, wouldn't she have gotten it even if she'd stayed in Junin all her life and married Pedro the tailor? She might even have died earlier due to poorer conditions, worse medical care, and a body weakened by a harder life.

Two of Juan Peron's wives died of cervical cancer: his first wife Aurelia and Eva Peron. It's very likely that he transmitted HPV to them, causing their cancer. So it's very possible that if Eva hadn't chased Peron and fame, she could have lived a long and ordinary life.

His third wife, Isabel, did not have cervical cancer, but according to this blog,

"Crasswaller states in his work ‘Peron and the Enigmas of Argentina’ that Peron and Isabel did not share a deep emotional commitment, so perhaps sexual relations between Peron and Isabel were rare or perhaps did not exist. It is also thought women are most vulnerable to HPV in their late teens to early 20s. Aurelia is thought to have married Peron when she was between seventeen and thirty and Evita at 24. Isabel, though, married Peron when she was 30, so another likelihood is Isabel was past the age where infection happens."
https://www.historicalfictiononline....pic.php?t=6124

The Spanish wikipedia article states that Juan and Aurelia married when she was 19
https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aureli..._de_Per%C3%B3n

MrDibble 02-28-2017 03:43 AM

Einsturzende Neubauten are ordinarily quite pleasantly hardcore. Einsturzende Neubauten with Butō dancers is pants-shittingly scary.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ranchoth (Post 20029407)
P.S.: I am really, really surprised that Diamanda Galas hasn't shown up in this thread, yet.

Aaaw, I was hoping I'd be the first to mention her - specifically, the live albums, like Plague Mass...

Hermione 02-28-2017 11:15 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gkster (Post 20031719)
Two of Juan Peron's wives died of cervical cancer: his first wife Aurelia and Eva Peron. It's very likely that he transmitted HPV to them, causing their cancer. So it's very possible that if Eva hadn't chased Peron and fame, she could have lived a long and ordinary life.

His third wife, Isabel, did not have cervical cancer, but according to this blog,

"Crasswaller states in his work ‘Peron and the Enigmas of Argentina’ that Peron and Isabel did not share a deep emotional commitment, so perhaps sexual relations between Peron and Isabel were rare or perhaps did not exist. It is also thought women are most vulnerable to HPV in their late teens to early 20s. Aurelia is thought to have married Peron when she was between seventeen and thirty and Evita at 24. Isabel, though, married Peron when she was 30, so another likelihood is Isabel was past the age where infection happens."
https://www.historicalfictiononline....pic.php?t=6124

The Spanish wikipedia article states that Juan and Aurelia married when she was 19
https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aureli..._de_Per%C3%B3n

Very interesting (as was the forum post). Did not know that. Thanks very much.

TreacherousCretin 02-28-2017 11:51 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Richard John Marcej (Post 20031542)
In 1982 I went to see the film John Carpenter's The Thing at a stand alone theater (just one screen, not a cineplex) I was early and the theater was empty and surprisingly dark. They didn't play any pre-entertainment videos on screen, they just played the soundtrack of the film.

Ennio Morricone's score is desolate and stark and has a real feeling of foreboding. It was especially jarring considering I was here to see a Carpenter film and was expecting to hear a typical Carpenter composed soundtrack dominated with synthesizers, but instead to hear this haunting score highlighted by lonely piano pieces and shrieking strings.... I'm sure it wasn't the intent of the theater, but by playing this beforehand I was really amped to see this film!

I guess I'm not the only one who really likes this soundtrack, since they lifted parts of it to play on the soundtrack of The Hateful Eight last year and it won Morricone an Oscar!

If you've never listened to this soundtrack, give it a listen

This has been one of my favorite soundtracks for ages. For me, the music can be described with one word: Despair.

If you've heard only the old OST album, I strongly recommend you take a look at this:

https://www.amazon.com/JOHN-CARPENTE.../dp/B005YRBUN0


It's very good.


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