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-   -   Carr's Dictionary of Extraordinary Cricketers (http://boards.straightdope.com/sdmb/showthread.php?t=826909)

blindboyard 05-23-2017 02:17 PM

Carr's Dictionary of Extraordinary Cricketers
 
I just found a copy of this book.

Quote:

Mr H. Bagshawe, d. 1902, asked that his umpire's coat, containing six pebbles, should be his shroud.
It's the smallest book I've ever held.

Quote:

Max Beerbohm, b. 1872, a much admired Edwardian writer who subscrived a shilling to W. G. Grace's Testimonial 'not in support of cricket but as an earnest protest against golf.'
It's smaller than a sheet of toilet paper, and barely thicker.

Quote:

Richard Daft, Notts, b. 1831, was the last practitioner of the underleg stroke and the art died with him.
Just a few pages of bizarrery.

Quote:

C. B. Fry, Hants., b 1872, held the world's long-jump record, played in an F. A. Cup Final, headed the England batting averages in 6 seasons and was a notable classical scholar. At the Treaty of Versailles it was sensibly proposed that he be crowned King of Albania, a blessing denied that unhappy land which, instead, inherited a family called Zog and, later, went Maoist.
It's a very old game.

Quote:

Horace, c.1890, a horse of such exquisite sensibility that, when Fred Morley, the invariable Notts last man, left the Trent Bridge pavilion, it sidled unobtrusively toward the roller.

kenobi 65 05-23-2017 03:06 PM

Where did you find these drugs, and why aren't you sharing?

pulykamell 05-23-2017 03:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kenobi 65 (Post 20227454)
Where did you find these drugs, and why aren't you sharing?

I'm guessing this is a Mornington Crescent kind of thing.

AK84 05-23-2017 10:01 PM

Not much is bizzare, mostly amusing anecdotes, so unsure where you are coming from.

The Stafford Cripps 05-24-2017 02:28 AM

Carr's are a biscuit company, so my WAG is that this was a free gift sold with boxes of biscuits.

Cricket has been around for several centuries, but by 1890 other sports were very well established in Britain.

Quote:

Horace, c.1890, a horse of such exquisite sensibility that, when Fred Morley, the invariable Notts last man, left the Trent Bridge pavilion, it sidled unobtrusively toward the roller.
If true, this is funny. The horse clearly knew that Morley was a bad batsman, and that it would be expected to soon pull the roller to prepare the pitch for the other team's innings.

The Stafford Cripps 05-24-2017 02:37 AM

The pebbles in the umpire's coat are for counting the "overs" - every 6 balls is an over and the fielding team starts bowling from the other end.

I don't know why batsmen would have played the ball through their legs but it must have looked hilarious.

MrDibble 05-24-2017 03:30 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by The Stafford Cripps (Post 20228477)
I don't know why batsmen would have played the ball through their legs but it must have looked hilarious.

Oh, it did

AK84 05-24-2017 03:41 AM

For batsmen trying to be contortionists and look as ridiculous as possible just see Younis Khan's entire fucking career.

As collected on Tumblr http://airborneyouniskhan.tumblr.com

GuanoLad 05-24-2017 04:13 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by blindboyard (Post 20227332)
C. B. Fry, Hants., b 1872, held the world's long-jump record, played in an F. A. Cup Final, headed the England batting averages in 6 seasons and was a notable classical scholar. At the Treaty of Versailles it was sensibly proposed that he be crowned King of Albania, a blessing denied that unhappy land which, instead, inherited a family called Zog and, later, went Maoist.

Charles Burbage Fry, relative to Stephen.

Telperion 05-24-2017 08:17 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GuanoLad (Post 20228513)
Charles Burbage Fry, relative to Stephen.

So what you're saying is, there's an alternate universe where Stephen Fry is the king of Albania? I kind of want to move there now.

pulykamell 05-24-2017 09:00 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pulykamell (Post 20227459)
I'm guessing this is a Mornington Crescent kind of thing.

OK, so apparently this is a real book of some sort, but it sure as hell reads like one of those quirky British improv games.

blindboyard 05-24-2017 01:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by The Stafford Cripps (Post 20228471)
Carr's are a biscuit company, so my WAG is that this was a free gift sold with boxes of biscuits.

What manner of beast sells a free gift?

Quote:

Originally Posted by Carr's Dictionary of Extra Ordinary English Cricketers
These books hover between a greeting and a present. They fit a common envelope and go for a minimum postage. In cold bedrooms only one hand to the wrist need suffer exposure. A distinguished novelist recommends them for reading in the bath. An ambbassador, albeit an American, claims they can be palmed from the cuff during tedious speeches and profitless sermons.

R.D and J M Carr. There is a number to call 01284. Whence?

Also,
Quote:

The Revd. Francis Cornford, Vicar of Cam, c.1863, batting on Stinchcombe Ridge, Glos., made a hit yielding 18 runs. 'Lost Ball!' could not be called because at no time was the ball out of sight.
There's a mention of a man in my own town who died in a collision with his colleague while running. Also, I didn't know you could be caught when the ball had ricocheted of the batsman at the other end.

Quote:

Julius Caesar, natus Godalming, circa MLCCCXXIX, a slow bowler who, on overseas tours, wept if required to sleep alone. He later was coach at Uppingham.

pulykamell 05-25-2017 07:28 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pulykamell (Post 20228818)
OK, so apparently this is a real book of some sort, but it sure as hell reads like one of those quirky British improv games.

Or maybe it's not. I can't tell. Argh!!!!

JacobSwan 05-25-2017 07:56 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Telperion (Post 20228726)
So what you're saying is, there's an alternate universe where Stephen Fry is the king of Albania? I kind of want to move there now.

One of his relatives was also asked if he wanted to be the President of Israel when it was first founded. So there's another alternative universe in which Stephen may have followed in the family tradition. No Blackadder, no QI, but on the plus side, no Great Indoors either.

The Stafford Cripps 05-25-2017 12:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pulykamell (Post 20231049)
Or maybe it's not. I can't tell. Argh!!!!

Ok, blindboyard is making little sense, and appears unfamiliar with the concept of the "pamphlet", but the quotes themselves are fully understandable to someone who follows cricket. Which ones are you struggling with?

A pamphlet about baseball, written in an arch humorous tone 100 years ago, would probably be equally unfathomable to people who don't follow that game.

pulykamell 05-25-2017 01:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by The Stafford Cripps (Post 20231730)
Ok, blindboyard is making little sense, and appears unfamiliar with the concept of the "pamphlet", but the quotes themselves are fully understandable to someone who follows cricket. Which ones are you struggling with?

A pamphlet about baseball, written in an arch humorous tone 100 years ago, would probably be equally unfathomable to people who don't follow that game.

It's just the humorous tone and bizarre anecdotes like somebody weeping if they sleep alone. So these are joke anecdotes or are they supposed to be true facts? (Though the Julius Caesar gives it away.) That's what I can't tell. Or is this a modern pamphlet written in the style of something that would have been written 100 years ago?

I mean, I feel like an idiot, because it so obviously is some type of joke or humor, but I can't ascertain its provenance.

The Stafford Cripps 05-25-2017 02:24 PM

No, they all sound plausible enough to be anecdotes about real people. I guessed correctly that 'natus' is the Latin for 'born'; it means that the man's real name was Julius Godalming, but he was predictably given the nickname 'Caesar'. I'm pretty sure it's from about a century ago, otherwise there would be some more recent stories.

Telperion 05-25-2017 02:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by The Stafford Cripps (Post 20232029)
No, they all sound plausible enough to be anecdotes about real people. I guessed correctly that 'natus' is the Latin for 'born'; it means that the man's real name was Julius Godalming, but he was predictably given the nickname 'Caesar'. I'm pretty sure it's from about a century ago, otherwise there would be some more recent stories.

The Roman numerals are a nice touch, though. 1829, I think.

pulykamell 05-25-2017 08:05 PM

Oh, indeed he is a real person. Apparently real name, but born in Godalming.

blindboyard 05-26-2017 03:55 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by The Stafford Cripps (Post 20232029)
No, they all sound plausible enough to be anecdotes about real people. I guessed correctly that 'natus' is the Latin for 'born'; it means that the man's real name was Julius Godalming, but he was predictably given the nickname 'Caesar'. I'm pretty sure it's from about a century ago, otherwise there would be some more recent stories.

Printed 1999, first edition listed as 1977.

Bill Door 05-26-2017 06:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by The Stafford Cripps (Post 20228471)
(snip)If true, this is funny. The horse clearly knew that Morley was a bad batsman, and that it would be expected to soon pull the roller to prepare the pitch for the other team's innings.

Yes, but a horse named Horace? A little too on the nose there, isn't it? And speaking of noses, check out the long face on Horace!

Noel Prosequi 05-30-2017 02:48 AM

My favourite cricket stories involve sledging, a dubious practice where the fielding team tries to rattle the composure of the batsman on strike. This is not the "Mmm batter batter, swing batter batter" stuff of baseball, but frank insults and torments designed to achieve "mental disintegration" of the batsman - make them angry or unconfident, either way hopefully resulting in a mis-hit ball. It works because unlike in baseball, there are typically a significant number of fielders close to the batsman working in unison to shake the batsman.

So Glenn McGrath (an all-time great Australian fast bowler) has been bowling without success to Arjuna Ranatunga (I think). McGrath is frustrated at not being able to get Ranatunga out, and the only thing he can think to say to him is "Ranatunga, why are you so fat?!?" (Ranatunga was famously portly).

Ranatunga returned with the glorious comeback "Because every time I sleep with your wife she gives me a biscuit" (cookie in American).

McGrath had nothing and just went nuts.

DesertDog 05-30-2017 06:21 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by blindboyard (Post 20229417)
What manner of beast sells a free gift?

Well, somebody must because there are constant references to "free gifts" in advertising, implying there are regular gifts that you must pay for.

Cugel 05-30-2017 06:36 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Noel Prosequi (Post 20241226)
So Glenn McGrath (an all-time great Australian fast bowler) has been bowling without success to Arjuna Ranatunga (I think)

Eddo Brandes


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