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Bonnie14 05-26-2017 09:39 PM

Books you can't stop reading
 
So, years ago I was at a Barnes and Noble with a friend of mine. She was looking for books on dog training and i just wandered. I found this book that I started reading and could not stop. She found me in the isle and said "let's go". I pretty much never put that book down.Bought and it read it every chance i had. So what is your book? The one one you cant put down.





I dont know how to do the spoilers




"Into the Wild" by Jack Krakauer.

DeepLiquid 05-26-2017 09:44 PM

The Chronicles of Tornor by Elizabeth A. Lynn, I've read them so much I've been through three complete sets of them since the 80's.

Bonnie14 05-26-2017 10:33 PM

Years later I had that book on my bookshelf and a friend of mine from out of town recognized the spine of that Krakauer book...We had a wonderful conversation about it.

Bonnie14 05-26-2017 10:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DeepLiquid (Post 20235443)
The Chronicles of Tornor by Elizabeth A. Lynn, I've read them so much I've been through three complete sets of them since the 80's.

I will have to check that out. just the name intrigues me.

Bonnie14 05-26-2017 10:50 PM

I have been a reader my entire life. I don't know why; i used to get in trouble for using a flashlight to read after 'bedtime'. I am the only person I know who knows some Shakespeare, Twain, Poe, etc. I often say "Once more into the breach" when i go into the jail. it is lost on the staff. :)

madsircool 05-26-2017 11:31 PM

American Tabloid by James Ellroy...electric writing and real and fictional characters. He doesnt waste a word.

kayaker 05-27-2017 07:43 AM

For ten consecutive years now I've reread Elmoore Leonard's Rum Punch while vacationing in St Martin in January. On our first day there we traditionally visit Friar's Bay, where I light up a doobie, get comfortable in my lounger, and hook up with Jackie Brown.

RealityChuck 05-27-2017 08:27 AM

Replay by Ken Grimwood

don't ask 05-27-2017 08:46 AM

Do you start a little further into the book each time?

Chronos 05-27-2017 08:51 AM

It's been said that the quickest way to teach an English boy French is to give him a copy of Around the World in 80 Days with only the first half translated. He's not going to be able to put it down even if it means learning a new language to keep reading.

JackieLikesVariety 05-27-2017 08:52 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bonnie14 (Post 20235429)
So, years ago I was at a Barnes and Noble with a friend of mine. She was looking for books on dog training and i just wandered. I found this book that I started reading and could not stop. She found me in the isle and said "let's go". I pretty much never put that book down.Bought and it read it every chance i had. So what is your book? The one one you cant put down.





I dont know how to do the spoilers




"Into the Wild" by Jack Krakauer.


I had that with Into Thin Air by the same author but even more so

The Perfect Storm by Sebastian Junger - man that was a good book, go get a copy if you've never read it. I'm serious. :)

SpoilerVirgin 05-27-2017 09:13 AM

I once spent a weekend reading Into Thin Air six times. I would read the book all the way through, then turn around and start at the beginning again. I could not stop reading it. I have both Into Thin Air and Into the Wild on my Kindle, so if I have a spare moment and nothing else I'm reading, I can read them again. I've probably read each at least 30 times.

But that's nothing compared to a book called When Genius Failed by Roger Lowenstein. I have read that book well over a hundred times. I just read it again last week.

BTW, it's Jon Krakauer.

Sattua 05-27-2017 09:31 AM

I have Into the Wild on the shelf, waiting for me to get around to it. I'll check it out.

I find the Little House books to be compulsively readable, and I've read through them about thirty times. Usually I intend to stop after Big Woods & Farmer Boy, but they suck me in.

I don't know; I am a reader, though my current phase of life doesn't provide many opportunities for sitting quietly doing nothing. I've rushed headlong through so much. Agatha Christie's mysteries; the Game of Thrones books; the Outlander books; the Anne of Green Gables books; many Booker prizewinners; many Victorian triple-deckers.

The book I keep coming back to, that reveals new layers every time I read it, is Howard's End.

Lucky Mike 05-27-2017 05:25 PM

The Colleen McCullough books on Rome. Probably have read them 10 times.

Clothahump 05-27-2017 05:53 PM

I am a voracious reader. I have several authors that I have collected their entire series and I read those books at least 2-3 times a year.

Jim Butcher - Dresden Files
Michael Connely - the Bosch novels
Dick Francis
Lee Child - Reacher

Just to name a few.

Penfeather 05-27-2017 06:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bonnie14 (Post 20235526)
I often say "Once more into the breach" when i go into the jail. it is lost on the staff. :)

Unto.

Son of a Rich 05-27-2017 06:58 PM

I have no idea how many times I read Henry Miller's Rosy Crucifixion.

Guinastasia 05-27-2017 10:53 PM

The Harry Potter series. It's almost as if as soon as I'm done reading them, I want to start all over again. For Christmas I got a new set of the first five books because mine had just fallen apart.

Qadgop the Mercotan 05-28-2017 10:07 AM

"The Lord of the Rings". First picked it up at age 14, immediately re-read it, repeated that process about 8 times before interrupting it briefly with another book.

salinqmind 05-28-2017 10:34 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Qadgop the Mercotan (Post 20237577)
"The Lord of the Rings". First picked it up at age 14, immediately re-read it, repeated that process about 8 times before interrupting it briefly with another book.

I've been re-reading that trilogy on and off for more than 30 years. I can pick it up anywhere and the world fades away, and I am in another world.

Gone With The Wind is another, I must have read that 50 times.

The Last Unicorn by Peter S. Beagle. That one is in my heart and soul forever. I am so disappointed a live version movie has never been made (it was planned, starring Mia Farrow as Molly, but never came about. Cillian Murphy would have made a stunning Schmendrick.)

madsircool 05-28-2017 10:50 AM

Is Schmendrick the villain?

DeepLiquid 05-28-2017 11:34 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by salinqmind (Post 20237621)

Gone With The Wind is another, I must have read that 50 times.

If you ever feel like being incensed, read "The Blue Bicycle", Margaret Mitchell should be spinning in her grave.

I picked it up when it first came out to take on a camping trip, I think I threw it across the campsite at least a dozen times, complete rip off of GWTW, complete.

salinqmind 05-28-2017 09:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by madsircool (Post 20237646)
Is Schmendrick the villain?

No, he's the hero, but it takes him a while to get up to speed. The villains are the evil King, and his Red Bull.

ekedolphin 05-29-2017 03:27 PM

The Phantom Tollbooth by Norton Juster.

As far as Star Trek goes:

The I.K.S. Gorkon series of novels by Keith R.A. DeCandido, and the assorted Deep Space Nine relaunch novels.

madsircool 05-29-2017 03:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by salinqmind (Post 20238727)
No, he's the hero, but it takes him a while to get up to speed. The villains are the evil King, and his Red Bull.

I ask because the name has negative connotations in Yiddish.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schmendrick

salinqmind 05-29-2017 09:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by madsircool (Post 20240042)
I ask because the name has negative connotations in Yiddish.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schmendrick

(Oh, I heard the word before in the past, but never knew it was a 'thing'. ) The Last Unicorn Schmendrick trained to be a 'magician' but the true magic ....well, let's say it was delayed.... The evil king made him be a frustrated court jester kind of 'magician' doing stupid tricks, to entertain the king's bitter, long days.... yeah, he was made into quite the fool, a Schmendrick.

TonySinclair 05-29-2017 11:19 PM

I've read The Curse of Chalion, by Bujold, probably 8 or 9 times, which is 6 or 7 more times than any other book I can think of. It's just a beautifully written book, an interesting fantasy incorporating an interesting theology.

Dung Beetle 05-30-2017 09:57 AM

Gone With the Wind and Jane Eyre for me. I'll open them at any point and be sucked right in. Sometimes I re-read parts from memory.

Once in high school, I found a copy of The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy someone had left behind in class. I started reading it and was riveted. A couple of class periods later, one of my friends got annoyed because I wouldn't put it down, so he took it and hurled it away. We were sitting on the top row of the bleachers in the gym and it landed on a tiny ledge up near the ceiling, where it may be to this very day. I had to go buy a copy. :mad:

Elendil's Heir 05-30-2017 11:36 AM

Every few years I find myself drawn back to Gary Jennings's Aztec, a great historical novel, and George R.R. Martin's Tuf Voyaging, an equally great sf environmental satire.

Quote:

Originally Posted by JackieLikesVariety (Post 20235931)
...The Perfect Storm by Sebastian Junger - man that was a good book, go get a copy if you've never read it. I'm serious. :)

It is very good. Something that stuck with me all these years since I first read it - phlegmatic, tough-as-nails Coast Guard pararescue divers referring to terrifyingly mountainous seas as "sporty." Sporty!

Barkis is Willin' 05-30-2017 12:05 PM

I've read The Catcher in the Rye many, many more times than any other book. There's a nostalgia factor to it. But the Song of Ice and Fire series were the books that kept me up late into many nights. I'd say, "one more chapter," for about three chapters.

Jackmannii 05-30-2017 01:49 PM

I have enjoyed and periodically re-read Willie Sutton's autobiography, Where The Money Was.

The robberies are interesting; the escapes from prison are fascinating.

JackieLikesVariety 05-30-2017 07:53 PM

Quote:

It is very good. Something that stuck with me all these years since I first read it - phlegmatic, tough-as-nails Coast Guard pararescue divers referring to terrifyingly mountainous seas as "sporty." Sporty!
yes! and the descriptions of what they have to go through in training - very interesting

DesertDog 05-31-2017 10:41 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bonnie14 (Post 20235429)
I dont know how to do the spoilers

That would be [spoiler]This meat tastes funny[/spoiler]

SPOILER:
See?

CalMeacham 05-31-2017 11:58 AM

The Lord of the Rings, like Qadgop. I long ago lost track of how many times I've been through it. And now I have it on audio, as well, and can "read" it in my car.

The Day of the Jackal -- just a superbly written thriller. I like Forsyth's other early stuff, too, but this one is th overall best.

Cecil Scott Forester's Hornblower saga. Just about all the books. I never got into Patrick O'Brien's series, but I've re-read all of Forester's books many times

Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes stories.

Snake_Plissken 05-31-2017 12:01 PM

"Blood Meridian", "Suttree", "No Country for Old Men". Cormac McCarthy is the greatest living American author in my opinion. I get something new out of them every time I re-read these books. I'll get the urge to pick one up and then that's it...gotta finish it.

ivylass 05-31-2017 02:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Lucky Mike (Post 20236589)
The Colleen McCullough books on Rome. Probably have read them 10 times.

I love those!

For me it's the Outlander series by Diana Gabaldon.

Slow Moving Vehicle 05-31-2017 06:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TonySinclair (Post 20241016)
I've read The Curse of Chalion, by Bujold, probably 8 or 9 times, which is 6 or 7 more times than any other book I can think of. It's just a beautifully written book, an interesting fantasy incorporating an interesting theology.

Me, too. In fact, I love - and frequently reread - all of her "World of the Five Gods" works. The religion is, as you noted, fascinating - one reviewer called them works of "speculative theology". The last novel, about Penric and Desdemona, she seems to be writing as a series of novellas. The first three, Penric's Demon, Penric and the Shaman, and Penric's Mission can be read as standalones; but the next one, Mira's Last Dance, not only flows directly from the event's of Penric's Mission, but ends on a cliffhanger. I suspect that is when she realized she's writing a serialized novel. I can't wait for the next installment.

Bujold's Vorkosigan Saga is also fantastic. She has the gift of writing believable, fleshed out male characters, as well as female. As well as a nice touch of humor.

A series that I periodically return to again and again - for no reason I could easily describe - is William Gibson's post-cyberpunk "Bigend" trilogy - Pattern Recognition, Spook Country, and Zero History. Interesting stories and compelling characters - I especially like Hollis Henry, Fiona, and Milgrim - but there's something about the flow of Gibson's prose that is both soothing and quietly compelling.

digs 05-31-2017 06:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Qadgop the Mercotan (Post 20237577)
"The Lord of the Rings". First picked it up at age 14, immediately re-read it, repeated that process about 8 times before interrupting it briefly with another book.

Same here. Got almost no sleep for a good chunk of 9th grade as a result. For me the "another book" was "Bored Of The Rings". Fell off my chair laughing, in Algebra class, where I had it tucked inside my textbook.

Donegal Dragon 06-01-2017 08:01 AM

Have read "Little,Big" by John Crowley at least a dozen times and have given away at least a dozen more copies. Also find myself picking up "The Dubliners" by James Joyce to read a few pages at a time. Get lost in the flow of rich characters.

Haldurson 06-01-2017 08:20 AM

A few books were like that for me. I was a voracious reader when I was a kid. Grandfather taught me how to read before I started school, and I almost always had a book with me. He used to give me books by the boxload. I even got chased out of the adult book section of my local library (my mom had a fit and balled out the librarian).

Anyway, my very first pageturners were probably the Tom Swift series. The next one was probably T.H. White's "The Once and Future King". I also ravenously consumed a whole lot of Asimov, starting with "Pebble in the Sky" (never tried his juveniles), and then discovered "The God's Themselves" which I still think was his best work. I read almost everything of his that I could find (not all of which were page-turners). Of course I devoured his Robot stories.

The next big page-turner I found was "Dune". I devoured "Time Enough for Love", "The Moon is a Harsh Mistress", and "Stranger in a Strange Land"

When I got older, and in college, I had a Vonnegut kick, and went through several of his novels in a few days -- "Mother Night"was my favorite.

I've been a much slower reader lately. "American Gods" is my current favorite, but still, it took me a few days. I've devoured a few of Terry Pratchett's Discworld novels, but it's not like when I was younger, and could just sit and read for hours at a time. My focus just isn't what it used to be.

Sangahyando 06-01-2017 11:26 AM

I’ve much enjoyed Frederick Forsyth’s novels -- “thrillers with some intellectual worthwhileness” -- IMO varying somewhat in quality, but I’ve been moved to read more than one more than once, and never come upon one which I reckoned a total dud. For me, though, his The Fist of God (about the 1990 – 91 Gulf War) is special: I’ve read it at least four times, and will likely do so again in the future. I find it totally on-the-edge-of-one’s-seat gripping and suspenseful -- even if one is re-reading and knows how things will turn out -- and fascinatingly complex: this, so far as I’m concerned, irrespective of one’s sympathies or otherwise, with the countries involved.

(My respect for Forsyth has increased, on hearing that he -- in his late seventies -- has lately told of his retiring from further writing, fiction or otherwise; informing, with admirable candour, that “I ran out of things to say”. One could wish for similar conduct on the part of other authors, “well-stricken in years”, who nonetheless -- relying on their reputation established in earlier times -- go on and on into their dotage writing and having published, stuff which becomes quite embarrassingly awful.)


Quote:

Originally Posted by TonySinclair (Post 20241016)
I've read The Curse of Chalion, by Bujold, probably 8 or 9 times, which is 6 or 7 more times than any other book I can think of. It's just a beautifully written book, an interesting fantasy incorporating an interesting theology.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Slow Moving Vehicle (Post 20244887)
Me, too. In fact, I love - and frequently reread - all of her "World of the Five Gods" works. The religion is, as you noted, fascinating - one reviewer called them works of "speculative theology". The last novel, about Penric and Desdemona, she seems to be writing as a series of novellas. The first three, Penric's Demon, Penric and the Shaman, and Penric's Mission can be read as standalones; but the next one, Mira's Last Dance, not only flows directly from the event's of Penric's Mission, but ends on a cliffhanger. I suspect that is when she realized she's writing a serialized novel. I can't wait for the next installment.

Bujold's Vorkosigan Saga is also fantastic. She has the gift of writing believable, fleshed out male characters, as well as female. As well as a nice touch of humor.

I take delight in the Vorkosigan Saga, especially the books in the latter half / two-thirds thereof -- can read those time and again. Less happy outcome for me with other works by Bujold. Her "World of the Five Gods" failed to do it for me. Read The Curse of Chalion and was favourably impressed, without being totally bowled over. Went on to Paladin of Souls, and had to give up something like halfway through -- struck me as just trite, and wearisome. To be honest, what really killed POS for me -- people will probably think this absurdly trivial -- was that dratted "Pony Express messenger-girl" Liss. Bloody smug twerp, she irritated the heck out of me: I was pushed over the already-nearly-reached edge, by the great desire to hear no more about her.

Qadgop the Mercotan 06-01-2017 02:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by digs (Post 20244920)
For me the "another book" was "Bored Of The Rings". Fell off my chair laughing, in Algebra class, where I had it tucked inside my textbook.

Grundig Blaupunkt Luger Frug
Watusi Snarf Wazoo
Nixon Dirksen Nasahist
Rebozo Boogaloo!

CalMeacham 06-01-2017 02:53 PM

A king of elves
There was of old
Saranwrap by name
Who slew the narcs at Mellowmarsh
And Sorhed's host did tame
And with him marched the stubby dwarves
Drafted from their mines
And when the fearsome battle raged
They hid behind the lines

Hari Seldon 06-01-2017 05:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DesertDog (Post 20243903)
That would be [spoiler]This meat tastes funny[/spoiler]

SPOILER:
See?

I quoted this to ask you how you stopped it from making a spoiler out of it, but now I have learned something new: [noparse].

leftfield6 06-01-2017 06:06 PM

I have reread the entire (21 books) Patrick O'Brien Aubrey-Maturin series at least 8 times. Each time is a good 5-6 month commitment. So I've spent, give or take, 4 years of my life in the Napoleonic War.

Trinopus 06-01-2017 06:39 PM

Back in the 70s, I read the whole "Silistra" series by Janet Morris. The sexy Boris Vallejo covers helped make the sale.

I never really enjoyed the books. They were weak and "puffy." Pseudo feminist (you know, feminist but with prostitutes) and no appreciable plot at all. I'm frankly damned if I know WHY I kept reading them; I think I was just waiting for them to get good. They never did.

Tigers2B1 06-01-2017 08:51 PM

The Road by Cormac McCarthy.

kayaker 06-01-2017 09:03 PM

[QUOTE=Hari Seldon;20247318] but now I have learned something new: [noparse].[/QUOTE]

What a country!:D

The Stainless Steel Rat 06-01-2017 09:06 PM

For single books, The Martian by Andy Wier si one I read every 8-10 months, and still can't put it down until I'm finished.

For series it's Eric Flint's (and many co-authors) Ring of Fire books, I can pick almost anyone off the shelf and enjoy re-reading it (re-reading the short story collection "Ring of Fire II" right now).

And every December I re-read all 11 (to date) volumes of the collected "Schlock Mercenary" web comic...and then read the follow-on 3-4 volumes not in book form on the web.

jtur88 06-02-2017 10:31 AM

I found Stieg Larsson's "Dragon Tattoo" trilogy hard to put down.

Last week, I found Anne Tyker's "Patchwork Planet" in a hostel in Paramaribo, and read it in two days, I had forgotten how much I enjoyed her books.


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