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Old 01-13-2009, 02:31 AM
Markxxx Markxxx is offline
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Join Date: Apr 1999
Location: Chicago,IL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Captain Amazing View Post
As soon as Dorothy gets to Oz, the first thing that happens is that she kills the Wicked Witch of the East. This is clearly a reference to her mother, who died in childbirth bearing Dorothy.
But if we're sticking to the movie we don't know this, in fact we don't know that Dorothy's mother and father are dead at all. Dorothy doesn't even realize she killed someone till Glinda points it out to her. So Glinda again is central to her reality.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Captain Amazing View Post
For further proof of that, note that she first lands in Munchkintown...the Munchkins, with their diminutive stature, clearly represent infants.
How does small with old faces equal infants?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Captain Amazing View Post
Further, after the witch is killed, her slippers wind up on Dorothy's feet...this is Dorothy's "inheritance", so to speak.
But they don't just happen to wind up on Dororthy's feet. They are deliberately stolen from the East Witch and put their by Glinda. Again meddling where she doesn't belong.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Captain Amazing View Post
Her protests to Glinda and the Munchkins that "I didn't mean to kill her", shows her residual guilt at her mother's death.
Doesn't her protest of innocence come AFTER the East Witch accuses her of murder not before?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Captain Amazing View Post
Glinda, who appears at this point, is Dorothy's idealized version of her mother, glimmering and beautiful, but ultimately, unable to help her.
But Glinda appeared before that point and didn't appear but was summoned. But Glinda clearly was able to help Dorothy but deliberately chose NOT to do it. Glinda exposed Dorothy to danger only to resuce her to keep her from getting killed so she could kill the West Witch.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Captain Amazing View Post
At the same time Glinda appears, so appears the Wicked Witch of the West, upset that Dorothy "killed my sister",
But this was after long after Glinda appeared and after a 15 minute on screen interlude of singing and dancing and celebrating of the East Witches death, while Dorothy was given presents, such as lollipops for her murdering of a figure.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Captain Amazing View Post
and demanding the slippers the Wicked Witch of the East had.
Incorrect the West Witch is more concerned of the crime committed and the fact that people are celebrating her sister's death. In fact it, once again, Glinda who has to say "Aren't you forgetting about the Ruby Slippers?" Then she procedes to use steal the West Witch's rightful claim.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Captain Amazing View Post
The Wicked Witch of the West is, of course, no one other than Aunt Em (or at least Dorothy's image of Aunt Em), whose sternness Dorothy fears (Aunt Em was the disciplinarian, compared to her more laid back Uncle Henry), and who she feels resents her for, as Dorothy sees it, "killing her sister (Dorothy's mother).
Again we never see this if we're going strictly by the movie. Aunt Em at best in the movie is busy not unconcerned. If I recall correctly it is her Uncle Henry who give's Toto to Miss Gultch while Aunt Em defends Dorothy saying "If I wasn't a good Christian woman, I'd tell you what I think of you." Also Em defends Dorothy saying "Just because you own half the county doesn't mean you can tell the other half what to do." Aunt Em in the movie shows love care and defends Dorothy.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Captain Amazing View Post
Glinda being dead, is unable to help her "get home" (i.e., reenter into the loving family structure that Dorothy feels she misses out on due to her absent mother), so Dorothy has to go to the Emerald City and see the Wizard (Uncle Henry, as will be explained later).
Glinda is shown to be alive throughout keeping Dorothy safe enough to do her dirty work

Quote:
Originally Posted by Captain Amazing View Post
So, Dorothy sets off, and along the way meets her personal insecurities (the scarecrow, tin man, and lion, representing Dorothy's own feelings of stupidity, fear of inability to love, and cowardice.) These images are so well known that I don't really have to go into much detail, I'm sure, although I will point out that feelings of inadequacy, emotional abandonment and timidness aren't uncommon among orphans).
When do we ever get the suggestion Dorothy has those fears. She expresses, love to her dog, anger when she defends him from Miss Gultch, adventure by running away. She's not afraid of strangers going into Professor Marvels trailer a man she doesn't even know.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Captain Amazing View Post
The Wizard will help her get home, but only if she kills the Witch and brings back her broomstick. (Dorothy has externalized all her negative feelings at her situation...her orphanhood, the poverty in which she lives, etc., and placed it all on Aunt Em.
Dorothy hardly lives in poverty. She lives on a farm in the 30s. She has a nice home, lots animals to eat and a farm which employes THREE hired hands and requires Dorothy to do no work must be successful. Remember all the hired hands and Aunt Em and and her uncle are working while Dorothy is bitching about a problem she largely brought on herself. Aunt Em is clearly distressed by her workload but doesn't ask Dorothy to help, just merely stay out of her way, while she does everything

Quote:
Originally Posted by Captain Amazing View Post
Aunt Em has become, for Dorothy, the source of all her misery. How much better it would be, she thinks, how possible it would be for me to have a home, a real home, if Aunt Em were out of the picture and it were just Uncle Henry and me. We could have a happy home together. There's no doubt here's a strong Electra Complex going on here as well.)
Huh? Dorothy loves Aunt Em and cries for her throughout the movie. The closest thing she comes to feeling negative about Aunt Em is when she says "I've been gone so long Aunt Em and Uncle Henry have probably stopped wondering where I am."