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Old 12-29-2014, 10:49 AM
CalMeacham CalMeacham is offline
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Join Date: May 2000
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,412
Quote:
Originally Posted by panache45 View Post
When I was a kid, back in the '50s, on the front page of the newspaper was an article and photo. The photo showed a baby that had been born . . . numerous heads and arms and legs, seemingly arranged randomly. I remember shrieking and running out of the house. Wish I'd never seen that.
Sounds like standard fare for the National Enquirer back in those days. The NE has become more discrete in recent years, but back in the 1950s and 1960s they went for the grotesque photos of babies and such on the front page in the hopes of persuading folks to pick up their little newspaper.

If it soothes your conscience, I'm pretty sure that their images were constructions and darkroom creations* as much as the "God's hand seen in thunderstorm" or "Batboy" pictures later were.



Quote:
In 1953, Pope revamped the format from a broadsheet to a sensationalist tabloid focusing on sex and violence. The paper's editorial content became so salacious that Griffin was forced by the Mayor to resign from the city's Board of Higher Education in 1954.[6] In 1957, Pope changed the name of the newspaper to The National Enquirer and changed its scope to national stories of sex and scandal.[6] Pope worked tirelessly in the 1950s and 1960s to increase the circulation and broaden the tabloid's appeal. In the late 1950s and through most of the 1960s, the Enquirer was known for its gory and unsettling headlines and stories such as: "I Cut Out Her Heart and Stomped on It" (Sept. 8, 1963) and "Mom Boiled Her Baby and Ate Her" (1962). At this time the paper was sold on newsstands and in drugstores only. Pope stated he got the idea for the format and these gory stories from seeing people congregate around auto accidents. By 1966, circulation had risen to one million.[6]
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Enquirer




*They'd have used Photoshop if it had been around then.