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Old 05-27-2016, 07:47 AM
bowlweevils bowlweevils is offline
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Chemical = Electrical

Quote:
Originally Posted by Me_Billy View Post
Seems to me human memories are made up of chemicals / brain wiring. Not something which could be "downloaded" as it is not electrical. That is not electrical unless "thought about" perhaps?
Chemical reactions are electrical reactions. Well, electromagnetic reactions, since you can't have one without the other (electricity and magnetism).

As the name suggests, the electron is the basic unit of electricity. Chemical reactions involve the transfer of electrons in various ways to alter the relative locations of molecules.

For example, the system that makes cells function runs on transfers of electrons via adenosine tryphosphate. Gatorade and your gardening adviser aren't lying about the importance of potassium for healthy growth and maintenance of your body and plants.

In the psychological world, researchers analyze the time course of changes in the electrical status of various parts of the brain to link them to the responses to stimuli (called "event-related potentials" or "ERPs"). These are generally referred to with a polarity and a time, so the P300 ERP is a positive electrical spike that occurs about 300ms after the exposure to a stimulus that was unexpected for the context.

Yes, fMRI voxels are better, but ERPs are so much cheaper. And a bit more ecologically valid.

OK, fine, nuclear reactions are chemical reactions that are not primarily electromagnetic in nature. However, nuclear reactions induce powerful electromagnetic activity in chemicals. This is because they involve smashing bits of matter together in a way that causes a whole bunch of electrons to go crazy, regardless of whether that smashing results in fission or fusion.

But the point remains: human neurons, like all things composed of matter that undergo changes, do so using electrons as the foundational mechanism. No voltage change, no chemical reaction.