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Old 12-05-2016, 11:42 AM
watchwolf49 watchwolf49 is offline
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Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: State of Jefferson
Posts: 7,382
There's actually good reasons why home aren't built of logs anymore ... and good reasons why there's not very many old homes built of logs ... they just don't last ...

Let's skip the obvious ... dirt floors may have been okay in the 19th Century frontier ... but today this is considered unacceptable ... thus the concrete slab floor you're planning and I'm sure your excavator SO is dialed in on the foundation and just how God awful deep y'all are going to be digging ...

As mentioned above ... there's only a few species of tree that are suitable for this construction ... the others will rot long before the mortgage is paid off ... and these suitable species are in extremely high demand ... they are milled up into siding and if you've priced cedar siding lately you know just how much you'll be paying for enough logs ... and these logs will have to properly seasoned ... cut them down, stack them with air gaps and covered, and a year minimum before you can use them ... green logs will twist and warp during dry weather and that'll make a mess of everything ...

Are you planning on renting a milling machine and a crane ... or are you going to hand-hew them ... maybe in the 19th Century we could find enough straight trees, but today this isn't the case ... at a minimum you'll need to hew the top and bottoms so they fit together ... and have plenty of extra ... there will be mistakes and there will be logs ruined while you learn how to fit them together properly ...

... and you'll still be framing your roof ... even in the 19th Century, people hand sawed dimensional lumber to build trusses ... as far as I know, log roofs were only built in coastal Norway and where these folks immigrated to here in the USA ... so not surprisingly, purlin construction is something of a lost art ...

Your electrical will be in pipes nailed to your walls and the electrical boxes will protrude out into your living space ... I suppose you could cut channels on the inside of the logs ... but either way you might find this will look awful, perhaps ruining the rustic look you're trying to achieve ... plumbing, cable, phone all the same thing ... just nailed to your walls ...

You avoid these and other problems by buying a kit, with it's warranty ... and from the links above we can certainly say these are beautiful homes in every way ... I'll bet dog hair to kitty litter these companies sell more modest kits ... something for every budget ... there's some trade-offs with this route but I'll double down my bet that you will be completely satisfied with the results (and so will your insurance agent) ...

I once worked in a mill where we made pre-cut log cabins ... we'd buy 4x8 cedar beams, run them through a planer to round off the sides and cut a tongue-and-groove system on top and bottom, cut them to length, notch them and load all the pieces into a semi-trailer so they could be hauled out to Amish country ... about half our business ... the Amish didn't have a problem with electric wiring ... it was completely forbidden in fact ... so our kits were of great value to them because they could assemble these kits by themselves ... no power equipment needed ... just a sledge hammer ...