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Old 10-13-2017, 06:14 PM
Omega Glory Omega Glory is offline
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Join Date: Apr 2001
Posts: 3,766
Quote:
Originally Posted by nearwildheaven View Post
Forget about ever getting a job with a name like that, assuming you stay out of jail long enough to ever apply for one.

(well, it's true)
If by true you mean racist, then yes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by papaw View Post
I guess I am asking the wrong question.
Without any disrespect to African-Americans, the names I am asking about are the ones that in the last 25 years or so have surfaced with odd to me spellings and unknown origins.
Some examples are-
Jedeveoon, Bonquisha,Tanisha, T'a nay,, Deshaun, Tayshaun, Deron, Rau'shee, Raynell, Deontay, Taraje, Jozy, Kerron, Hyleas, Chaunte, Bershawn, Lashawn, Sanya, Trevell, Sheena, Ogonna, Dremiel , and many others.
"it is largely and profoundly the legacy of African-Americans," writes Eliza Dinwiddie-Boyd in her baby-naming book "Proud Heritage." Shalondra and Shaday, Jenneta and Jonelle, Michandra and Milika -- in some parts of the country today, nearly a third of African-American girls are given a name belonging to no one else in the state (boys' names tend to be somewhat more conservative).
Why is this so ?
If you wanted a large variety of real answers on this, you've come to the wrong place since this is not a very diverse board. Why? Americans of all races put a big emphasis on their ancestral culture. People feel connected to Ireland and Italy etc. even if their family left generations ago. African Americans didn't get the opportunity to know where their ancestors came from until relatively recently, thanks to the rise of ancestral DNA testing. So some people made up names that they thought sounded African, and some people made up names because they thought they sounded pretty. Then other people adopted some of those names, and they spread. Names like Lashawn, Tanisha and Deontay, for example, don't even strike me as unusual. They've been in widespread use for years. It's become a tradition. It's a new tradition, but it's no less valid than any other.