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  #1  
Old 12-04-2005, 06:09 PM
Governor Quinn Governor Quinn is offline
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Strangest Book You Have Ever Found

When I was doing research in my campus library a short time ago, I found a book claiming to be the autobiography of William Shakespeare. This struck me as peculiar, for reasons that are obvious. Curious, I decided to read it.

It turned out to be even stranger when I actually read it. It was quite clear, from both word usage and style, that it owed more to the late 19th century (it was published in 1911) than it did to the late 16th, and its' claims about Shakespeare's life seem to have come more from earlier authors than from the facts.

The final weirdness came when I researched the self-professed editor (and, in my opinion, the author), expecting to find him to be some obscurity.

He turned out to be the founding secretary of the Royal Historical Society.

So, anyone else found any stranger works?
  #2  
Old 12-04-2005, 06:24 PM
carlotta carlotta is offline
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The Osmond Brothers and the New Pop Scene

Back cover copy:

"Just how special are Donny, Wayne, Merrill, Alan and Jay? What do they have in common with David Cassidy and the Jackson 5?"

First page:

"There is a new sound in America, a catchy pop sound that is completely different from anything that has ever happened before in pop music. The age of the rock dinosaurs with their blaring chords and their ear-splitting amplification has come to an end"

Used book store. 98 cents
  #3  
Old 12-04-2005, 06:58 PM
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Whe I was working at the library of the American Museum of Natural History, I found an early 19th-century book on how to track and kill vampires of every nation.
  #4  
Old 12-04-2005, 07:25 PM
capybara capybara is offline
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There's a very very odd book published 1499 or so in Venice called the Hypnerotomachia Poliphili-- something vaguely like (multiple pun) "the Strife of Love in a Dream (but with Polifilo used as the protagonist's name as well-- Mr Many-Luvs). It's written in something like Italian mixed up with Latin, Greek, Hebrew, fake hieroglyphics, chaldeaen (!), etc in James Joyce-style portmaneau, following this character (maybe?) from one place to another-- a garden made all of precious gems-- flowers made from diamond and leaves from jade, etc etc, to a huge building shaped like an elephant, etc etc, in search of his women. And the illustrations and typography are absolutely wacky, too-- some totally graphically erotic (for the time--a Priapus character, naughty fauns, etc), others just confusing. A book for the über-elite-intellectual of 1500. It's the Italian Renaissance equivalent of Finnegan's Wake.

I want that vampire manual. ..
  #5  
Old 12-04-2005, 07:53 PM
Tuckerfan Tuckerfan is offline
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The Destruction of the Temple a sci-fi novel by Barry N. Malzburg. It's about a director filming a reenactment of the Kennedy assassination in an apparently post-apocalyptic America who somehow keeps getting looped into the bodies of participants in the actual assassination. The whole thing reads like Hunter S. Thompson wrote it, and even though I've read it half a dozen times, I still haven't completely figured it out.
  #6  
Old 12-04-2005, 07:55 PM
Shalmanese Shalmanese is offline
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I found a book in my university library published early 20th century going on this huge crazy rant about how the move away from the gold standard was a massive consipracy by an international cartel to keep the working class down. And that the war and the recession were both deliberatly engineered to keep the population down.
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Old 12-04-2005, 07:59 PM
Orual Orual is offline
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I once ran across a purported copy of the Necronomicon in a used bookstore.

It was a cheaply bound paperback with no publishing information. Very weird.

I want Eve's vampire hunting manual too!
  #8  
Old 12-04-2005, 08:37 PM
Paul in Qatar Paul in Qatar is offline
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Why Paint Cats? a satire on the art world consisting of dozens of cats painted in various styles, Gothic, classical, op-art, whatever. In addition it has discussions with the cat's owners discussing their artistic message.

The cats are done in photoshop and the interviews are pure parody.

The thing is that it is so well-done, I had the book for years before I finally and authoritatively figured out it was a send-up.

It is still on Amazon.
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Old 12-04-2005, 08:39 PM
jasonh300 jasonh300 is offline
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As I Lay Dying by William Faulkner. VERY strange.
  #10  
Old 12-04-2005, 08:48 PM
Evil Captor Evil Captor is offline
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Great Mambo Chickens and Transforming the Human Condition" -- a book about the Extropian movement. They're most noted for cryogenically preserving their bodies instead of burying them or incinerating them. It was a weird but exhilirating read - to encounter that kind of faith in the future.
  #11  
Old 12-04-2005, 10:53 PM
Horatio Hellpop Horatio Hellpop is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Orual
I once ran across a purported copy of the Necronomicon in a used bookstore.

It was a cheaply bound paperback with no publishing information. Very weird.
This was actually advertised in Heavy Metal (the comics magazine) circa 1978. The photo looked like it was solidly bound with a gold-leaf pseudo pentagram on the cover.
  #12  
Old 12-05-2005, 01:51 AM
BrainGlutton BrainGlutton is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Orual
I once ran across a purported copy of the Necronomicon in a used bookstore.

It was a cheaply bound paperback with no publishing information. Very weird.
This? http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/038...books&v=glance
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Old 02-09-2017, 07:05 AM
Haldurson Haldurson is offline
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Originally Posted by Orual View Post
I once ran across a purported copy of the Necronomicon in a used bookstore.

It was a cheaply bound paperback with no publishing information. Very weird.
I remember I was at a New York Science Fiction convention (Lunacon) back in the 1970s -- Robert Bloch was there (author of a variety of horror stories and fantasy and such). He was on a panel talking about the Cthulhu Mythos. Someone on the panel mentioned that they owned a bookstore and people kept calling him up asking if he had the Necronomicon in stock. So (if I remember correctly) he (or possibly Robert Bloch) claimed to have written one -- too many years ago for me to remember that panel accurately. Later, I found a paperback with that title. It was done partly as a joke on those people who thought the book was real. Well, it became real. At the convention, I remember looking for the book in the dealers room and (as you say) it wasn't signed, but I did find a paperback 'translation' of it. I remember it contained all of these incantations and rituals for summoning various entities.

There's some info at Wikipedia on a variety of books with that name, but the ACTUAL author isn't listed there (Remember that the fictional book was written by "the mad arab Abdul Alhazred". https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Necron...d_translations
  #14  
Old 12-05-2005, 10:10 AM
Polycarp Polycarp is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by capybara
There's a very very odd book published 1499 or so in Venice called the Hypnerotomachia Poliphili-- something vaguely like (multiple pun) "the Strife of Love in a Dream (but with Polifilo used as the protagonist's name as well-- Mr Many-Luvs). It's written in something like Italian mixed up with Latin, Greek, Hebrew, fake hieroglyphics, chaldeaen (!), etc in James Joyce-style portmaneau, following this character (maybe?) from one place to another-- a garden made all of precious gems-- flowers made from diamond and leaves from jade, etc etc, to a huge building shaped like an elephant, etc etc, in search of his women. And the illustrations and typography are absolutely wacky, too-- some totally graphically erotic (for the time--a Priapus character, naughty fauns, etc), others just confusing. A book for the über-elite-intellectual of 1500. It's the Italian Renaissance equivalent of Finnegan's Wake.

I want that vampire manual. ..
It's fairly likely I'm being whooshed here, but just in case you're serious, have you ever encountered The Rule of Four? And here is a source for the [url="http://www.thamesandhudson.com/en/1/0500285497.mxs?&0&0&0"]Hypnerotomachia Poliphili[/ url]
  #15  
Old 12-05-2005, 10:24 AM
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A novel called Krazy Kat. Not by George Herriman, but featuring his characters - it was a stream-of-consciousness novel based on the comic strip, that had no plot that I can recall (except for Ignatz occasionally throwing bricks at Krazy and Pup locking him up).

Very hard to get through.
  #16  
Old 12-04-2005, 11:13 PM
Sampiro Sampiro is offline
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There was once a chain of drug stores/discount stores called Phar-Morr that I loved because in addition to renting movies for $.69 each (who cares if they're good?) they sold books for a fraction of the cover cost. Usually it was a recent bestseller or the type of book you'd see in a remainder bin at a chain store, but sometimes they had "the hell?" titles, a couple of which I bought just for my bookshelf. One was a children's book about Woodstock (luckily not scratch and sniff- "stick the little Mickey Mouse tab on your tongue, then look at the paisley picture") and the other was my favorite (actually had it, I bought several copies to give as gifts): An Illustrated Guide to Chinchilla Diseases.

Buying too many copies of Chinchilla disease books bankrupted the company. Well, that and executives embezzling a half billion dollars from the company, in some order.
  #17  
Old 12-05-2005, 12:52 AM
Ranchoth Ranchoth is offline
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I once ran across The Complete Time Traveler: A Tourist's Guide to the Fourth Dimention in an isolated antique store run by a Torgo-like fellow...a shop which later completely disappeared from the face of the Earth. (Probably because it was pretty ramshackle, and was built over the bank of a river that's prone to flooding.)

Odd little book, that. I still have it's packaged away, somewhere.

And I saw The Stuwwelpeter in Borders, but I already knew about that one, so I don't suppose it counts.
  #18  
Old 12-05-2005, 11:59 AM
KlondikeGeoff KlondikeGeoff is offline
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A very strang, but wonderful book (I think) is The Circus of Dr Lao
  #19  
Old 12-05-2005, 12:15 PM
CalMeacham CalMeacham is offline
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Quote:
A very strang, but wonderful book (I think) is The Circus of Dr Lao
Strange, yes, but not, I think as strange as many isted here, or as obscure. It's been reprinted many times, and made into a film by George Pakl. I highly recommend it.

Another book by Charles G. Finney, but harder to find, is The Unholy City.
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  #20  
Old 12-05-2005, 12:45 PM
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Arrival at Easterwine: The Autobiography of a Ktistec Machine, by R. A. Lafferty. Indescribable, but absolutely brilliant.
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  #21  
Old 12-05-2005, 07:41 PM
Lama Pacos Lama Pacos is offline
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Wow, I read this thread earlier today, hit up the bookstore this afternoon, and what's the very first book I see on display when I enter the store? Why Cats Paint, of course.
  #22  
Old 12-05-2005, 08:01 PM
Bosda Di'Chi of Tricor Bosda Di'Chi of Tricor is offline
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The Book Of Weird by Barbra Ninde Byfield

It was once entitled The Glass Harmonica.

Page 88 explains the differences between Hermits, Anchorites, and Recluses.

Page 104 deals with: Parchment and Vellum, Port, Prince Bishops & Cardinals.

Page 158 contains tables of
.
  • Canonical Hours
  • Sacraments
  • Deadly Sins
  • Splendid Virtues
  • Pertinent Seas
  • Pleiades
  • And the Seven Wonders
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Some kind of high powered mutant never even considered for mass production.
Too weird to live, and too rare to die.
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  #23  
Old 02-05-2017, 12:38 AM
Bibliothecarius Bibliothecarius is offline
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What, no mention of the Codex Seraphinianus yet?

These strange books consist of whole lists of strange books:
Fish Who Answer the Telephone and Other Bizarre Books
How to Avoid Huge Ships and Other Implausibly Titled Books
  #24  
Old 02-05-2017, 11:55 PM
Penfeather Penfeather is online now
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What, no mention of the Codex Seraphinianus yet?
I have a copy.
  #25  
Old 02-05-2017, 01:26 AM
penultima thule penultima thule is offline
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More macabre than strange but:
Frances Larson's "Severed - A History of Heads Lost and Heads Found"
  #26  
Old 02-05-2017, 07:11 AM
foolsguinea foolsguinea is offline
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About thirty years ago, I found, as I recall. two volumes of a sort of young readers' illustrated technological history of some spacefarers in the future. Very non-fiction-like, basically a bunch of illustrations, just all made up. I don't remember the names at all.
_

Um, Robert Anton Wilson's Masks of the Illuminati is actually pretty clever. I don't think I'd have the patience for it now, but if you want to know what RAW considered a Mind Fuck, reading this book might do it for you.
  #27  
Old 02-05-2017, 09:14 AM
Ignatz Ignatz is offline
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Shelby Steele's 2008 book: A Bound Man-Why We Are Excited About Obama and Why He Can’t Win
  #28  
Old 02-05-2017, 10:21 AM
Wendell Wagner Wendell Wagner is offline
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A few years ago I read Love Is Not Constantly Wondering If You're Making the Biggest Mistake of Your Life by Anonymous.

I heard about it in this article in Slate which tells you enough about the book for you to understand why it's weird without spoiling it:

http://www.slate.com/articles/arts/b...reviewed_.html
  #29  
Old 02-05-2017, 10:24 AM
Prof. Pepperwinkle Prof. Pepperwinkle is offline
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Atlas of Human Anatomy by Dr. Victor H. Frankenstein. There is (or was) a copy in the Herron School of Fine Art Library, IUPUI, Indianapolis. Lots of spectacular hand-drawn illustrations, notes in fine penmanship, and never breaks character.
  #30  
Old 02-05-2017, 01:39 PM
furryman furryman is offline
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I actually have several of the books mentioned here.
I can't remember the title but there's a book written by Phillip Jose Farmer. Basically it's about Doc Savage meeting Tarzan. You would think that a book about such an interesting subject written by such a good writer would be interesting. It reads like a fan fiction written by a teenager.

The Third Policeman by Flan O"Brien.

My grandmother had a book published in 1776 detailing how civilization was on the verge of collapse.
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Old 02-06-2017, 01:03 AM
Plumpudding Plumpudding is offline
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I actually have several of the books mentioned here.
I can't remember the title but there's a book written by Phillip Jose Farmer. Basically it's about Doc Savage meeting Tarzan. You would think that a book about such an interesting subject written by such a good writer would be interesting. It reads like a fan fiction written by a teenager.
Heh, this thread got me thinking about "Venus on the Half-Shell". I thought it was pretty strange, but even stranger was the pulp novels Simon, the protagonist, was reading.
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Old 02-05-2017, 02:10 PM
furryman furryman is offline
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Another one I thought of. The Prince of Morning Bells By Nancy Kress. It's supposed to be a typical fantasy novel, but for some reason she's replaced a lot of obscure words with sound alike words. For example a sentence like "They attacked the crenelated wall with a trebuchet." Would be turned into something like "They attacked the mentholated wall with a trebek." Kind of amusing the first time she did it, vaguely amusing the second time and downright annoying the other 100 times.
  #33  
Old 02-05-2017, 09:15 PM
Ukulele Ike Ukulele Ike is offline
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I own a Masonic Bible.
  #34  
Old 02-05-2017, 09:47 PM
erysichthon erysichthon is offline
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When I was in high school in the early 70s, I came across a copy of The Urantia Book while browsing in a B. Dalton bookstore. It freaked me out; I had never had any exposure to alternative religions, and this seemed like a book from a parallel universe. I didn't buy it, but I told one of my friends about it, and he actually went and bought the damn thing.
  #35  
Old 02-05-2017, 10:28 PM
jtur88 jtur88 is offline
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Travel phrase books are often hilarious.

In a Greek-English phrase book, chapter "on the boat", the English sentence "Soon we will see earth." Meaning, soon we will see land.

A Portuguese phrase book: "Wake me at two o'clock, I shall need to take an aspirin."

I found one British phrasebook, telling me in the other language what time "half six" is. Luckily I knew the other language well enough to translate "half six" from British to American. Bur now I've forgotten, and can't remember if it is 5:30 or 6:30.

A reprint of an Arabic phrasebook from around 1900: "My shoes are soiled -- see that the bootblack is caned."

Some clever American once wrote an Oklahoma phrase book. Bob wore faints = barbed wire fence. Chick at all = (Would you like me to) check that oil (on your dipstick)?

And the classic from the glorious years of the Raj in India: "Summon the fire brigade, the jute mill has exploded."
  #36  
Old 02-05-2017, 10:47 PM
The Stainless Steel Rat The Stainless Steel Rat is offline
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I think the two strangest I read were back in college while browsing the stacks at Kent State.

One was called Tooth and Talon: Tales of the Australian wild / by Henry G. Lamond. Which was a group of stories about various Australian wildlife, with the climax of each being a fight to the death between two males over breeding rights. Every. Single. Story.

The other was Horse-fight and Horse-race in Norse tradition. by Svale Solheim, which was more like a Doctorate paper than a book, but if you wanted to know how the Vikings entertained themselves with their horses, well, this is the definitive work on that topic.

I don't think I've read anything stranger in the last 40+ years...and glad I haven't.
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Old 02-05-2017, 10:54 PM
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marque elf wrote: "I was a fan of Norman Spinrad's when I was in high school. He wrote a book called The Iron Dream. It was ostensibly a science fiction novel written by Adolph Hitler, a painter and writer living in Paris who had dabbled in radical politics in his youth. Very strange and I'm still not sure whether it was a work of genius or psychosis.

Spinrad also gave us Men In The Jungle, where the 3 protagonists go to a frontier world to foment a revolution in order to gain wealth and power. Things get weird very quickly and there are lavish descriptions of canabalism and rape in the book. Reading the book made me feel dirty, as if I had somehow been made an accomplice in the atrocities."

I have read both of those. "Iron Dream" is both a work of genius and psychosis. It comes with an almost superfluous afterword that puts the whole thing into perspective. It is, to say the least, unique.
  #38  
Old 02-05-2017, 10:58 PM
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The strangest book I can think of that achieved best-selling status was this one. I have heard that a movie is in some stage of the works, and if they cast anyone other than John Malkovich as Mr. Penumbra and Seth Rogen as Clay, the movie will be a disastrous failure.

https://www.amazon.com/Mr-Penumbras-...hour+bookstore

While looking up the link, I found out that the author has since published a prequel called "Ajax Penumbra 1969". I'll have to check it out.

A while back, I found a book at a rummage sale called "Clothes Make The Man" that appeared to be about Appalachian mill towns, and the introductory chapter was, as were the plates in the center of the book, but most of the text was stream-of-consciousness rambling.

https://www.amazon.com/Clothes-Make-...s+make+the+man

As a Friends of the Library volunteer, a lot of strange things come our way, and one of the strangest I've seen, simply because of the age group it was aimed at, was a book about abortion, from the pro-life Catholic perspective, aimed at lower elementary children. I couldn't imagine a child that young having the life experience to understand what it was about anyway.
  #39  
Old 02-05-2017, 11:15 PM
wendelenn wendelenn is offline
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I'm a librarian, so I love this site of weird, wacky and wonderful books that are still on some library shelves that definitely should not be there any more:

http://awfullibrarybooks.net

Last edited by wendelenn; 02-05-2017 at 11:17 PM.
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Old 02-06-2017, 11:28 AM
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We have quite a library at home, but nothing too weird.

We do have (I forget the title) an illustrated napkin-folding guide and The Jane Austen Handbook: A Sensible Yet Elegant Guide to Her World. It include fashion, meal plans, manners, etc. My wife likes being fancy every once in awhile.

Oh, and a Bible written in Icelandic.
  #41  
Old 02-06-2017, 11:44 AM
Andy L Andy L is online now
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I saw a copy of a Humument at a library once http://www.tomphillips.co.uk/humument - now that's a weird book.
  #42  
Old 02-06-2017, 01:08 PM
Gedd Gedd is offline
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I saw a copy of a Humument at a library once http://www.tomphillips.co.uk/humument - now that's a weird book.
Dude had a lot of time.
  #43  
Old 02-06-2017, 01:32 PM
Biffy the Elephant Shrew Biffy the Elephant Shrew is offline
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I saw a copy of a Humument at a library once http://www.tomphillips.co.uk/humument - now that's a weird book.
Thanks for posting this...I own three different editions of this work (Phillips repeatedly revised and added new and different artwork over the years) plus the app version, and now I see that a "Final" edition has just been published, which is a must-have for me.
  #44  
Old 02-06-2017, 03:48 PM
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The Man Who Folded Himself is a time-travel yarn with a weird wrinkle. Our hero is presented with a time machine built into a belt by a strangely familiar old man. Along the way, he finds out that every time he travels, he leaves himself in a separate reality stream. He starts to run into himself all over the place. Somehow, one of him becomes female, and he mates with her. He happens on to a place where he dies, over and over again, witnessed by several of him, and her. He figures out that the old man who gave him the belt was him. Very strange.
It starts out odd, and gets really weird. It's very funny. It's brutal, too, but more funny.
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Originally Posted by CalMeacham View Post
That's by David Gerrold, who gave us (among other things) The Star Trek episode "The Trouble with Tribbles". TMWFH was an attempt to jam every time travel cliche he could think of into a single story.
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Originally Posted by iamthewalrus(:3= View Post
Sounds like he ripped both stories off from Heinlein. The time travel story appears to be a mix of By His Bootstraps and All you Zombies..., while tribbles bear an uncanny resemblance to the martian fuzzballs in The Rolling Stones.
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Originally Posted by CalMeacham View Post
In his book The Trouble with Tribbles (which is about writing the script, not a novelization), Gerrold claims that he didn't have Heinlein consciously in mind while writing "Tribbles" -- he says he thought he was retelling the story of rabbits in Australia. It wasn't until later, when somebody pointed out the similarity that he realized it, and recalled reading the book and the flatcats. Some people claim that he got permission from Heinlein, but that's clearly not true. I believe that he contacted Heinlein about it at one point, and Heinlein was cool with it.

As I noted above, TWHFH was a conscious attempt to cram every time travel cliche into a single volume, so of course he referred to Heinlein's stories -- as well as everyyone else's. It's not exactly a "rip off".
I've not heard Gerrold's explanations, only the observation that several of his novels seem "inspired directly" (cribbed?) by Heinlein. Not only The Trouble With Tribbles, and The Man Who Folded Himself, but When Harlie Was One being inspired by The Moon Is A Harsh Mistress - not so much the whole plot but the AI aspects.

TMWFH is a solipsism extension of Heinlein's two stories, most explicitly with All You Zombies, where the protagonist is a time traveler who was born a hermaphrodite but fertile female who was seduced and impregnated, during delivery the organs were damaged and she was surgically transformed to be a man, who then went on to seduce himself. TMWFH takes that further, by running into alternate reality versions of himself. In each case, every major event in their lives is dictated by another version of themselves.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
I found one British phrasebook, telling me in the other language what time "half six" is. Luckily I knew the other language well enough to translate "half six" from British to American. Bur now I've forgotten, and can't remember if it is 5:30 or 6:30.
I believe it means "half hour before 6".



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Originally Posted by nearwildheaven View Post
As a Friends of the Library volunteer, a lot of strange things come our way, and one of the strangest I've seen, simply because of the age group it was aimed at, was a book about abortion, from the pro-life Catholic perspective, aimed at lower elementary children. I couldn't imagine a child that young having the life experience to understand what it was about anyway.
It's called "pre-indoctrination" - get 'em early before they know anything by which to evaluate it. "This is the way it is," at the time when everything a child learns is "This is the way it is" from a "trusted" source.
  #45  
Old 02-06-2017, 04:00 PM
Andy L Andy L is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Irishman View Post
I've not heard Gerrold's explanations, only the observation that several of his novels seem "inspired directly" (cribbed?) by Heinlein. Not only The Trouble With Tribbles, and The Man Who Folded Himself, but When Harlie Was One being inspired by The Moon Is A Harsh Mistress - not so much the whole plot but the AI aspects.
And of course, "A Matter for Men" is certainly inspired by Starship Troopers (not that there's anything wrong with that).
  #46  
Old 02-06-2017, 06:12 PM
hogarth hogarth is online now
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At a Saskatoon Public Library book sale, I once bought a copy of a fairly thick book that was named something like "Population Statistics of Ringed Seals (1973-1978)". It was somewhat dry reading.
  #47  
Old 02-06-2017, 11:27 PM
nearwildheaven nearwildheaven is offline
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Several years ago, my brother found out that our 3rd grade teacher's master's thesis was available through inter-library loan (not sure how he found this out) and requested it. He said it was actually fairly interesting; it was a collection of case studies of boys who had benefited from being held back at the kindergarten or 1st grade level.

She got that degree in the early 1960s, and died about 20 years ago.

Last edited by nearwildheaven; 02-06-2017 at 11:28 PM.
  #48  
Old 02-07-2017, 12:01 AM
Robot Arm Robot Arm is offline
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I'm surprised I didn't post in this thread the first time around. My oddest is probably Golfing for Cats, although I have an older edition with different cover.

Oh, and I have a German dictionary of American slang, but I haven't been able to find it in a while.
  #49  
Old 02-07-2017, 04:55 AM
Kamino Neko Kamino Neko is offline
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Originally Posted by Robot Arm View Post
My oddest is probably Golfing for Cats, although I have an older edition with different cover.
... OK, that 'different cover' certainly increases the 'strange' level. Is there actually a reason for it, or is it just random weirdness?
  #50  
Old 02-07-2017, 08:47 AM
ftg ftg is offline
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As a kid I came across a book in out house that was the US Census for Oregon. For 1860. Just page after page of tables. Surprisingly good sized.

Not just an odd book, but apparently no one knew how it was obtained nor why it was kept.
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