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  #1  
Old 11-02-2010, 04:29 PM
Hampshire Hampshire is offline
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Did anyone check your ID when voting?

Did anyone check your ID when voting?
I went in to vote today and all they did was asked me my name, they looked me up alphabetically in a book, I signed by my name, got a ballot and voted.
Are they supposed to check IDs?
What would stop me from going in there every couple hours looking a bit different and giving them my neighbors name and voting in their place?
What would they do if I came in to vote and somebody had already signed by my name?
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  #2  
Old 11-02-2010, 04:31 PM
Snowboarder Bo Snowboarder Bo is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hampshire View Post
Did anyone check your ID when voting?
I went in to vote today and all they did was asked me my name, they looked me up alphabetically in a book, I signed by my name, got a ballot and voted.
Are they supposed to check IDs?
What would stop me from going in there every couple hours looking a bit different and giving them my neighbors name and voting in their place?
What would they do if I came in to vote and somebody had already signed by my name?
AFAIK it is illegal to check IDs at polling places. Needing an ID to vote would constitute a de facto poll tax, which would be an infringement on the franchise.

ETA: I see that some states have enacted laws that require a gov't issued ID in order to be able to exercise the franchise. Not sure how they got around the poll tax aspect. I suspect some lawyer-type will be along soon enough to 'splain it to us.

Last edited by Snowboarder Bo; 11-02-2010 at 04:33 PM..
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  #3  
Old 11-02-2010, 04:40 PM
alphaboi867 alphaboi867 is online now
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Nope. Nobody even asked what my name was. The poll worker just glanced at me, then looked my name up in the big book of voters & had me sign.
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  #4  
Old 11-02-2010, 04:42 PM
Airman Doors, USAF Airman Doors, USAF is offline
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Yes. they checked my ID when I voted. You can't vote at a booth if you don't have it here, but I believe you can get a poll to be mailed in. For what that's worth, after the fact.
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  #5  
Old 11-02-2010, 04:50 PM
CyclopticXander CyclopticXander is offline
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States decide the rules on this. This might be helpful.

http://www.ncsl.org/default.aspx?tabid=16602

I've always been asked for ID, and we asked for IDs when I worked the polls. When I voted today in SC there was a very visible sign right outside saying that you needed some sort of ID, photo or voter's registration card.

In a lot of places they will give you a provisional ballot if you don't have an ID, and you can prove your identity later to have the vote counted, there are lots of little things like that.

Poll workers don't always follow the rules though and it is very possible to not be asked in a state that requires it, and yes in that case you could indeed vote fraudulently. If someone actually reports voter fraud, I imagine both the voter and the poll worker would be on the hook.

If someone goes to vote but their name has already been used, most poll workers would be required to report it and it would be investigated. The voter would still be allowed to cast a ballot in most cases. Once again though, voting practices are state issues except in the federal laws that trump the states (voting rights and such).

So the answer is it's kinda sticky.
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  #6  
Old 11-02-2010, 09:01 PM
Bricker Bricker is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Snowboarder Bo View Post
AFAIK it is illegal to check IDs at polling places. Needing an ID to vote would constitute a de facto poll tax, which would be an infringement on the franchise.

ETA: I see that some states have enacted laws that require a gov't issued ID in order to be able to exercise the franchise. Not sure how they got around the poll tax aspect. I suspect some lawyer-type will be along soon enough to 'splain it to us.
The Supreme Court, in Crawford v. Marion County Election Board, 553 U.S. 181 (2008), held that state laws requiring voters to show picture ID was constitutional. It was a 6-3 decision. In the Indiana law they upheld, a person without an ID could cast a provisional ballot, which would be validated within ten days by either presenting their photo ID or a notarized statement saying they can't afford one.
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  #7  
Old 11-02-2010, 04:47 PM
Jas09 Jas09 is online now
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MO requires a govt-issued ID to vote. It's generally easiest just to provide a DL, which is what I did. You can get a free voter ID card that is also acceptable (which I believe circumvents the poll tax concern). There are also provisional ballots available if you are challenged or aren't on the rolls.
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  #8  
Old 11-02-2010, 04:48 PM
gonzomax gonzomax is offline
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Last time I went to polls, I produced my voter registration. they looked it up in the books.
I do absentee ballots now. But have to go for primaries and local votes.
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  #9  
Old 11-02-2010, 04:59 PM
Skammer Skammer is offline
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I was asked for ID, and presented my voter registration card.
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  #10  
Old 11-02-2010, 05:03 PM
JohnT JohnT is online now
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Yes. Texas voter here.
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  #11  
Old 11-02-2010, 05:07 PM
Captain Amazing Captain Amazing is offline
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Yep, gave them my drivers license.
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  #12  
Old 11-02-2010, 05:18 PM
sevenwood sevenwood is offline
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PA voter checking in. They checked my signature against the one in the book, but that's it.

One of the ladies in front of me was a new voter (or hadn't voted recently) and didn't have an existing signature in the book. They asked her for an ID with a picture and signature on it, she gave them her driver's license (which had both), and they checked her signature against that.

(I should point out that she was already in the registry book - it's just that her existing entry didn't include a signature.)

Last edited by sevenwood; 11-02-2010 at 05:22 PM.. Reason: added last paragraph
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  #13  
Old 11-04-2010, 09:06 PM
Ferret Herder Ferret Herder is online now
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Originally Posted by sevenwood View Post
PA voter checking in. They checked my signature against the one in the book, but that's it.

One of the ladies in front of me was a new voter (or hadn't voted recently) and didn't have an existing signature in the book. They asked her for an ID with a picture and signature on it, she gave them her driver's license (which had both), and they checked her signature against that.

(I should point out that she was already in the registry book - it's just that her existing entry didn't include a signature.)
This is how it's done in Illinois. One person in line around the time that I was there was asked for an ID. Otherwise you walk up, give your full name, they look you up in the book, you sign by a copy of your signature. To fake voting for someone else, you'd have to suspect they weren't going to turn out to vote, know that someone by that name was registered at that voting station, and be able to kind of fake their signature.
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  #14  
Old 11-05-2010, 03:40 PM
descamisado descamisado is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ferret Herder View Post
This is how it's done in Illinois. One person in line around the time that I was there was asked for an ID. Otherwise you walk up, give your full name, they look you up in the book, you sign by a copy of your signature. To fake voting for someone else, you'd have to suspect they weren't going to turn out to vote, know that someone by that name was registered at that voting station, and be able to kind of fake their signature.
I agree.
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  #15  
Old 11-02-2010, 05:24 PM
Evil Captor Evil Captor is online now
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Yep I was asked for I'D and gave em my drivers license. Georgia has a history of controlling the vote if it can get away with it.
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  #16  
Old 11-02-2010, 05:29 PM
Pleonast Pleonast is offline
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I don't think they're allowed to check your ID in California. I showed them my sample ballot which has my name and address, since it speeds the check-in process.
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  #17  
Old 11-02-2010, 05:34 PM
flickster flickster is offline
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I produced my voter's registration card and no further ID was asked for - Texas
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  #18  
Old 11-02-2010, 05:37 PM
Sateryn76 Sateryn76 is offline
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Yup - photo ID is required in Indiana.

And I'm glad it is.
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  #19  
Old 11-02-2010, 05:43 PM
Frank Frank is offline
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Missouri requires an ID, but in addition to passport, driver's license and the like, Missouri will accept ID issued by a Missouri institution (public or private) of higher education, including a university, college, vocational and technical school; a copy of a current utility bill, bank statement, paycheck, government check or other government document that contains the name and address of the voter; and will also accept as ID an out of state driver's license.

This seems to me to be a perfectly reasonable set of options.

Had I been in a mood to play games, I could have showed them the Ontario driver's license that I still possess.
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  #20  
Old 11-03-2010, 03:13 AM
WarmNPrickly WarmNPrickly is offline
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Originally Posted by Frank View Post
Missouri requires an ID, but in addition to passport, driver's license and the like, Missouri will accept ID issued by a Missouri institution (public or private) of higher education, including a university, college, vocational and technical school; a copy of a current utility bill, bank statement, paycheck, government check or other government document that contains the name and address of the voter; and will also accept as ID an out of state driver's license.

This seems to me to be a perfectly reasonable set of options.

Had I been in a mood to play games, I could have showed them the Ontario driver's license that I still possess.
Huh. I've been voting in Missouri for a few years now and have yet to have my ID checked. I do always hold on to my voter registration card though.

Last edited by WarmNPrickly; 11-03-2010 at 03:14 AM..
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  #21  
Old 04-12-2011, 12:00 PM
wei ji wei ji is offline
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Utah. You bet your bippy they did. You have to show your voter registration card and a photo ID, or if you have a Utah "real ID" drivers license (as hard to get as a U.S. passport), you show that. You sign the book next to your name on the voter rolls, THEN you get a ballot. Two poll workers work this process, with a roving "watcher."
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  #22  
Old 11-02-2010, 06:47 PM
Vinyl Turnip Vinyl Turnip is offline
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Originally Posted by Sateryn76 View Post
Yup - photo ID is required in Indiana.

And I'm glad it is.
Why's that? Concerned someone might impersonate you and vote in your place?
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  #23  
Old 11-03-2010, 08:18 AM
Sateryn76 Sateryn76 is offline
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Originally Posted by Vinyl Turnip View Post
Why's that? Concerned someone might impersonate you and vote in your place?
Sure - maybe not me, but I can certainly see it happening. So, let's say Joe Schmo shows up to vote, and someone has already voted in his place. A dispute is filed immediately with the Poll Judge, he casts a provisional ballot, and it is dealt with "later." Which never comes, or comes too late.

I live in NWI, which likes to play Chicago Machine politics, but with much more stupid players. I have no problem believing that some Dem would cook up a plot and disenfranchise lots of county votes.
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  #24  
Old 11-03-2010, 12:34 PM
AuntiePam AuntiePam is offline
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Iowa. Photo ID needed only for new voters, or voters new to the precinct. Poll workers have a printed voter register and a computerized register.

Something I've noticed over the years is that deceased voters and voters who've moved from the area stay on the register. We had people in the register who've been gone (one way or the other) for years. We also had one voter who could have voted twice. He had two registrations -- one using his first initial middle name, one with first name middle initial. Same address, DOB, SSN.

We've asked the auditor about the outdated registrations. She said they need documentation to make changes -- death certificate, notarized statement from the person who moved, etc. It's good that they don't just take the word of poll workers (I went to his funeral!) , but it does leave things open for some small scale fraud.
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  #25  
Old 11-02-2010, 05:43 PM
rocking chair rocking chair is offline
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no id here in phila pa. of, course i've lived in the same house all my life and 2 of the people working the polls are neighbours that have known me since i was born.

we have the match the signature thingy here.
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  #26  
Old 11-02-2010, 05:43 PM
longhair75 longhair75 is offline
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no one asked to see ID. They asked my name, found me on the list and I signed on the line next to my name
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  #27  
Old 11-02-2010, 06:37 PM
Hal Briston Hal Briston is offline
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Originally Posted by longhair75 View Post
no one asked to see ID. They asked my name, found me on the list and I signed on the line next to my name
The same -- New Jersey.
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  #28  
Old 11-02-2010, 06:10 PM
Southern Yankee Southern Yankee is offline
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North Carolina. They just asked my name and address and looked me up in the computer. No ID. I was tempted to come back later and vote as my neighbor....
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  #29  
Old 11-02-2010, 06:11 PM
Kolga Kolga is offline
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Yes, I was asked for my ID. I didn't even think about why it would be problematic.
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  #30  
Old 11-02-2010, 06:15 PM
Chronos Chronos is offline
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Here in Montana, the voter's registration card (just a flimsy bit of cardboard with no photo) is sufficient, but a driver's license works as well, and I imagine they would accept almost anything (I've heard that a utility bill is enough). You do need to have something, though.

alphaboi, I take it that the poll worker knows you personally?
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  #31  
Old 11-02-2010, 06:17 PM
suranyi suranyi is offline
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In California I don't think I've ever been asked for ID. I certainly wasn't today.
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  #32  
Old 11-02-2010, 06:35 PM
Una Persson Una Persson is offline
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No, and I wish that my State did check IDs too.
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  #33  
Old 11-02-2010, 07:06 PM
foolsguinea foolsguinea is offline
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Yes. One of the ladies knows me, but she still wanted an ID. I had my card from the county clerk, but often I just use my driver's license.
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  #34  
Old 11-02-2010, 07:24 PM
Enginerd Enginerd is offline
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No ID needed in Nevada, as long as your name and signature are on the registration roll and your signature matches.
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  #35  
Old 11-02-2010, 07:29 PM
asterion asterion is online now
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Same in New York. Just sign the book and go. While I'm not inherently against the idea of IDing to vote, in practice it seems to be used as a fancy attempt at a poll tax.
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  #36  
Old 11-03-2010, 02:35 PM
descamisado descamisado is offline
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Originally Posted by asterion View Post
Same in New York. Just sign the book and go. While I'm not inherently against the idea of IDing to vote, in practice it seems to be used as a fancy attempt at a poll tax.
New York City (at least) has a registered voter book with a copy of your signature (from your registration form) by your name -- you sign again before you're allowed to vote and get challenged if the signature is too different.* Otherwise no ID is required, except in special cases where it'll say right there "ID REQUIRED."

I worked the polls yesterday and not one of the people who came to my table required ID, although there were some in the book who would have had to produce it had they come in.

If someone had actually already signed by your name and somehow not been caught, you could have filled out an affidavit ballot, which would be sent to the BoE, researched and either traced back to your voter registration form for signature matching or might possibly require your follow-up to complete the investigation, most likely leading to proof that you're the actual voter.

* As you know, it's hard to duplicate a signature you haven't practiced, unless you've gone through elaborate preparation of getting an example of that person's signature, practiced, and have it down pat.

Last edited by descamisado; 11-03-2010 at 02:40 PM..
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  #37  
Old 11-02-2010, 07:34 PM
Queen Tonya Queen Tonya is offline
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They checked ours.
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  #38  
Old 11-02-2010, 07:37 PM
Ian D. Bergkamp Ian D. Bergkamp is offline
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ID checked in Virginia. I can't remember how long it's been done that way.
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  #39  
Old 11-02-2010, 08:02 PM
elfkin477 elfkin477 is online now
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Nope. They ask your middle initial and address instead.
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  #40  
Old 11-02-2010, 08:07 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is online now
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Illinois. Nope. Not required by law anyway. I'm not exactly sure how I feel about being asked for ID before I vote. I would have to explore the issue a bit more before I come to a conclusion. My gut feeling is that it seems like a good idea, but I can see the "poll tax" side of the argument.
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  #41  
Old 11-02-2010, 08:29 PM
jsgoddess jsgoddess is offline
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Ohio requires ID. I was a presiding judge today.
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  #42  
Old 11-02-2010, 08:32 PM
Jorge_Burrito Jorge_Burrito is offline
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No ID in N.M., but was asked for address and birthday to see if matched records, and then asked to sign.
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  #43  
Old 11-02-2010, 08:34 PM
IvoryTowerDenizen IvoryTowerDenizen is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hampshire View Post
Did anyone check your ID when voting?
I went in to vote today and all they did was asked me my name, they looked me up alphabetically in a book, I signed by my name, got a ballot and voted.
Are they supposed to check IDs?
What would stop me from going in there every couple hours looking a bit different and giving them my neighbors name and voting in their place?
What would they do if I came in to vote and somebody had already signed by my name?
Yes. They checked my driver's license and crossed me off a list organized by street.
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  #44  
Old 11-02-2010, 08:46 PM
badlyburnttoast badlyburnttoast is offline
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They checked my ID (they even had some sort of scanner thing they scanned it in).

However, there was a sign that said if you didn't have a proper picture ID there was some extra form you could fill out and sign instead.
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  #45  
Old 11-02-2010, 08:57 PM
Markxxx Markxxx is offline
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In Illinois they don't require it unless you're challanged. When I first moved back to Chicago, I was always getting flagged. Which meant when I showed up to vote, I had to produce proof was living where I was. I had a state ID and voting card so it was easy. But I admit it bugged me that someone was challanging my right to vote in the district every single election till 2004. Then it stopped.

Today not a SOUL was in my polling place. The workers told me I was the first person they'd seen in over an hour. And I voted at 9am. But Illinois has month long early voting and I live in an area that is mostly immigrants so I can see not a lot of people voting. But I've never seen it that deserted. I live two doors down from the polling area so I can watch it.
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  #46  
Old 11-02-2010, 09:10 PM
Freudian Slit Freudian Slit is offline
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I just gave my name and wasn't asked for an ID.
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  #47  
Old 11-02-2010, 09:14 PM
BigT BigT is offline
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I voted absentee, so no. But even in 2008 when I actually went to the polling place, I foudn out that the only time you need I.D. is when you register for the first time.

I'd love to believe they had a photo on file from then on, but that doesn't seem to be the case.
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  #48  
Old 11-02-2010, 09:33 PM
Chronos Chronos is offline
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In the Indiana law they upheld, a person without an ID could cast a provisional ballot, which would be validated within ten days by either presenting their photo ID or a notarized statement saying they can't afford one.
Where are the folks who can't afford an ID expected to find a notary public?
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  #49  
Old 11-02-2010, 10:23 PM
Scarlett67 Scarlett67 is offline
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No, but the poll worker has known me and Mr. S personally for many years, him since they were in school together, me since we got married. Pretty sure she knew it was really us.
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  #50  
Old 11-02-2010, 10:37 PM
Una Persson Una Persson is offline
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Where are the folks who can't afford an ID expected to find a notary public?
Most banks around here will do it for free, although they'll grouse about it a bit.
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