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  #1  
Old 02-29-2016, 01:58 PM
Poysyn Poysyn is offline
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Tiny errors that drive you insane

I was watching "The Good Wife" recently, and they had an episode where Alicia was meeting with high-ranking military and government officials. I am generally willing to suspend my disbelief with most things military in most movies, after all, I recognize that it's a pretty steep learning curve to expect everyone to get everything right.

Except for one thing.

And every single time I see it, it drives me insane. It's such a small, nothing detail, and would be SO EASY for them (Hollywood) to get it right, but they really never do.

Why does every military beret look like someone threw a wool pizza on their head? Seriously. It's ridiculous. Form the damn beret! It's such a simple thing.

Anyone else have a miniscule irritation centered around their industry or hobby, that would not be hard to get right, but for some reason, no one ever does?
  #2  
Old 02-29-2016, 02:02 PM
billfish678 billfish678 is offline
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The "double tube" look when someone looks through binoculars drives me insane...though it is so ingrained now in movies the average Joe probably freaks out when someone once in a great while shows it the right way.

Cue sound of eagle that sounds more like a screeching red tailed hawk now...
  #3  
Old 02-29-2016, 02:16 PM
Dinsdale Dinsdale is offline
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Cue sound of eagle that sounds more like a screeching red tailed hawk now...
Funny - I was just in Costa Rica, and a guides phone rang with a long descending screech. I asked if that was a red tailed hawk, and he responded, "No - imperial eagle."

But yeah, I've been trying to learn a bit of birdsong, and it is striking how often they'll have something blatantly incorrect as background noise.

Re: the beret - are you talking about that (IMO) stupid looking flop over the brow look? Since all of the army started to ape Special Forces/Airborne/Rangers, I find that more irritating than any misrepresentation on screen! ;D
  #4  
Old 02-29-2016, 06:22 PM
dropzone dropzone is offline
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Re: the beret - are you talking about that (IMO) stupid looking flop over the brow look? Since all of the army started to ape Special Forces/Airborne/Rangers, I find that more irritating than any misrepresentation on screen! ;D
Yeah, that looks dorky, regardless the branch.

Um, except in the case of the Canadian military! Then it's sexy and tough and not the least bit stupid looking!
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Old 03-01-2016, 01:01 PM
Poysyn Poysyn is offline
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Yeah, that looks dorky, regardless the branch.

Um, except in the case of the Canadian military! Then it's sexy and tough and not the least bit stupid looking!
That's RIGHT!!

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Old 02-29-2016, 02:37 PM
Abner Ravenwood Abner Ravenwood is offline
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In keeping with the military theme of the OP, whenever a Marine salutes without a cover on his grape.
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Old 03-10-2016, 07:36 AM
OffByOne OffByOne is offline
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In keeping with the military theme of the OP, whenever a Marine salutes without a cover on his grape.
<Bolding mine>

What does that mean? I googled that phrase, and all I got were references to the exact phrase, with no discussion of what that means.
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Old 03-10-2016, 08:02 AM
terentii terentii is offline
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What does that mean? I googled that phrase, and all I got were references to the exact phrase, with no discussion of what that means.
Bareheaded, with no cap or helmet on. Marines typically have ultra-short crewcuts (or just plain shaved heads), hence the grape reference.

Last edited by terentii; 03-10-2016 at 08:03 AM.
  #9  
Old 03-10-2016, 08:18 AM
zamboniracer zamboniracer is offline
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Bareheaded, with no cap or helmet on. Marines typically have ultra-short crewcuts (or just plain shaved heads), hence the grape reference.
Because the phrase "no cover on his head" would be easily understood by all, and not a phrase understandable only by US Navy and other military types. It cheapens the thrill when non-members of the club understand things.
  #10  
Old 02-29-2016, 02:08 PM
ivylass ivylass is offline
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Originally Posted by Poysyn View Post
Why does every military beret look like someone threw a wool pizza on their head? Seriously. It's ridiculous. Form the damn beret! It's such a simple thing.
Heh. Ivygirl was just saying after graduation that she'd have to wet her beret again. She said they hold their shape for about three days.
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Old 02-29-2016, 10:30 PM
guestchaz guestchaz is offline
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Heh. Ivygirl was just saying after graduation that she'd have to wet her beret again. She said they hold their shape for about three days.
the beret thing the op mentioned drives me nuts too, plus the way they just plop the insignia where ever, usually dead center of the forehead like some sort of targeting reticule. Holy crap and if there is more than one "soldier" wearing a beret...they could at least try to be consistent from person to person on how they wear the thing.


ivylass, that's weird to me and Mrs. Guest, never had that problem ever with ours. shaved and shaped our berets once and it was good forever. wonder if they changed the material or something at some point. (took an entire day of walking around with wet wool on the head, stroking it periodically to shape it juuuust right)

Last edited by guestchaz; 02-29-2016 at 10:33 PM.
  #12  
Old 02-29-2016, 02:25 PM
Intergalactic Gladiator Intergalactic Gladiator is offline
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It takes a lot of work to form a beret and I assume the ones on TV are pretty much straight out of the box. You have to pull out the liner, wet it, shave it, squish it, wet it again, shave it some more, wet it, squish it into the right shape (put something really heavy on top of it), repeat a few more times until it looks sharp. I think mine took a week to form. I would assume a costume department isn't going to put much effort into forming berets but you're right Poysyn, floppy chef's hat berets look awful.
  #13  
Old 02-29-2016, 04:27 PM
Poysyn Poysyn is offline
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Originally Posted by Intergalactic Gladiator View Post
It takes a lot of work to form a beret and I assume the ones on TV are pretty much straight out of the box. You have to pull out the liner, wet it, shave it, squish it, wet it again, shave it some more, wet it, squish it into the right shape (put something really heavy on top of it), repeat a few more times until it looks sharp. I think mine took a week to form. I would assume a costume department isn't going to put much effort into forming berets but you're right Poysyn, floppy chef's hat berets look awful.
You can do it in less than a week, if you wear it until it dries, but our berets may be from different suppliers? I am not saying it has to be perfect (I don't expect that), but just flopped on with the little tails in back ARGH!

I did mention it was a tiny error
  #14  
Old 02-29-2016, 02:46 PM
terentii terentii is offline
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Whenever a grunt acknowledges a direct order with nothing more than a nod of his head. Of course, it would blow the entire budget if he said "Yes, sir!" or "Yes, Sergeant!"
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Old 02-29-2016, 02:51 PM
billfish678 billfish678 is offline
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Whenever a grunt acknowledges a direct order with nothing more than a nod of his head. Of course, it would blow the entire budget if he said "Yes, sir!" or "Yes, Sergeant!"
Reminds me of the time I faxed something. It was to a MASTER Sergeant....and I accidentally just put Sergeant on the header. People on the other end apparently howled with laughter. He was mad AS HELL. But I was a random civilian so what could they do?

On the one hand I kinda felt bad. But on the other hand he WAS kinda a dick so I didn't feel THAT bad about it.
  #16  
Old 02-29-2016, 02:57 PM
terentii terentii is offline
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Reminds me of the time I faxed something. It was to a MASTER Sergeant....and I accidentally just put Sergeant on the header. People on the other end apparently howled with laughter. He was mad AS HELL. But I was a random civilian so what could they do?.
You realize, of course, that by referring to him as just "Sergeant" you knocked him several rungs down the ladder?*

*An E-5 as opposed to an E-8!
  #17  
Old 02-29-2016, 03:00 PM
billfish678 billfish678 is offline
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You realize, of course, that by referring to him as just "Sergeant" you knocked him several rungs down the ladder?*

*An E-5 as opposed to an E-8!

Yes, but I was just an engineering peon myself....I actually caught a good bit of hell for that...but given that I was about as low my totem pole as I could be (and getting screwed to be honest about it)...and that it wasn't on purpose...it just kinda went over me like water on a ducks back...which I think probably just pissed some people off even more.

Last edited by billfish678; 02-29-2016 at 03:02 PM.
  #18  
Old 02-29-2016, 06:14 PM
rsat3acr rsat3acr is offline
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You realize, of course, that by referring to him as just "Sergeant" you knocked him several rungs down the ladder?*

*An E-5 as opposed to an E-8!
In speaking all sergeants are referred to as sergeant unless they are a first sergeant or sergeant major. In writing they would be addressed by rank; SGT SSG SFC MSG 1SG SGM CSM
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Old 02-29-2016, 07:09 PM
terentii terentii is offline
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In speaking all sergeants are referred to as sergeant unless they are a first sergeant or sergeant major. In writing they would be addressed by rank; SGT SSG SFC MSG 1SG SGM CSM
The incident in question did indeed involve a fax.
  #20  
Old 02-29-2016, 03:17 PM
DCnDC DCnDC is offline
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Washington, DC is the capitAl of the USA. That big white building downtown with the dome is the CapitOl.
  #21  
Old 02-29-2016, 03:20 PM
terentii terentii is offline
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Washington, DC is the capitAl of the USA. That big white building downtown with the dome is the CapitOl.
I once saw a guy lose on Jeopardy! by making this mistake ("Capitol" was the correct response.)
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Old 02-29-2016, 03:45 PM
Channing Idaho Banks Channing Idaho Banks is offline
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I like my mushrooms cut in slices. If I get my mushrooms quartered, I totally am not into it.
  #23  
Old 02-29-2016, 03:55 PM
Chefguy Chefguy is offline
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Electrical: calling a receptacle a "wall socket". I know it's just trade ignorance, but it bugs me.

For a real nitpick: you don't pour concrete, you place it. Even when it's being pumped to the top of a building and comes sliding down a chute, it's being 'placed'. I suspect there are few outside of the construction game who know that.

Cooking: "saute" does not mean to gently cook vegetables on low temperature. That's called "sweating". Saute means to fry something quickly in fat.
  #24  
Old 02-29-2016, 04:05 PM
Epimetheus Epimetheus is offline
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For a real nitpick: you don't pour concrete, you place it. Even when it's being pumped to the top of a building and comes sliding down a chute, it's being 'placed'. I suspect there are few outside of the construction game who know that.
Well, to be fair, it's not just movies or TV that does this, a quick Google search shows many instances of this, from Handyman magazine to Home Depot, to concretenetwork.com (in this case, the title is Pouring Concrete - How Concrete is Placed, but it still uses pouring in the article itself). It may be one of those common usage things that changes the definition of a word, like tragedy.

Last edited by Epimetheus; 02-29-2016 at 04:06 PM.
  #25  
Old 03-01-2016, 07:21 AM
Vinyl Turnip Vinyl Turnip is offline
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Electrical: calling a receptacle a "wall socket". I know it's just trade ignorance, but it bugs me.
I'm not in the trade, but please fight my ignorance: is "wall socket" not just one of the commonly used terms for "receptacle"?
  #26  
Old 03-02-2016, 09:33 AM
Quercus Quercus is offline
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For a real nitpick: you don't pour concrete, you place it. Even when it's being pumped to the top of a building and comes sliding down a chute, it's being 'placed'. I suspect there are few outside of the construction game who know that.
Well, I've heard someone definitely in the construction game refer to the event as 'a pour', multiple times.

They weren't a fancy nitpicking engineer type, so maybe the people with clean white hardhats do actually say 'place', but at least the grunts talk about 'a pour'.
  #27  
Old 03-02-2016, 08:10 PM
Rick Rick is offline
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Electrical: calling a receptacle a "wall socket". I know it's just trade ignorance, but it bugs me.

For a real nitpick: you don't pour concrete, you place it. Even when it's being pumped to the top of a building and comes sliding down a chute, it's being 'placed'. I suspect there are few outside of the construction game who know that.

Cooking: "saute" does not mean to gently cook vegetables on low temperature. That's called "sweating". Saute means to fry something quickly in fat.
Sorry, but I have to nitpick your nitpick. My father who for 40 years after WWII was in charge of building some very large very famous concrete buildings here in Southern California always said pour. As in we are pouring on Friday, so I will be home late.
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Old 03-04-2016, 10:04 AM
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For a real nitpick: you don't pour concrete, you place it. Even when it's being pumped to the top of a building and comes sliding down a chute, it's being 'placed'. I suspect there are few outside of the construction game who know that.
I had an uncle who worked in the concrete biz almost his whole life. One of his biggest projects was a large Interstate highway bridge. he was the pour supervisor for it. What else would you call him? The place supervisor?

(He also arranged for the 2nd driveway at our house when I was a kid. Nice range there.)

"Pour" was the word he used. Never heard "place".

Now, if you wanted to nitpick about "cement" being used where "concrete" is the right term, okay then.
  #29  
Old 02-29-2016, 04:27 PM
Bricker Bricker is offline
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You realize, of course, that by referring to him as just "Sergeant" you knocked him several rungs down the ladder?*

*An E-5 as opposed to an E-8!
A buddy of mine was running a motor pool in Vietnam during the war. He was a CW2, Army.

As he tells it, one day he gets a call: "This is Captain such-and-so. Please send a car to pick me up."

That was a pretty ballsy request from a junior officer, so it got placed at the bottom f a long list.

Several hours later: "This is Captain S-a-so -- where the hell is my car?"

At that point my friend says something like, "Maybe you should just get your own transport, sir." And hangs up.

An hour later, in storms Navy Captain Such-and-So. (The Naval rank of Captain is a senior officer, O-6, as opposed to,the comparatively lowly Army O-3).

This wasn't a film error, but the SGT / MSG confusion reminded me of the story. My friend dodged the wrath of the guy by sending someone else out to meet him, I think.
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Old 03-01-2016, 10:01 AM
ivylass ivylass is offline
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A buddy of mine was running a motor pool in Vietnam during the war. He was a CW2, Army.

As he tells it, one day he gets a call: "This is Captain such-and-so. Please send a car to pick me up."

That was a pretty ballsy request from a junior officer, so it got placed at the bottom f a long list.

Several hours later: "This is Captain S-a-so -- where the hell is my car?"

At that point my friend says something like, "Maybe you should just get your own transport, sir." And hangs up.

An hour later, in storms Navy Captain Such-and-So. (The Naval rank of Captain is a senior officer, O-6, as opposed to,the comparatively lowly Army O-3).

This wasn't a film error, but the SGT / MSG confusion reminded me of the story. My friend dodged the wrath of the guy by sending someone else out to meet him, I think.
Should he have identified himself as US Navy Captain? I know the ranks don't equal up (Navy Captain = Army Colonel) so I wonder how they keep the distinctions straight and give the proper respect across the services.
  #31  
Old 03-01-2016, 10:16 AM
DCnDC DCnDC is offline
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Should he have identified himself as US Navy Captain? I know the ranks don't equal up (Navy Captain = Army Colonel) so I wonder how they keep the distinctions straight and give the proper respect across the services.
He shouldn't have to. Even if a warrant officer has more years and experience than a junior officer, he must still respect the rank.
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Old 03-01-2016, 02:15 PM
terentii terentii is offline
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Should he have identified himself as US Navy Captain? I know the ranks don't equal up (Navy Captain = Army Colonel) so I wonder how they keep the distinctions straight and give the proper respect across the services.
That would have helped, I think. But such insubordination is bound to bring some wrath down upon your head in any case.
  #33  
Old 03-01-2016, 07:01 PM
alphaboi867 alphaboi867 is offline
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It's and its.

Their, they're and there.

It's "Chief Justice of the United States."

It's "the Court of St. James's."

And you can't be more or less unique - no modifiers. You're unique, or you're not.
On the same note it's attorneys-general, not attorney-generals. Lets not get started on crap like "PIN number" or "ATM machine".
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  #34  
Old 03-02-2016, 10:41 AM
terentii terentii is offline
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On the same note it's attorneys-general, not attorney-generals. Lets not get started on crap like "PIN number" or "ATM machine".
How about "courts-martial" and not "court-martials"?
  #35  
Old 02-29-2016, 06:09 PM
california jobcase california jobcase is offline
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Whenever I read someone is an alum, I wonder how he could be an aluminum potassium sulfate. Might he be used in pickles?

Finishing the word with -nus (or -na for a female) really wouldn't be that hard.

Last edited by california jobcase; 02-29-2016 at 06:10 PM.
  #36  
Old 02-29-2016, 11:26 PM
Rick Kitchen Rick Kitchen is offline
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Whenever I read someone is an alum, I wonder how he could be an aluminum potassium sulfate. Might he be used in pickles?

Finishing the word with -nus (or -na for a female) really wouldn't be that hard.
But that's the word that is used in general practice, that's not a mistake.
  #37  
Old 03-01-2016, 09:14 PM
Spectre of Pithecanthropus Spectre of Pithecanthropus is offline
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Whenever I read someone is an alum, I wonder how he could be an aluminum potassium sulfate. Might he be used in pickles?

Finishing the word with -nus (or -na for a female) really wouldn't be that hard.
But it is hard, actually. You'd have to remember to use the right gender, and then there's the problem of mixed groups. The Latin plurals are difficult as well, because the -i and ae suffixes sound the same in different systems of Latin pronunciation. You could probably say "alumnas" for the female plural, but "alumnuses" for the males sounds awkward IMHO.

As for being used in pickles, I never did consider that career possibility.
  #38  
Old 02-29-2016, 06:16 PM
Flyer Flyer is offline
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Why does every military beret look like someone threw a wool pizza on their head?
I thought that's what they more or less were.

The idea that a beret is useful or practical in any sense whatsoever is utterly laughable.
  #39  
Old 02-29-2016, 07:14 PM
terentii terentii is offline
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The idea that a beret is useful or practical in any sense whatsoever is utterly laughable.
The current Civil War (Union)--style US Army uniforms are not just laughable, they're hideous. Yecch!
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Old 03-01-2016, 11:46 AM
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The idea that a beret is useful or practical in any sense whatsoever is utterly laughable.
A few years ago (dozens) I combed my hair one morning as I had all my life, looked in the mirror and noticed for the first time that my hairstyle was actually a comb-over. So I said "fuck it" and redirected everything off the back. Much easier to maintain, although it left an expansive, expanding naked area on the top.

In Wyoming in July, a beret is good for protecting that spot if I go outside midday for more than an hour. In Wisconsin in February, the beret helps reduce the radiant heat loss that that exposed flesh is so good at. And in states that do not start with "W", it rolls up into a nice, compact thing that can fit in a jacket pocket.

Granted, it does not keep the rain off my glasses, but on the other hand, it takes a whole lot more wind to remove it from my head that most other hats can cling against. Even my fez leaps away before my beret does. So, yeah, a beret can indeed be useful and practical.
  #41  
Old 03-01-2016, 11:50 AM
billfish678 billfish678 is offline
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Hmmm...so in my golden years I will either have to pretend to be an EX Green Barret or convert to Judaism?

Not sure I can pull of the former...but sure as hell not giving up ham...

Last edited by billfish678; 03-01-2016 at 11:51 AM.
  #42  
Old 03-01-2016, 05:55 PM
eschereal eschereal is offline
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Hmmm...so in my golden years I will either have to pretend to be an EX Green Barret or convert to Judaism?

Not sure I can pull of the former...but sure as hell not giving up ham...
You could be a Parisian beatnique. If you can muster the gaul.
  #43  
Old 03-01-2016, 12:45 PM
ZPG Zealot ZPG Zealot is offline
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I thought that's what they more or less were.

The idea that a beret is useful or practical in any sense whatsoever is utterly laughable.
It keeps your head warm on a cold day and looks better (and more professional) than a ski cap How is that not useful or practical?
  #44  
Old 02-29-2016, 06:52 PM
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It drives me crazy when I hear someone use the word "worse" instead of "worst" (e.g. "worse case scenario"), but to be fair they do sound pretty similar.
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Old 02-29-2016, 07:48 PM
Seanette Seanette is offline
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Phrases like "should of", "off of", and so on. Substitution of "of" for "have" is bad enough, but "off of" is just awful, IMO.
  #46  
Old 02-29-2016, 10:44 PM
terentii terentii is offline
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Phrases like "should of", "off of", and so on. Substitution of "of" for "have" is bad enough, but "off of" is just awful, IMO.
[SCOTTISH ACCENT] Gi' us an example there, lass?

Last edited by terentii; 02-29-2016 at 10:48 PM.
  #47  
Old 02-29-2016, 07:58 PM
Ají de Gallina Ají de Gallina is offline
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I'm not mad it's always a red-tailed hawk. I'm mad every freaking time they show an eagle, hawk, or falcon, they screech.
Most digital cameras, apparently still make the sound of a film camera with an autowinder.
  #48  
Old 02-29-2016, 08:08 PM
j666 j666 is offline
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Whenever a grunt acknowledges a direct order with nothing more than a nod of his head. Of course, it would blow the entire budget if he said "Yes, sir!" or "Yes, Sergeant!"
Not the entire budget, no, but unless the Nameless Grunt is always the same actor, those little bits of realism can add up quickly.
  #49  
Old 02-29-2016, 08:40 PM
terentii terentii is offline
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Originally Posted by j666 View Post
Not the entire budget, no, but unless the Nameless Grunt is always the same actor, those little bits of realism can add up quickly.
So? Have the same guy be the nameless grunt in every such shot. In uniform, and with a quick makeup change, it's unlikely anyone would notice, especially since he'll be on screen for only three or four seconds at a time.
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Old 02-29-2016, 08:42 PM
Daylate Daylate is offline
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Originally Posted by Chefguy View Post
For a real nitpick: you don't pour concrete, you place it. Even when it's being pumped to the top of a building and comes sliding down a chute, it's being 'placed'. I suspect there are few outside of the construction game who know that.

Well, to be fair, it's not just movies or TV that does this, a quick Google search shows many instances of this, from Handyman magazine to Home Depot, to concretenetwork.com (in this case, the title is Pouring Concrete - How Concrete is Placed, but it still uses pouring in the article itself). It may be one of those common usage things that changes the definition of a word, like tragedy.
Gotta disagree with the OP. I was an engineer with a large consulting firm back in the day, and spent a lot of time as inspector on some huge concrete jobs (40,000+ yards). Almost always heard the word "pour" used instead of "placed". The word "placed" was used, but rarely.

I will say, one of the things that frosts my gourd is to hear a civilian refer to something like a "cement" sidewalk. It's a "concrete" sidewalk, dammit! "Cement" is what you put into the mix of sand, gravel, and water to make concrete.
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