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Old 03-15-2016, 11:20 AM
well he's back well he's back is offline
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What fiction films have had the greatest effects on the ‘real’ world?

I was thinking of “Jaws” and what an effect it had – I know many people who seriously would not swim in the ocean after that movie came out. What other fiction movies have had effects in or on the ‘real’ world?
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Old 03-15-2016, 11:26 AM
JoseB JoseB is offline
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I was thinking of “Jaws” and what an effect it had – I know many people who seriously would not swim in the ocean after that movie came out. What other fiction movies have had effects in or on the ‘real’ world?
I read somewhere that Hitchcock's "Psycho" had a similar effect with respect to showers...
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Old 03-15-2016, 11:33 AM
RivkahChaya RivkahChaya is offline
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Birth of a Nation. The KKK was pretty much defunct when the movie came out, but it caused renewed interest, and is responsible for the resurgence of the Klan that is still with us today.
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Old 03-15-2016, 11:36 AM
Tired and Cranky Tired and Cranky is offline
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Top Gun supposedly increased naval aviator recruiting by 500%. It certainly made flying for the Navy look fun.
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Old 03-15-2016, 11:51 AM
The Other Waldo Pepper The Other Waldo Pepper is offline
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Top Gun supposedly increased naval aviator recruiting by 500%. It certainly made flying for the Navy look fun.
IIRC, it was also credited with a big uptick in Air Force recruiting.
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Old 03-15-2016, 03:23 PM
drad dog drad dog is offline
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Birth of a Nation. The KKK was pretty much defunct when the movie came out, but it caused renewed interest, and is responsible for the resurgence of the Klan that is still with us today.
Yes. The real life Klan got the idea to burn crosses from the movie. They had never done it before. True.
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Old 03-15-2016, 03:40 PM
ivylass ivylass is offline
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Yes. The real life Klan got the idea to burn crosses from the movie. They had never done it before. True.
I don't know about that. Scots routinely burned crosses as a "calling of the clan." A lot of Scots emigrated to the States and that's probably how the custom got corrupted, as some yokel saw the symbolism and decided to make it their own.
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Old 03-15-2016, 04:25 PM
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I don't know about that. Scots routinely burned crosses as a "calling of the clan." A lot of Scots emigrated to the States and that's probably how the custom got corrupted, as some yokel saw the symbolism and decided to make it their own.
It has a Scottish history, but the KKKs actions are directly related to the movie.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cross_burning
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Old 03-15-2016, 12:22 PM
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I read somewhere that Hitchcock's "Psycho" had a similar effect with respect to showers...
It also wasn't that great for small privately-owned roadside motels.
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Old 03-16-2016, 10:32 AM
FairyChatMom FairyChatMom is offline
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I read somewhere that Hitchcock's "Psycho" had a similar effect with respect to showers...
My husband told me the because of Psycho, his mother won't shower if she's home alone.
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Old 03-15-2016, 11:44 AM
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"It Happened One Night." Clark Gable killed the undershirt industry for years.
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Old 03-15-2016, 12:01 PM
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The rescue of American astronauts by a Russian Cosmonaut in the 1969 film Marooned (based on the book by Martin Caidin, another of whose books inspired the TV series The Six Million Dollar Man) s said to have greased the skids for the Apollo-Soyuz linkup six years later. I know I've heard and read this many times before, and this website, for instance, takes it for granted ( http://www.tcm.com/tcmdb/title/23766.../articles.html ), as does the Internet Movie Database ( http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0064639/...ef_=tt_trv_trv )


The Wikipedia page on the film is oddly silent about this, except for this snippet in the "Talk" section:

Quote:
In a TV Guide article in the early summer of 1975, the interviewer quoted a Soviet as saying, "he thought all Americans had horns, until he read about Marooned". Indeed, it is conceivable that this movie gave a bit of a nudge to a project that probably had its roots with Kennedy and Krushchev talking about Kennedy's idea that they go to the moon together. It would be worth seeing what the state of talks between the countries were before and after this movie.

"Deke" Slayton claimed in his memoir that this film helped convince the Russians to undertake Apollo-Soyuz. (http://www.nytimes.com/1995/06/25/mo...pagewanted=all )


Edidently it influenced some Americans in the Space Program:

Quote:
Before he had an opportunity to talk with the Soviets, Handler saw a movie that influenced his thinking concerning manned space flight.


In the early spring of 1970, . . . I saw a special showing of the film Marooned in which . . . an American astronaut is marooned in orbit, unable to return to earth, and has a relatively limited oxygen supply remaining. While preparations are made on earth for rescue by NASA, a Soviet spacecraft is caused to change its course so as to closely approach the helpless American craft. A Soviet cosmonaut then undertakes a space walk and delivers some tanks of [10] oxygen to the marooned American permitting him to survive until the American rescue is possible.#

About a week before Handler's departure for the Soviet Union, he saw Tom Paine; Marooned was still in the back of his mind. During their conversation, Paine and Handler reviewed various possibilities for cooperation with the Soviets. Paine told him of his correspondence with Keldysh and urged Handler to press the discussion of this subject with the Soviets. Handler later reflected, "it was my clear intention to catalyze the process knowing full well that if I could secure agreement with the Soviet Academy to begin cooperative ventures seriously, from then on the negotiations would have to be directly with NASA."32

The two days that Handler spent in Moscow, 11-12 May 1970, were filled with talks on a broad range of topics relating to the whole realm of cooperation between the two scientific communities. At one point, Handler found an opportunity to discuss the question of space cooperation with President Keldysh, Dzhermen Mikhaylovich Gvishiani (Premier Kosygin's son-in-law and Deputy Minister for Science and Technology), and a group of younger Soviet scientists. Handler's approach was less tactful than that which had been pursued by NASA officials; "I confronted them with copies of a recent article in the New York Times and in Science magazine recounting the rather disgraceful history of their failure to react to the many initiatives offered by NASA." Handler urged closer cooperation by describing the basic scenario of the film Marooned. The fact that "an American film should portray a Soviet cosmonaut as the hero who saves an American's life came to them as a visible and distinct shock."
http://www.hq.nasa.gov/pao/History/SP-4209/prolog.htm

Last edited by CalMeacham; 03-15-2016 at 12:03 PM.
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Old 03-15-2016, 12:09 PM
billfish678 billfish678 is offline
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The movie China Syndrome probably almost single handedly killed the US nuclear power industry.
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Old 03-15-2016, 12:13 PM
RealityChuck RealityChuck is offline
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The movie China Syndrome probably almost single handedly killed the US nuclear power industry.
Three Mile Island had more to do with it, though the movie came out at the same time.

The Jazz Singer changed how we thought about movies.

Star Wars also changed the way Hollywood looked at movies.
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Old 03-15-2016, 12:16 PM
billfish678 billfish678 is offline
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Three Mile Island had more to do with it, though the movie came out at the same time.

The Jazz Singer changed how we thought about movies.

Star Wars also changed the way Hollywood looked at movies.
IMO one without the other wouldn't have nearly had the same effect. Talk about bad timing
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Old 03-15-2016, 12:40 PM
CalMeacham CalMeacham is offline
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The movie China Syndrome probably almost single handedly killed the US nuclear power industry.
I suspect that the Three Mile Island incident (which happened at the time of the film's release) probably had a lot more to do with putting a brake on nuclear power. The film, especially with the eerie coincidence of the timing, didn't help, though. But Real Life has a persuasive power that film lacks.
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Old 03-15-2016, 12:51 PM
RivkahChaya RivkahChaya is offline
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What about Philadelphia? For some reason, I think of that film as being more recent than it is, but it came out in 1993, which was still the "Silence=Death" era, really. How much effect did the film have on the AIDS landscape?
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Old 03-15-2016, 03:39 PM
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I suspect that the Three Mile Island incident (which happened at the time of the film's release) probably had a lot more to do with putting a brake on nuclear power. The film, especially with the eerie coincidence of the timing, didn't help, though. But Real Life has a persuasive power that film lacks.
Hard to say; I think that there was probably some synergistic effects going on there, in that the real-life event was about 2 weeks after the release of the somewhat controversial and popular movie and sort of primed the public for 3 Mile Island.

I kind of think either one in isolation wouldn't have been nearly so popular, for lack of a better term.
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Old 03-15-2016, 01:41 PM
DrDeth DrDeth is offline
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The movie China Syndrome probably almost single handedly killed the US nuclear power industry.

And put us on the path to unending Global Warming, too.
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Old 03-21-2016, 07:15 PM
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I think it influenced a number of things in the real world. If I remember right, the russian astronaut brought over the fresh bottle of 02, and it had a nonstandard plug in. Which meant A for effort, but did not help.

So it was instrumental in standardizing a bunch of different things, in space craft design on both sides.

Another was a book about the space shuttle having to do an abort, and landing on Easter Island, and having to come up with Passports, which at the time was never needed. So anything manned going up, had some sort of documentation if needed. In the book, they took the refueling probe off an A7 or F-8, as the 747 lifter, had no inflight capability. In the real world, I dont recall if the lifter has inflight capabilty.

Declan
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Old 03-15-2016, 12:16 PM
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Star Wars certainly influenced Reagan's Strategic Defense Initiative.
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Old 03-15-2016, 12:30 PM
Tired and Cranky Tired and Cranky is offline
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Star Wars certainly influenced Reagan's Strategic Defense Initiative.
Reagan was also inspired by WarGames to sign the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act in 1984. Congressmen started hearings on computer fraud bills by showing the opening of the film. It's basically a direct line from the film to legislation.

http://www.cnet.com/news/from-wargam...w-went-astray/
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Old 03-15-2016, 12:16 PM
Richard John Marcej Richard John Marcej is offline
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"101 Dalmations". After the film people began buying dalmatians for their families, not doing any research therefore not realizing that dalmatians are not good family pets.
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Old 03-15-2016, 01:46 PM
Morbo Morbo is offline
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"101 Dalmations". After the film people began buying dalmatians for their families, not doing any research therefore not realizing that dalmatians are not good family pets.
A similar thing happened with people adopting owls because of Harry Potter.
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Old 03-15-2016, 03:01 PM
ivylass ivylass is offline
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A similar thing happened with people adopting owls because of Harry Potter.
And clownfish after Finding Nemo and "setting them free" by flushing them down the toilet.
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Old 03-15-2016, 01:58 PM
DrDeth DrDeth is offline
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"101 Dalmations". After the film people began buying dalmatians for their families, not doing any research therefore not realizing that dalmatians are not good family pets.
Sez who?

http://animals.howstuffworks.com/pet...amily-dogs.htm


http://www.yourpurebredpuppy.com/rev...almatians.html

http://dogtime.com/dog-breeds/dalmatian

http://dalmatianbreed.com/do-they-make-good-pets/

But yes, research on any breed is critical. Dalmatians make good family pets- for the right family.
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Old 03-15-2016, 12:23 PM
ElvisL1ves ElvisL1ves is offline
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The combined Disney films eventually transformed the economy of central Florida.
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Old 03-15-2016, 12:28 PM
Uniqueorn Uniqueorn is offline
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Star Wars created a religion.
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Old 03-15-2016, 12:37 PM
Drunky Smurf Drunky Smurf is offline
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Star Wars created a religion.
So did The Big Lebowski. Dudeism.

https://www.google.com/search?q=dude...HU5LB-gQsAQIOQ
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Old 03-15-2016, 12:30 PM
ElvisL1ves ElvisL1ves is offline
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There are now intercollegiate Quidditch leagues.
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Old 03-15-2016, 01:57 PM
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Capricorn One may have started, or at least spurred on, the Moon landing hoax nonsense.
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Old 03-15-2016, 02:13 PM
billfish678 billfish678 is offline
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Capricorn One may have started, or at least spurred on, the Moon landing hoax nonsense.
Good one.
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Old 03-15-2016, 02:24 PM
Bryan Ekers Bryan Ekers is offline
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Capricorn One may have started, or at least spurred on, the Moon landing hoax nonsense.
Hey, he said fiction!



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Old 03-31-2016, 08:02 AM
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Capricorn One may have started, or at least spurred on, the Moon landing hoax nonsense.
That existed before the film, but it probably did create a lot more believers.

I'm not sure which film really started the whole comic book movie boom, but I'd lay money on the first Tobey McGuire Spider-man movie. There were a few false starts before that (Superman, and Batman had some good starts, but then a few bad movies put a temporary halt to those franchises). The next year after Spider-man 3, gave us Hulk (a false start to the MCU), not too long after, we got Batman Begins, etc.
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Old 03-31-2016, 02:00 PM
CalMeacham CalMeacham is offline
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That existed before the film, but it probably did create a lot more believers.

.

Are you quite certain of that? If so, I'd like to see a cite. I myself did not hear any significant conspiracy "movement" about Moon Landing Hoax until well after Capricorn One came out. I suspect myself that the movie significantly contributed to the belief.


(There are some people who seem to think the "Moon Landing Simulator" scenes in the 1971 James Bond film Diamonds are Forever represent a depiction of such a Moon Landing Hoax. But there's no suggestion of it in the film. I was around then, and saw the film when it first came out. There's no implication that this is anything but a practice run or simulation. And I don't recall people talking about such Faked Moon Landings at the time, either. )
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Old 03-31-2016, 09:51 PM
Wendell Wagner Wendell Wagner is offline
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Here's a history of moon landing conspiracy theories:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moon_l...iracy_theories

The first book making the claim that it was a hoax was in 1974. In 1977 a Hare Krishna magazine made the claim that it was a hoax. In the 1970's it was common for people in Latin America, Asia, and Africa to believe that it was a hoax. This may have been because Cuba was sending teachers abroad that told them it was so. It was probably more common in third world countries than in the U.S. at that point. Right up to today there are people who believe it. I think that the claim started shortly after the moon landing and grew slowly for decades. Capricorn One was only one part of the popularity of the theory.
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Old 03-31-2016, 09:52 PM
Wendell Wagner Wendell Wagner is offline
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Can anyone find a link to the results of polls over a long period asking people if they believe in the theory?
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Old 04-01-2016, 07:05 AM
CalMeacham CalMeacham is offline
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Here's a history of moon landing conspiracy theories:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moon_l...iracy_theories

The first book making the claim that it was a hoax was in 1974. In 1977 a Hare Krishna magazine made the claim that it was a hoax. In the 1970's it was common for people in Latin America, Asia, and Africa to believe that it was a hoax. This may have been because Cuba was sending teachers abroad that told them it was so. It was probably more common in third world countries than in the U.S. at that point. Right up to today there are people who believe it. I think that the claim started shortly after the moon landing and grew slowly for decades. Capricorn One was only one part of the popularity of the theory.
I don't doubt that there were people claiming it in 1974 -- there are people who will believe and make up just about any conspiracy theory. The question is whether it was widely believed before Capricorn One in 1978. I certainly don't recall anything like the widespread attraction of the theory back before that film, or even for some time afterwards.

Note that the first book about it being in 1974 sort of undercuts the suggestion (made in The Big Book of Conspiracies ) that the scene in the 1971 movie Diamonds are Forever was intended to be a depiction of the Moon Landing Hoax in action.

I've checked the Google Ngram viewer, but it doesn't seem to help in finding any references to the Moon Landing Hoax (or similar words). Google Books hasn't picked up anything before the late 1990s.

Last edited by CalMeacham; 04-01-2016 at 07:06 AM.
  #40  
Old 04-01-2016, 08:28 AM
The Other Waldo Pepper The Other Waldo Pepper is offline
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I'm not sure which film really started the whole comic book movie boom, but I'd lay money on the first Tobey McGuire Spider-man movie. There were a few false starts before that (Superman, and Batman had some good starts, but then a few bad movies put a temporary halt to those franchises).
X-MEN -- with Oscar-caliber actors, yellow-spandex joke, and Stan Lee cameo -- had already been a big enough hit as to get a franchise-tastic sequel greenlit well before Tobey Maguire's first outing as Spidey hit theaters, doing wonders for Hugh Jackman's career and not so much for James Marsden.
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Old 03-15-2016, 03:03 PM
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Easy Rider had a huge cultural impact.
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Old 03-15-2016, 03:13 PM
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After the release of the film Sideways (2004), sales of Merlot dropped by 2%, while Pinot Noir sales increased 16%.
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Old 03-15-2016, 03:20 PM
CalMeacham CalMeacham is offline
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This is a minor thing, but I swear I never noticed anyone leaving stones or pebbles on tombs or memorials until they showed people doing that to Oskar Schindler's tomb at the end of Schindler's List. Now I see it everywhere.


It's possible that the film merely brought it to my attention, but I don't think so. I don't recall seeing it earlier, and it stood out when I saw the film simply because it was a practice I'd never seen or heard of before. I gather than leaving Memorial Stones is an old Jewish practice, but I don't think other groups did it until the film popularized the idea.

Now I see it frequently at memorials. In particular, the Holocaust Memorial in Boston invariably has stones heaped upon the granite portions.
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Old 03-15-2016, 03:21 PM
DrDeth DrDeth is offline
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This is a minor thing, but I swear I never noticed anyone leaving stones or pebbles on tombs or memorials until they showed people doing that to Oskar Schindler's tomb at the end of Schindler's List. Now I see it everywhere.


It's possible that the film merely brought it to my attention, but I don't think so. I don't recall seeing it earlier, and it stood out when I saw the film simply because it was a practice I'd never seen or heard of before. I gather than leaving Memorial Stones is an old Jewish practice, but I don't think other groups did it until the film popularized the idea.

Now I see it frequently at memorials. In particular, the Holocaust Memorial in Boston invariably has stones heaped upon the granite portions.
why?
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Old 03-15-2016, 03:26 PM
CalMeacham CalMeacham is offline
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why?
Why what?

Why do they do it?

As I say, it's an old Jewish tradition, apparently:
http://www.jcam.org/Pages/Foundation...tionstones.htm

But it's not an old tradition for most other folks. You didn't see a lot of this elsewhere. But Schindler's List brought the notion to people's attention, so now they know about it. And, being an easy thing to do (stones are always nearby), a lot more people have started doiing it. I see stones placed at the SAlem Witch memorials -- which aren't Jewish. I see them of random historic tombstones.


The Boston Holocaust Memorial went up two years after Schindler's List, so I have no "control" data. But, ever since it went up, I see stones there. And I suspect that not only Jewish people are leaving them there.
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Old 03-27-2016, 07:40 AM
Claverhouse Claverhouse is offline
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This is a minor thing, but I swear I never noticed anyone leaving stones or pebbles on tombs or memorials until they showed people doing that to Oskar Schindler's tomb at the end of Schindler's List. Now I see it everywhere.


It's possible that the film merely brought it to my attention, but I don't think so. I don't recall seeing it earlier, and it stood out when I saw the film simply because it was a practice I'd never seen or heard of before. I gather than leaving Memorial Stones is an old Jewish practice, but I don't think other groups did it until the film popularized the idea.

Now I see it frequently at memorials. In particular, the Holocaust Memorial in Boston invariably has stones heaped upon the granite portions.

It is most rooted in Scottish tradition, possibly for several 1000 years. Maybe they copied it from the Scots. Cairns were, rather slowly, built through singular additions. There's a saying, "Cuiridh mi clach air do charn" ---"I will put a stone on your cairn". People have been adding stones --- or stanes --- all over Scotland non-stop all the time.


At 2nd Inverlochy, 1645, Montrose gave Argyll's people a very well-deserved hiding, and since every passing MacDonald must add a stone, and every Campbell --- hopefully well penitent --- must subtract one.


I would be pretty certain that all this started in the Cradle of Civilisation,the Middle East many 1000s of years ago. There are a lot of stone structures there.
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  #47  
Old 03-27-2016, 10:12 AM
Jeff Lichtman Jeff Lichtman is offline
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There's a saying, "Cuiridh mi clach air do charn" ---"I will put a stone on your cairn".
Didn't Nikita Krushchev say something like that?
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Old 03-28-2016, 10:34 AM
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It is most rooted in Scottish tradition, possibly for several 1000 years. Maybe they copied it from the Scots. Cairns were, rather slowly, built through singular additions. There's a saying, "Cuiridh mi clach air do charn" ---"I will put a stone on your cairn". People have been adding stones --- or stanes --- all over Scotland non-stop all the time.


At 2nd Inverlochy, 1645, Montrose gave Argyll's people a very well-deserved hiding, and since every passing MacDonald must add a stone, and every Campbell --- hopefully well penitent --- must subtract one.


I would be pretty certain that all this started in the Cradle of Civilisation,the Middle East many 1000s of years ago. There are a lot of stone structures there.
One mountain near where I live has at least three separate cairns - all of which are built as fairly neat columns instead of rock-piles. Each is around six feet tall. They don't show up well on Google Maps or I'd post a link.
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Old 03-28-2016, 11:31 AM
CalMeacham CalMeacham is offline
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Originally Posted by Claverhouse View Post
It is most rooted in Scottish tradition, possibly for several 1000 years. Maybe they copied it from the Scots. Cairns were, rather slowly, built through singular additions. There's a saying, "Cuiridh mi clach air do charn" ---"I will put a stone on your cairn". People have been adding stones --- or stanes --- all over Scotland non-stop all the time.


At 2nd Inverlochy, 1645, Montrose gave Argyll's people a very well-deserved hiding, and since every passing MacDonald must add a stone, and every Campbell --- hopefully well penitent --- must subtract one.


I would be pretty certain that all this started in the Cradle of Civilisation,the Middle East many 1000s of years ago. There are a lot of stone structures there.

I'm familiar with cairns and the process of adding to them, but I maintain this modern practice of placing stones atop monuments which are already complete, and made of large dressed stones, is completely different.

With traditional cairns, the small stone you add is virtually indistinguishable from the ones making up the rest of the pile.

But this modern practice has people putting smaller stones, utterly unlike those making up the monument, atop the monument itself. They're not adding just another stone to the cairn. They're placing an extra alien element to a monument.

In that sense, putting a pebble on a monument is more like leaving, say, a tree on top of a cairn. You could say you're adding to the pile, but what you're adding ain't the same.
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Old 04-08-2016, 12:55 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CalMeacham View Post
This is a minor thing, but I swear I never noticed anyone leaving stones or pebbles on tombs or memorials until they showed people doing that to Oskar Schindler's tomb at the end of Schindler's List. Now I see it everywhere.

It's possible that the film merely brought it to my attention, but I don't think so. I don't recall seeing it earlier, and it stood out when I saw the film simply because it was a practice I'd never seen or heard of before. I gather than leaving Memorial Stones is an old Jewish practice, but I don't think other groups did it until the film popularized the idea.
The Cadet I knew at West Point knew that people did it for the grave of David Marcus, "as a mark of respect", but thought it had nothing to do with his faith/culture.
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