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Old 08-16-2016, 10:57 AM
amaguri amaguri is offline
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One Weird Trick... That actually works?

The thread about stupid clickbait ads made me wonder if people have any "weird tricks" that actually work?

The one that comes to mind for me is using toothpaste to clean foggy/hazy headlights. Works like magic! I'm sure any paste with very fine grit works similarly but toothpaste is handy and smells good
  #2  
Old 08-16-2016, 11:00 AM
Amateur Barbarian Amateur Barbarian is offline
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Start with the "Hints from Heloise" column and books, ca. 1940. Recycle to the present day.
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Old 08-16-2016, 01:54 PM
Quercus Quercus is offline
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How about making peeling garlic easy-as-pie by smooshing the clove first?
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Old 08-17-2016, 05:59 AM
Count Blucher Count Blucher is offline
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How about making peeling garlic easy-as-pie by smooshing the clove first?
Someone reminded me the other day that if you want to grow your own garlic, you plant a clove per plant... but you always plant them in the Fall.
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Old 08-16-2016, 02:08 PM
billfish678 billfish678 is offline
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I'm just amazed that it is always MY town where these brilliant people have figured this stuff out. I must live in the Eureka of the Deep South.

Heating lemons in a the microwave for a bit does seem to help in getting the juice out.

I had to work with some epoxy the other day. Invariably I got some on me. My usual go to for getting gunk like that off is mineral spirits or gasoline or acetone or whatever other nasty solvent is handy. Often with on so so results.

I recently read somewhere that white vinegar worked. Well damn if it didn't remove that stuff better than most things I've used before. And its dirt cheap a gallon at a time too. Will try that from now on for most nasty expoxies, glues, and paints from now on first.
  #6  
Old 08-16-2016, 11:11 PM
Trinopus Trinopus is offline
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So what works to take off the residue of sticky-gum when you've peeled the price-tag off the front of a paperback book?

I've been using WD-40, which works...sorta, kinda, maybe, a little.

Parking: Swing wide, so the corner of your car is really close to the car in the next space, then swing inward again. (I ought to draw a picture...) Instead of trying to head directly in to the space, you head "across" the space, to the far side. When you straighten out from this, you're in the center of the space, and aligned with it.
  #7  
Old 08-16-2016, 11:30 PM
snoe snoe is offline
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So what works to take off the residue of sticky-gum when you've peeled the price-tag off the front of a paperback book?

I've been using WD-40, which works...sorta, kinda, maybe, a little.
A product called Goo Gone was our go-to for sticker residue at the bookstore, but watch out if the surface is glossy - it can dull the finish of the area you use it on.

A plain old pencil eraser is good for non-sticky smudges on book covers.
  #8  
Old 08-17-2016, 12:11 AM
keturah keturah is offline
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Originally Posted by Trinopus View Post
So what works to take off the residue of sticky-gum when you've peeled the price-tag off the front of a paperback book?

I've been using WD-40, which works...sorta, kinda, maybe, a little.

Parking: Swing wide, so the corner of your car is really close to the car in the next space, then swing inward again. (I ought to draw a picture...) Instead of trying to head directly in to the space, you head "across" the space, to the far side. When you straighten out from this, you're in the center of the space, and aligned with it.
Rubbing alcohol-aka isopropyl alcohol.
  #9  
Old 08-17-2016, 12:22 AM
panache45 panache45 is online now
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So what works to take off the residue of sticky-gum when you've peeled the price-tag off the front of a paperback book?
Go to an art supply store, and get a can of rubber cement thinner. I use it for all sorts of things. (Being an artist, I always have some, in a convenient dispenser.)
  #10  
Old 08-17-2016, 07:02 AM
Doug K. Doug K. is online now
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Originally Posted by Trinopus View Post
So what works to take off the residue of sticky-gum when you've peeled the price-tag off the front of a paperback book?

I've been using WD-40, which works...sorta, kinda, maybe, a little.

Parking: Swing wide, so the corner of your car is really close to the car in the next space, then swing inward again. (I ought to draw a picture...) Instead of trying to head directly in to the space, you head "across" the space, to the far side. When you straighten out from this, you're in the center of the space, and aligned with it.
That's going to depend on the the turning ratio of your car, the length of your car, and whether the spots are angled. Try that with my Buick and straight in (90 degree) spots and you're hitting the car in the next space unless you stop and back up a bit.
  #11  
Old 08-17-2016, 04:53 PM
Trinopus Trinopus is offline
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That's going to depend on the the turning ratio of your car, the length of your car, and whether the spots are angled. Try that with my Buick and straight in (90 degree) spots and you're hitting the car in the next space unless you stop and back up a bit.
You'd be doing it wrong, then. The idea is for the corner of your car to come very close to the other guy's car, so that, in the last couple of feet, you swing away from it again, placing you right in the center of your space and aligned with it.

If you naively aim directly for the center of the space, your trailing hind corner will come too close to the car on the trailing side, and you'll be off-center in the space, too close to that guy.
  #12  
Old 08-17-2016, 06:28 PM
Doug K. Doug K. is online now
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You'd be doing it wrong, then. The idea is for the corner of your car to come very close to the other guy's car, so that, in the last couple of feet, you swing away from it again, placing you right in the center of your space and aligned with it.

If you naively aim directly for the center of the space, your trailing hind corner will come too close to the car on the trailing side, and you'll be off-center in the space, too close to that guy.
That might work for your car, but it won't for mine. We have three vehicles, and each one requires a unique strategy to end up in the spot correctly and efficiently. In one of them aiming for the center of the space is the ONLY strategy that ends with the car properly centered.
  #13  
Old 08-19-2016, 12:12 PM
CookingWithGas CookingWithGas is offline
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Originally Posted by Trinopus View Post
Parking: Swing wide, so the corner of your car is really close to the car in the next space, then swing inward again. (I ought to draw a picture...) Instead of trying to head directly in to the space, you head "across" the space, to the far side. When you straighten out from this, you're in the center of the space, and aligned with it.
Good advice. Most people driving a car are only aware of the part of their car in front of them, forgetting that there is a whole lot more behind them. The guide the front wheels to the destination, which doesn't work.
  #14  
Old 08-19-2016, 12:18 PM
CookingWithGas CookingWithGas is offline
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Tired of your bananas ripening too fast?

As they ripen they give off a gas (I forget the name).
Ethylene. Many fruits emit ethylene as they ripen, and in turn the ethylene speeds the ripening process. So put ripe bananas next to the green ones.
  #15  
Old 08-22-2016, 04:15 PM
Blue Blistering Barnacle Blue Blistering Barnacle is offline
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I'm just amazed that it is always MY town where these brilliant people have figured this stuff out. I must live in the Eureka of the Deep South.

Heating lemons in a the microwave for a bit does seem to help in getting the juice out.

I had to work with some epoxy the other day. Invariably I got some on me. My usual go to for getting gunk like that off is mineral spirits or gasoline or acetone or whatever other nasty solvent is handy. Often with on so so results.

I recently read somewhere that white vinegar worked. Well damn if it didn't remove that stuff better than most things I've used before. And its dirt cheap a gallon at a time too. Will try that from now on for most nasty expoxies, glues, and paints from now on first.
Vegetable oil is great for cleaning up paints and stains. I don't know if it works on epoxy. I'd recommend the cheaper corn oil, not the extra virgin olive oil.

I've never tried vinegar, though. Would that work on paint?
  #16  
Old 08-24-2016, 01:29 PM
Doctor Jackson Doctor Jackson is offline
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Vegetable oil is great for cleaning up paints and stains. I don't know if it works on epoxy. I'd recommend the cheaper corn oil, not the extra virgin olive oil.
In patching my roof a few years ago, I got roofing tar on my hands. That stuff is like road tar in that it is very difficult to get off skin. I was out of mineral spirits, which does the trick nicely, so I was scrounging around the house for something that might work. In my wife's bathroom I saw baby oil. My thoughts went like this: Baby oil is nothing but mineral oil with perfume. Mineral spirits is a less refined version of mineral oil. Both are petroleum distillates. Hmm.

I poured some baby oil on my hands and - voila! - it took the roofing tar (also a petroleum based substance) right off. My next thought was "We put this stuff on baby's butts?!?!"
  #17  
Old 08-24-2016, 05:10 PM
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Cooking/shucking corn. Leave the husk and silk intact. Grill or nuke the corn. When it's hot, cut off the thick end of the cob, squeeze from the silk end until the ear pops out from the cut end. Throw away the silk and husk in one chunk.
  #18  
Old 08-25-2016, 06:40 PM
Sunny Daze Sunny Daze is offline
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Cooking/shucking corn. Leave the husk and silk intact. Grill or nuke the corn. When it's hot, cut off the thick end of the cob, squeeze from the silk end until the ear pops out from the cut end. Throw away the silk and husk in one chunk.
I'm using this one.
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Old 09-12-2016, 01:13 PM
TheseGoToEleven TheseGoToEleven is offline
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Cooking/shucking corn. Leave the husk and silk intact. Grill or nuke the corn. When it's hot, cut off the thick end of the cob, squeeze from the silk end until the ear pops out from the cut end. Throw away the silk and husk in one chunk.
Worked like a charm - even better than I expected! Maybe two stray silk strands left behind, which I'd say is less than the usual count on corn shucked the the old-fashioned way. And way less mess!

Just be sure to cut off enough of the bottom, and wear an oven mitt or use a towel when performing the squeeze. That corn is HOT, and the bare-handed approach is quickly deprecated in practice...
  #20  
Old 08-24-2016, 07:07 PM
jsgoddess jsgoddess is offline
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My next thought was "We put this stuff on baby's butts?!?!"
I didn't think people were still keeping it around the house after the aspiration dangers became known.
  #21  
Old 08-25-2016, 09:31 AM
Doctor Jackson Doctor Jackson is offline
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I didn't think people were still keeping it around the house after the aspiration dangers became known.
Like any other petroleum distillate, it should be kept out of the reach of children and only used externally (though swallowing presents no danger - it has been used a laxative for many years). The overall risk is quite small, and certainly not enough for people to ban baby oil from their homes any more than they would ban gasoline, furniture polish, paint thinners, etc.
  #22  
Old 09-06-2016, 09:14 AM
Whiskey Dickens Whiskey Dickens is offline
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I didn't think people were still keeping it around the house after the aspiration dangers became known.

I was about to jump in to say "what aspiration dangers? Are you thinking of baby POWDER instead?"

I googled baby oil aspiration before posting just to be sure, and all I have to say is holy shit!

Never would have guessed! Ignorance fought!
  #23  
Old 09-06-2016, 11:17 AM
betterlifethroughchemistry betterlifethroughchemistry is offline
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Originally Posted by billfish678 View Post
I'm just amazed that it is always MY town where these brilliant people have figured this stuff out. I must live in the Eureka of the Deep South.

Heating lemons in a the microwave for a bit does seem to help in getting the juice out.

I had to work with some epoxy the other day. Invariably I got some on me. My usual go to for getting gunk like that off is mineral spirits or gasoline or acetone or whatever other nasty solvent is handy. Often with on so so results.

I recently read somewhere that white vinegar worked. Well damn if it didn't remove that stuff better than most things I've used before. And its dirt cheap a gallon at a time too. Will try that from now on for most nasty expoxies, glues, and paints from now on first.
We make high-end, OEM adhesives and sealants for energy and electronics applications. There are multiple chemical resistance tests some of our materials have to pass, and one in particular is a UL test which includes resistance to 10% acetic acid, which is essentially vinegar. If not formulated properly, the 10% acetic acid will destroy an epoxy compound in days where strong organic solvents won't touch them.
  #24  
Old 08-17-2016, 02:10 AM
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Terry Moore did a three minute TED talk where he describes a superior way to tie shoelaces. The problem arose when his pair of shoes with slick laces refused to stay tied.

It's a small trick but it's a stronger form of the traditional knot.
  #25  
Old 08-17-2016, 07:28 AM
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Terry Moore did a three minute TED talk where he describes a superior way to tie shoelaces. The problem arose when his pair of shoes with slick laces refused to stay tied.

It's a small trick but it's a stronger form of the traditional knot.
I learned this from these very pages a few years ago and it is amazing. I no longer double-knot my laces yet they rarely come undone. One small improvement on the TED presentation. In the video Terry Moore tells you to reverse step #2 of lace-tying, making the bow. Much less awkward is to reverse step #1, the initial crossover-and-under. The result is the same but I believe it takes much less effort to unlearn-relearn.

In a similar vein is this magic way to fold t-shirts. I think this comes originally from Japan but I have linked to an English language version. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BAxhr0j0thY
  #26  
Old 08-22-2016, 02:30 PM
amarinth amarinth is online now
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Terry Moore did a three minute TED talk where he describes a superior way to tie shoelaces. The problem arose when his pair of shoes with slick laces refused to stay tied.

It's a small trick but it's a stronger form of the traditional knot.
Am I the only person for whom this doesn't work? A square knot may be more secure than a granny knot (between macrame & tatting, I know the difference), but my shoelaces still end up untying themselves.
  #27  
Old 08-22-2016, 03:05 PM
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Am I the only person for whom this doesn't work? A square knot may be more secure than a granny knot (between macrame & tatting, I know the difference), but my shoelaces still end up untying themselves.
Same here, I watched the video hoping for a fix, and found that I've already been doing it the "correct" way.
  #28  
Old 09-15-2016, 01:19 PM
jtur88 jtur88 is offline
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Originally Posted by bleach View Post
Terry Moore did a three minute TED talk where he describes a superior way to tie shoelaces. The problem arose when his pair of shoes with slick laces refused to stay tied.

It's a small trick but it's a stronger form of the traditional knot.
I've been tying my shoes Moore's way for more than 70 years. How did my mother know so much? My shoes never come untied unless the laces are too long and I step on the ends.

What he described is basically a Granny with loops, and by reversing the overhandedness of one of the steps, it become the square knot it is supposed to be, with loops.

Last edited by jtur88; 09-15-2016 at 01:20 PM.
  #29  
Old 08-17-2016, 07:43 AM
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Terry Moore did a three minute TED talk where he describes a superior way to tie shoelaces. The problem arose when his pair of shoes with slick laces refused to stay tied.

It's a small trick but it's a stronger form of the traditional knot.
I watched that a few years ago and implemented it. Previously, my laces would untie fairly often. Since my change per his instruction, it hasn't happened once. I still haven't told my parents though.
  #30  
Old 09-08-2016, 12:42 PM
Nars Glinley Nars Glinley is offline
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I watched that a few years ago and implemented it. Previously, my laces would untie fairly often. Since my change per his instruction, it hasn't happened once. I still haven't told my parents though.
I tie the traditional knot but go around my thumb twice. They never come untied until you pull on a loose end.
  #31  
Old 09-15-2016, 08:32 PM
OffByOne OffByOne is offline
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I watched that a few years ago and implemented it. Previously, my laces would untie fairly often. Since my change per his instruction, it hasn't happened once. I still haven't told my parents though.
About 8 years ago, I was having problems with my shoes coming untied. Google to the rescue!

What I learned that day matched the TED talk video. The problem was that I was already tying my laces the correct way. (The correct way is to tie them as if you were making a square knot -- right over left, left over right.) Then I began to realize that if there is insufficient tension at the bottom of the knot, the knot can come undone on its own. Snugging up the laces before you start tying the knot helps, but I still have to pull the starting knot tight before completing the bows, else I will find myself retying my shoes.
  #32  
Old 08-18-2016, 01:59 PM
FluffyBob FluffyBob is offline
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Or just learn to back in. There is good reason people in big pick ups / vans often do it this way. Steering with the trailing wheels is far superior for parking in a tight spot. As a bonus you can actually see what you are dping when you leave.

You either have to back in or out. Out makes a lot more sense.
  #33  
Old 08-18-2016, 02:54 PM
MrSquishy MrSquishy is offline
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Or just learn to back in. There is good reason people in big pick ups / vans often do it this way. Steering with the trailing wheels is far superior for parking in a tight spot. As a bonus you can actually see what you are dping when you leave.

You either have to back in or out. Out makes a lot more sense.
I think you meant "in".
  #34  
Old 08-18-2016, 04:12 PM
Trinopus Trinopus is offline
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Or just learn to back in. . . .
Very difficult when the spaces are angled toward on-coming traffic. To back in, you have to reverse direction, which takes extra time and also extra space, blocking oncoming traffic, and even preventing someone behind you from going around you. It's glaringly less efficient for angled spaces.
  #35  
Old 08-18-2016, 09:15 PM
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A lot of those Life Hack lists suggest you peel a banana "upside down" i.e. not from the stem but by pinching the bottom and I am here to tell you that works and is how I peel bananas now.
  #36  
Old 08-19-2016, 08:17 AM
billfish678 billfish678 is offline
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Tired of your bananas ripening too fast?

As they ripen they give off a gas (I forget the name). AND the presence of that gas speeds ripening as well. So you kinda have a feedback loop there.

Well, when you have them in a bunch, they are interconnected to each other and more sealed up, so the gas is more "trapped".

Cut each banana from the bunch. Now they are no longer connected and the gas can escape through the stem. Probably helps to make the cut stem shorter as well.

Or at at least I recall it working when I tried it awhile back. Never actually did a scientific comparision...
  #37  
Old 08-18-2016, 03:07 PM
Siam Sam Siam Sam is offline
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I'm no cook, so I've not tried this myself. But I understand that peeling onions under water in the sink will eliminate the "crying" or tears effect.
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Old 08-19-2016, 09:00 AM
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I'm no cook, so I've not tried this myself. But I understand that peeling onions under water in the sink will eliminate the "crying" or tears effect.
Keep your knives really sharp and it won't be too much of an issue with most onions anyway. Every now and then you'll get an super pungent onion, but for probably 19/20 a good and sharp knife will do the trick, and keep your eyes from watering even if you're cutting up 2-3 onions at a time.
  #39  
Old 08-22-2016, 03:09 PM
Chefguy Chefguy is offline
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Keep your knives really sharp and it won't be too much of an issue with most onions anyway. Every now and then you'll get an super pungent onion, but for probably 19/20 a good and sharp knife will do the trick, and keep your eyes from watering even if you're cutting up 2-3 onions at a time.
Another way to reduce the tears is to dice the onion properly. Most people peel the skin off, then slice the onion up, then dice the slices. This exposes you to large areas of onion.

A proper dice (for me) is done by slicing off the ends and peeling of the first layer, of course. Then set the onion on its end and with a sharp knife, slice the onion most of the way through in the desired width, proceeding across the entire onion. Then rotate the onion 90 degrees and do the same. This creates an in situ dice. Then turn the onion on its side and rapidly cut across your previous slicing to produce the dice you want. Videos I've seen want you to cut the onion in half first, but it seems more likely that you can cut yourself doing it that way, as it requires you to do horizontal cuts.
  #40  
Old 08-23-2016, 09:43 AM
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Another way to reduce the tears is to dice the onion properly. Most people peel the skin off, then slice the onion up, then dice the slices. This exposes you to large areas of onion.

A proper dice (for me) is done by slicing off the ends and peeling of the first layer, of course. Then set the onion on its end and with a sharp knife, slice the onion most of the way through in the desired width, proceeding across the entire onion. Then rotate the onion 90 degrees and do the same. This creates an in situ dice. Then turn the onion on its side and rapidly cut across your previous slicing to produce the dice you want. Videos I've seen want you to cut the onion in half first, but it seems more likely that you can cut yourself doing it that way, as it requires you to do horizontal cuts.
Unless you're really set on having exactly square dice, I've always found it best to cut the onion in half, take off the skin, cut off the non-root end, lay the onion half on the cutting board, cut side down, and start making radial cuts with your knife point toward the root end (leave the root end on- it holds the onion together as you cut). Then, once you've made as many radial cuts as you want, turn the onion 90 degrees sideways and cut down across those radial cuts, making not-quite-square or exactly even dice, but with no horizontal cutting step.

Radial cuts vs. vertical/horizontal cuts.
  #41  
Old 08-23-2016, 10:41 AM
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Unless you're really set on having exactly square dice, I've always found it best to cut the onion in half, take off the skin, cut off the non-root end, lay the onion half on the cutting board, cut side down, and start making radial cuts with your knife point toward the root end (leave the root end on- it holds the onion together as you cut). Then, once you've made as many radial cuts as you want, turn the onion 90 degrees sideways and cut down across those radial cuts, making not-quite-square or exactly even dice, but with no horizontal cutting step.

Radial cuts vs. vertical/horizontal cuts.
Same idea, certainly, and probably less dangerous than my method since the onion can't roll on you.
  #42  
Old 09-15-2016, 01:22 PM
jtur88 jtur88 is offline
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I'm no cook, so I've not tried this myself. But I understand that peeling onions under water in the sink will eliminate the "crying" or tears effect.
Just keep them in the fridge. No tears when peeling or cutting cold onions.
  #43  
Old 08-19-2016, 12:30 PM
IvoryTowerDenizen IvoryTowerDenizen is online now
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Using waxed dental floss for getting a stuck ring off your finger.
  #44  
Old 08-19-2016, 01:53 PM
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Using waxed dental floss for getting a stuck ring off your finger.
How does that work?
  #45  
Old 08-19-2016, 01:56 PM
Shagnasty Shagnasty is offline
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How does that work?
You compress the skin in front of the ring by wrapping it tightly in dental floss and then unwinding it as the ring moves forward.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rQ2HO1loieA
  #46  
Old 08-19-2016, 02:05 PM
enipla enipla is online now
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Put bananas in the fridge. The skin will still blacken, but the fruit will be fine.
  #47  
Old 08-22-2016, 01:16 PM
bump bump is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by enipla View Post
Put bananas in the fridge. The skin will still blacken, but the fruit will be fine.
There's a caveat though; you only put them in when they're as ripe as you want them to be; the ripening process is pretty much wrecked by the cold, so even if you take them back out, they probably won't continue to ripen.
  #48  
Old 08-22-2016, 03:03 PM
scr4 scr4 is online now
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If you have a stack of coffee filters (of the "basket" type, not the cone-shaped ones), turn the whole stack inside out, then back again. This makes it much easier to pick one filter off the stack. (Just like bending or fanning a ream of paper before putting it into a copier/printer)
  #49  
Old 08-23-2016, 11:52 AM
Personal Personal is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scr4 View Post
Same here, I watched the video hoping for a fix, and found that I've already been doing it the "correct" way.
I can say with complete confidence that in the three years or so that I have been doing it, it has not failed me, even once.
  #50  
Old 08-23-2016, 11:59 AM
Quint Quint is offline
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If you need to get rust off of old chrome, tinfoil dipped in water works like a miracle.
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