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Old 11-30-2016, 07:52 AM
Darren Garrison Darren Garrison is offline
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Fire ants on the decline in the US?

Fire ants first started becoming common here in South Carolina in the late 80s/early 90s. They used to be everywhere, and no matter how much poison you used on the mounds, it wasn't long before a new mound popped up. They are so small that you can't keep them out of your house with anything short of an airlock, and they know how to cut their way into unopened food packages. They would build small nests in electronics (for the warmth.) I'd hate to guess how many hundreds of times I've been stung by them, both inside and out. And it became a rare novelty to see a "normal" larger, non-stinging native ant. They were little short of a biblical-level plague.

And yet, in the past few years I see only a small fraction as many as I used to, either mounds or individuals/lines of them foraging, and "normal" ants are common sights again. Anyone else noticed a decline? Is it possible that some population-controlling factors have come into play?
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Old 11-30-2016, 09:01 AM
CurtC CurtC is offline
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Here in Texas, we got them in the late 70s - I recall getting stung by one the first time when I was a teenager.

I have wondered if there are fewer mounds than there used to be, or whether it's just me getting numb to seeing them. When I lived on a typical suburban lot in Plano, I got them all the time, but now I live on a lot that's completely covered by big trees, and I don't recall seeing a single mound in my yard in the 15 years I've been here. I suspect they like open areas bettter. Because they're not such of an issue for me anymore, maybe I just don't notice them as much.

Last edited by CurtC; 11-30-2016 at 09:01 AM.
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Old 11-30-2016, 09:07 AM
Crotalus Crotalus is offline
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Here's a story from 2012 about it.
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Old 12-01-2016, 01:37 PM
bump bump is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CurtC View Post
Here in Texas, we got them in the late 70s - I recall getting stung by one the first time when I was a teenager.

I have wondered if there are fewer mounds than there used to be, or whether it's just me getting numb to seeing them. When I lived on a typical suburban lot in Plano, I got them all the time, but now I live on a lot that's completely covered by big trees, and I don't recall seeing a single mound in my yard in the 15 years I've been here. I suspect they like open areas bettter. Because they're not such of an issue for me anymore, maybe I just don't notice them as much.
Depends on where in Texas; they were in SE Texas as early as the 1950s, and they were imported into the US through Mobile, AL in the 1930s.

I don't see them as frequently in N. Texas as I did in SE Texas (Houston/Galveston area). Perhaps there's some sort of climate-related factor that makes a difference, and drier/colder areas see less infestation?

Anecdotally, it does seem rather weird that I can't remember finding but maybe one or two fire ant mounds in my backyard over the nearly 10 years since I've lived in our house. Growing up, there was always a sort of continual anti-fire ant patrol- kids would find them, report them to the parents, who'd usually treat the yard with Amdro and dump a big pot of boiling water on the mound. Problem solved... for a while until more ants migrated into the yard.

Last edited by bump; 12-01-2016 at 01:42 PM.
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Old 11-30-2016, 09:17 AM
DSYoungEsq DSYoungEsq is offline
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After looking through several sites, it does not appear that anyone is reporting any decline in the incidence of the red imported fire ant in America.
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Old 11-30-2016, 09:30 AM
Vicsage Vicsage is offline
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Much fewer fire ants in South Florida where I've lived for 50 years. Less mosquitoes too. Less honeybees. Less flees, less ticks. Maybe its just that so much more land is paved and urbanized, but come to think of it, I'm not even seeing dragonflies over my pool anymore. They were common a few years ago. And the wasp nests I battled for years around my house also seem gone.
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Old 11-30-2016, 09:32 AM
Darren Garrison Darren Garrison is offline
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Oh, that reminds me of a photo I took in the early 2000s--sitting on my front porch, I noticed a black ant (of unknown native species) doing something pretty active, and I when I got close I saw that it was busily decapitating fire ants--not eating them, just killing every one in reach. (Not that I'm implying "ant wars" to be a cause for their perceived decline, just a pretty cool photo.)
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Old 12-01-2016, 07:25 AM
ftg ftg is offline
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Sounds like the OP is mixing up some characteristics of fire ants with crazy ants. The latter likes to invade homes and snuggle in electronics. Never heard of fire ants doing that.

The article Crotalus links to mentions something interesting: former multi-queen colonies are now single queen. The latter is the norm for most species. But when a new type of ant invades an area, the resulting colonies have negligible genetic variation which means that the offspring of different queens don't recognize each other as non-siblings and therefore don't go to war but just mix in with them.

An extreme example of this are Argentine ants which have formed basically one giant single colony in S. California.

Perhaps some mutations have occurred and now different colonies can spot the difference. This results in greater spacing between colonies and hence fewer mounds/acre. But once that happens, the population will again stabilize.

So, maybe the solution to invasive stuff like the Argentine ants is to bring in more ants from the native range to introduce genetic variation.
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Old 12-01-2016, 08:35 AM
Ionizer Ionizer is offline
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Originally Posted by ftg View Post
Sounds like the OP is mixing up some characteristics of fire ants with crazy ants. The latter likes to invade homes and snuggle in electronics. Never heard of fire ants doing that.
Fire ants DO like getting into 'electrical areas' of where there is cabling, etc. It was one reason the proposed Texas Supercollider was abandoned (per my friend's Dad, a geologist on the project) and a link to an article about it.

I grew up just north of Houston, and can remember fire ants getting into AC units and other outdoor electrical sites. They love those places, IME, though that was 35-40+ yrs ago. Just saying....

No idea on population increase/decrease, however
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Old 12-01-2016, 09:57 AM
carnivorousplant carnivorousplant is offline
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An article says that crazy ants are displacing fire ants, and that droughts and hard freezes kill fire ants.
Have there been any hard freezes in Miami ?

Last edited by carnivorousplant; 12-01-2016 at 09:58 AM.
  #11  
Old 12-01-2016, 10:43 AM
Leo Bloom Leo Bloom is offline
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Originally Posted by carnivorousplant View Post
An article says that crazy ants are displacing fire ants, and that droughts and hard freezes kill fire ants.
...
So do carnivorous plants, as you know.
  #12  
Old 12-01-2016, 11:02 AM
Jackmannii Jackmannii is offline
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Originally Posted by carnivorousplant View Post
An article says that crazy ants are displacing fire ants, and that droughts and hard freezes kill fire ants.
Have there been any hard freezes in Miami ?
If droughts and hard freezes were fatal to fire ants, there'd be very few of them in Texas. Unfortunately, they withstand both conditions very well.

And yes, fire ants are attracted to things electrical. When I lived in SE Texas, I'd sometimes see them entering the house through AC sockets.
  #13  
Old 12-01-2016, 04:01 PM
voltaire voltaire is offline
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This additional tidbit, from one of the wiki cites, is interesting:
Quote:
Plowes said fire ants are "very aware" of these tiny flies, and it only takes a few to cause the ants to modify their behavior. "Just one or two flies can control movement or above-ground activity," Plowes said. "It's kind of like a medieval activity where you're putting a castle under siege."
https://web.archive.org/web/20090522...latchy/3231765
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Old 12-03-2016, 02:27 PM
pompeybear pompeybear is offline
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They seem as bad as ever here in central Texas (at least as far as I can tell). I have mounds popping up in my yard constantly. We used to have a lot more bugs in general than we do now, which as i understand it, is attributable to the fire ants. I've also heard that the decrease in horny toads (which used to be everywhere) and quail are tied to the fire ants. On the plus side, we used to have ridiculous amounts of chiggers and I don't think I've been bitten in the last 15 years.
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Old 02-26-2017, 01:32 PM
SingleVoyce SingleVoyce is offline
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Fire ants are back

Four years ago, the crazy ants arrived in my yard and drove out the fire ants. For the next couple of years the crazy ants were swarming everywhere. Last year, the population of crazy ants declined dramatically and now they seem to be gone altogether and the fire ants are back. Anybody else experience this?
  #16  
Old 02-26-2017, 02:51 PM
Jackmannii Jackmannii is offline
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Originally Posted by SingleVoyce View Post
Four years ago, the crazy ants arrived in my yard and drove out the fire ants. For the next couple of years the crazy ants were swarming everywhere. Last year, the population of crazy ants declined dramatically and now they seem to be gone altogether and the fire ants are back. Anybody else experience this?
Stories like this are while I'm nostalgic for the Texas ecosystem.*

Not coincidentally perhaps, one of the sponsored ads I'm seeing at the bottom of the page is for a t-shirt with the logo "Whiskey Bent & Hellbound".

*even if you're from somewhere else, this totally sounds like Texas.
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Old 02-26-2017, 03:10 PM
SingleVoyce SingleVoyce is offline
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Originally Posted by Jackmannii View Post
Stories like this are while I'm nostalgic for the Texas ecosystem.*

Not coincidentally perhaps, one of the sponsored ads I'm seeing at the bottom of the page is for a t-shirt with the logo "Whiskey Bent & Hellbound".

*even if you're from somewhere else, this totally sounds like Texas.

I should have mentioned my location in my original post. I am from Texas. I live in North Galveston county near the bay.
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