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Old 12-23-2016, 01:54 PM
Qin Shi Huangdi Qin Shi Huangdi is offline
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Dishes That Have Gone Out of Style?

By this I don't mean particular brand-name foods which are no longer available due to being discontinued or the company itself going out of business but rather particular dishes that used to popular but are no longer that common due to changing tastes. For example in older books I constantly read about references to liver-based dishes such as liver and onions or liverwurst being popular especially in diners and other relatively cheap eateries. However, I've almost never seen liver on menus outside of Korean specialty shops that serve sundae or Korean black pudding/blood sausages. Has taste for liver really disappeared as a result of Americans moving further away from their Continental roots where liver dishes often came from?
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Old 12-23-2016, 02:09 PM
Mama Zappa Mama Zappa is offline
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Well, liver is evil and preferred only by those who consider **mushrooms** edible, so there's that .

Anyway: We're at the tail end of the Baby Boomer generation and liver is definitely not something anyone my age or younger seems to voluntarily eat - I've certainly never heard of anyone saying "Yumm, fixing liver for dinner!". My mother loved it, as does my mother in law. Part of its loss of populariity may well be that it isn't really all that good for you especially given that its benefits (iron, protein) are readily available in the modern diet in less cholesterol-heavy forms.

One of my husband's proudest childhood memories was of the day his mother served them liver for dinner. He regaled the whole family with detailed descriptions of what he'd learned in school about what the liver *does*. His brother and sister, in a rare moment of solidarity, chimed in with plenty of appropriate EWWWWWWWWWW sounds.

His mother never served liver again. .

Other stuff: hmmm....

Weird Jello concoctions.

Instant pudding: for us growing up, it was actually a treat especially if Mom had bought some Cool-Whip (artifical flavoring and plastic, yummmmmmm).

Anything found at Lileks, for sure! (Jello often features there, as I recall).

Tuna-noodle casserole comes to mind. It's just not something you hear much about anymore, though on those rare occasions I have it, I quite like it - I have a tuna lasagna recipe that is basically TNC in a slightly different form factor.

Last edited by Mama Zappa; 12-23-2016 at 02:10 PM.
  #3  
Old 12-23-2016, 03:08 PM
wolfpup wolfpup is online now
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Originally Posted by Mama Zappa View Post
Well, liver is evil and preferred only by those who consider **mushrooms** edible, so there's that .
It's probably true that liver is rarely served as a meal nowadays, assuming it ever was particularly popular, but duck, goose, and/or chicken liver is still widely used in pat and just ordinary liverwurst, which are great snack foods. So, not entirely evil. Not sure what one does with cattle liver, though -- I sure wouldn't eat it!

I'm sorry to see that you have some kind of inexplicable aversion to mushrooms, one of the best accent foods around. Mushrooms sauteed in garlic butter on spaghetti, mushrooms on pizza, mushrooms marinated and grilled with steak, gently roasted mushrooms with prime rib -- those are culinary delights. Not to mention the wonders that can be worked on soups, stews, and rice with deep-flavored dried mushrooms like porcinis. What's wrong with you -- did you have some childhood trauma involving being chased by a giant mushroom?
  #4  
Old 12-23-2016, 04:25 PM
bobot bobot is offline
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Originally Posted by Mama Zappa View Post
...

Tuna-noodle casserole comes to mind. ...
I was going to ask if anyone still did this one, with the potato chips on top.

Last edited by bobot; 12-23-2016 at 04:25 PM.
  #5  
Old 12-23-2016, 08:04 PM
Aspenglow Aspenglow is offline
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I was going to ask if anyone still did this one, with the potato chips on top.
I just made one last night. Used Saltines and shredded Parmesan cheese instead of potato chips, though.

I'm another who regularly roasts whole chickens, makes an occasional quiche, has made Beef Wellington for special dinners and have done quite a few other things listed. Not as often as I used to, though.
  #6  
Old 12-24-2016, 11:13 AM
Son of a Rich Son of a Rich is offline
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I was going to ask if anyone still did this one, with the potato chips on top.
Love it! One of nature's most perfect foods.
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Old 12-24-2016, 12:15 PM
Athena Athena is offline
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For my fellow tuna casserole lovers, here's a really good fancy version of the dish. I've made it several times.

I still make the mushroom-soup version, but it's kinda fun to dress it up sometimes.
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Old 12-24-2016, 12:36 PM
jnglmassiv jnglmassiv is offline
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A generation-older coworker mentioned that she enjoyed chop suey from a local Chinese takeout place. It occurred to me that I couldn't say for certain what it is. Looking up some recipes, it appears to be just about anything stir fried with a sauce but I'm thinking most places will have one thing in common: bland.

I haven't had mint jelly in at least 30 years.
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Old 12-24-2016, 01:00 PM
John Mace John Mace is offline
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When I was a kid, we'd have Sloppy Joes maybe once a month. Does anyone make that anymore?
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Old 12-24-2016, 09:12 PM
Hey Hey Paula Hey Hey Paula is offline
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I was going to ask if anyone still did this one, with the potato chips on top.
Yes, but with French's French Fried Onions on top rather than crushed potato chips. I don't make it very often anymore due to the fact that I usually end up throwing half of it out. I need to cut my recipe down by about a third, my recipe just makes too much for me and the husband.
  #11  
Old 12-24-2016, 09:19 PM
Xema Xema is offline
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Lobscouse.

Spotted dog.

Drowned baby.

Soused hog's face.

Roly-poly pudding.

Last edited by Xema; 12-24-2016 at 09:20 PM.
  #12  
Old 01-04-2017, 03:15 PM
krondys krondys is offline
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I was going to ask if anyone still did this one, with the potato chips on top.
At least once a month, or the kids will kill me for skipping it.
  #13  
Old 12-23-2016, 02:10 PM
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I've seen a lot of old cookbooks from the early-to-mid-20th century and they all seem to have a rather curious obsession with aspic, gelatin, and all other sorts of gelatinized dishes, often in what I would consider quite odd pairings. I was born in the late 70s and I've not seen anything like any of that, well, ever.
  #14  
Old 12-24-2016, 06:00 PM
Pantastic Pantastic is offline
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I definitely remember shrimp cocktails as being a 'you're at a nice restaurant' signal. I can't think of too many that I grew up with in the 80s that you don't see any more - they may not present as high-end, but they're still eaten.

One 'not a dish' that I remember is that ordinary American Chinese food was considered an exotic thing when I was growing up, it was something we were encouraged to go try as an experience, and a history class of mine did a field trip to eat at a Chinese restaurant one time. Now pretty much everyone considers Chinese take-out something about as common as McDonalds.

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I've seen a lot of old cookbooks from the early-to-mid-20th century and they all seem to have a rather curious obsession with aspic, gelatin, and all other sorts of gelatinized dishes, often in what I would consider quite odd pairings. I was born in the late 70s and I've not seen anything like any of that, well, ever.
I think it's because gelatin was an exotic thing that you'd only see at high-end special occasions, then with home refrigeration and mass production it became something anyone could do. There was a combination of showing off by making an exotic food with the idea that if it's from a high-end place, it must be really good. And then once you start having a lot of people making gelatin dishes, it just kind of takes on a life of its own until people come to their senses.

I was born in the 1970s and missed the craze, but growing up there were still a lot of 'fruit cocktail floating in jello' dishes around that you basically don't see today.
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Old 12-24-2016, 08:06 PM
Broomstick Broomstick is offline
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I think it's because gelatin was an exotic thing that you'd only see at high-end special occasions, then with home refrigeration and mass production it became something anyone could do. There was a combination of showing off by making an exotic food with the idea that if it's from a high-end place, it must be really good. And then once you start having a lot of people making gelatin dishes, it just kind of takes on a life of its own until people come to their senses.
Before the advent of powdered gelatin mixes making aspic, especially one refined enough to sustain fruit and other delicate flavors rather than whatever critter it was made from, was a long, labor-intensive process only professional and upper-class kitchens with professional cooks had access to. Then you get commercially made, highly refined gelatin mixes - and suddenly even the poor could eat like the rich!

Can't help but think that was a factor.
  #16  
Old 12-24-2016, 09:27 PM
Guinastasia Guinastasia is online now
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I've always wanted to try and make city chicken with actual chicken, just for kicks.
  #17  
Old 12-25-2016, 02:27 AM
salinqmind salinqmind is offline
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Originally Posted by Broomstick View Post
Before the advent of powdered gelatin mixes making aspic, especially one refined enough to sustain fruit and other delicate flavors rather than whatever critter it was made from, was a long, labor-intensive process only professional and upper-class kitchens with professional cooks had access to. Then you get commercially made, highly refined gelatin mixes - and suddenly even the poor could eat like the rich!

Can't help but think that was a factor.
One of my favorite movies ever is 'Dinner At Eight' (1933) and 'cook' labors to make a molded aspic of a British Lion for visiting uppercrust Englishmen. Aspics have long been a feature of classic French cuisine, using truffles and such for decoration. They're the kind of thing that would be served when the Prince of Wales was visiting, say, Downton Abbey.
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Old 12-25-2016, 03:34 AM
sitchensis sitchensis is offline
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Originally Posted by Broomstick View Post
Before the advent of powdered gelatin mixes making aspic, especially one refined enough to sustain fruit and other delicate flavors rather than whatever critter it was made from, was a long, labor-intensive process only professional and upper-class kitchens with professional cooks had access to. Then you get commercially made, highly refined gelatin mixes - and suddenly even the poor could eat like the rich!

Can't help but think that was a factor.
I'm going to call bull on this. Anyone who has ever cooked with bones knows about gelatin. Gelatin has been used as a meat preservative for a long time. Fancy "French" aspic was a fad, but meat held in gelatin was always a thing, and it didn't need powdered gelatin.

Last edited by sitchensis; 12-25-2016 at 03:35 AM.
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Old 12-25-2016, 05:24 AM
Broomstick Broomstick is offline
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I'm going to call bull on this. Anyone who has ever cooked with bones knows about gelatin. Gelatin has been used as a meat preservative for a long time. Fancy "French" aspic was a fad, but meat held in gelatin was always a thing, and it didn't need powdered gelatin.
I touched on that.

Sure, making say, chicken flavored aspic is dirt simple. I've done it myself. The problem is making clear, flavorless aspic where you could have non-chicken things floating in it that didn't taste like they were floating in chicken goo. It required further clarifying (I think egg whites were used, possibly other things) and thus an extra step and labor.

Powdered gelatin had all that labor and stuff already in it. Mix with hot water and go. Which is why modern aspic/gel recipes start with unflavored gelatin.

It's the difference between starting instructions for roasted chicken with "Go to the butcher and get a dressed, whole chicken" vs. "chase down chicken, kill, pluck, butcher..."
  #20  
Old 12-28-2016, 11:32 AM
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Before the advent of powdered gelatin mixes making aspic, especially one refined enough to sustain fruit and other delicate flavors rather than whatever critter it was made from, was a long, labor-intensive process only professional and upper-class kitchens with professional cooks had access to. Then you get commercially made, highly refined gelatin mixes - and suddenly even the poor could eat like the rich!

Can't help but think that was a factor.
Add in that the "advances" in food science came in the 50s, when middle class housewives were victims of the cult of domesticity, and you get a lot of "fancy" foods hitting home kitchens - geletain becomes easy. Beef Wellington is time consuming, but these housewives have time - and beef has become affordable to the middle class.

The next set of foods in 1970s meals - chicken ala king - the way I know it (noodles, canned chicken, cream of mushroom soup) come from an era when women worked, divorce was fairly high, and the kitchen became something you didn't have all day to spend it. Men needed to cook something if they were divorced, and chicken ala king or sloppy joes are easy when the kids are over. If you are working full time, tuna casserole whips up easy - no one has time for beef wellington (which is a two day deal, if I remember). The 70s were also a recession, so a meal that was cheap and quick was popular.

Someday we will look back on this era and wonder if people really went out for sushi. Remember the 1990s fascination with fajitas? How about $5 each oysters?

(Shrimp cocktail is still huge if the big party platters of shrimp over the holiday season is any indication. The only difference is we don't tend to have individual appetizer sized serving of it often, and more often serve it on a tray).
  #21  
Old 12-23-2016, 02:13 PM
Inner Stickler Inner Stickler is offline
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Steak Diane
Fondue
Anything in Aspic
Baked Alaska
Cherries Jubilee
Peach Melba
Chicken Divan
Charlotte Russe
...
  #22  
Old 12-23-2016, 02:15 PM
GoodOmens GoodOmens is offline
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Quiche.
  #23  
Old 12-23-2016, 05:23 PM
suranyi suranyi is offline
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Quiche.
We still eat quiche quite often. They sell tons of it at Costco.
  #24  
Old 12-23-2016, 03:03 PM
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Steak Diane
Fondue
Anything in Aspic
Baked Alaska
Cherries Jubilee
Peach Melba
Chicken Divan
Charlotte Russe
...
Fondue made a comeback and is offered in many restaurants now. I have two electric pots and usually make it once a year, just because I love it.
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Old 12-26-2016, 06:13 PM
wanderer2575 wanderer2575 is offline
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Baked Alaska
Cherries Jubilee
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Originally Posted by mistymage
You don't see Waldorf Salads that often anymore.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bayard
In movies and TV at least, shrimp cocktail used to be the signal that you were in a classy joint. I can't remember the last time I saw it on a menu or heard of anyone having it.
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Originally Posted by Aspenglow
Also, Beef Wellington
I routinely see all of the above at least once every time I'm on a cruise ship.
  #26  
Old 12-23-2016, 02:26 PM
Inner Stickler Inner Stickler is offline
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Hams baked with pineapple rings and cherries in the center of each ring
Salisbury Steak
Poke cake
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Old 12-23-2016, 02:42 PM
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Chicken la king

A mainstay of American restaurants through the 1960s, it was all but gone from menus by the 80s. Its swift disappearance was the subject of an essay by Calvin Trillin who theorized that millions of gallons of the entre were being stored in grain silos in the midwest.
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Old 12-23-2016, 06:22 PM
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Hams baked with pineapple rings and cherries in the center of each ring
Salisbury Steak
Poke cake
I love a good poke cake. I'm smiling right now because jello isn't as popular as it used to be, but a poke cake made with strawberry jello, yum!
  #29  
Old 12-23-2016, 11:15 PM
Biggirl Biggirl is offline
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Hams baked with pineapple rings and cherries in the center of each ring
My Thanksgiving ham this year.
  #30  
Old 12-23-2016, 02:27 PM
ThelmaLou ThelmaLou is offline
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Chicken a la King

Maybe we could generalize to "creamed <anything> on toast" is out of fashion.

My mother (not a great cook) used to do creamed hamburger on toast and also something she called "corned beef and English peas" which was also sauce-y and served over toast. The corned beef was from a square can, and I don't know what it was about the (canned) peas that made them English.
  #31  
Old 12-23-2016, 02:43 PM
terentii terentii is offline
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My mother (not a great cook) used to do creamed hamburger on toast and also something she called "corned beef and English peas" which was also sauce-y and served over toast. The corned beef was from a square can, and I don't know what it was about the (canned) peas that made them English.
Were they mushy, like in pea soup?
  #32  
Old 12-23-2016, 03:05 PM
ThelmaLou ThelmaLou is offline
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I vote chicken a la king can't be dated because I had that a lot when I grew up and I refuse to believe the 90s is that old already.

Is it weird that I rather enjoy sauce-y things on toast?
I do, too! Stouffer's used to have frozen Welsh Rarebit (savory cheese sauce) that was yummy by itself over toast, or better, with bacon and a slice of tomato on that toast then cheese sauce poured over. Can't find it anymore.

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Were they mushy, like in pea soup?
No, the peas were whole, which raises the whole mysterious issue of "mushy peas," which I understand, you can actually find in a can.
  #33  
Old 12-23-2016, 07:11 PM
terentii terentii is offline
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No, the peas were whole, which raises the whole mysterious issue of "mushy peas," which I understand, you can actually find in a can.
Mushy peas are a British thing, often served along with bangers and mash (grilled sausages and mashed potatoes). They're just what the name implies, and it's like eating very thick pea soup.

They are indeed sold in cans; in Toronto, I buy mine at the Bulk Barn. There are also do-it-yourself kits with dried peas sold in boxes. (I passed on these after reading the ingredients and seeing all the chemicals involved.)
  #34  
Old 12-24-2016, 09:10 AM
amarone amarone is offline
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Mushy peas are a British thing, often served along with bangers and mash (grilled sausages and mashed potatoes). They're just what the name implies, and it's like eating very thick pea soup.
With fish and chips is the best way.
  #35  
Old 12-24-2016, 10:42 AM
romansperson romansperson is offline
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Fondue made a comeback and is offered in many restaurants now. I have two electric pots and usually make it once a year, just because I love it.
Back in the '80s I used to work for a Catholic high school for girls. They decided to discontinue their home ec classes and sold off all the kitchen equipment. I bought one of the fondue pots (Harvest Gold!) and still have it. I make us some fondue once or a twice a year. There are also a couple restaurants in my area which popped up in the last 5 years or so that specialize in fondue, but are (imo) much too pricey to be worth visiting.

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Originally Posted by ThelmaLou View Post
I do, too! Stouffer's used to have frozen Welsh Rarebit (savory cheese sauce) that was yummy by itself over toast, or better, with bacon and a slice of tomato on that toast then cheese sauce poured over. Can't find it anymore.
I loved this too, and was bummed to not be able to find it any more.

Other stuff I haven't seen on menus for a long time: Lobster Newburg (yet another sauced thing on toast) and Lobster Thermidor (sauced thing not on toast!).

I have the recent reissue of Vincent Price's cookbook, which features recipes from famous restaurants of his time. There's all kinds of recipes in there for things you'd almost never see in a restaurant now (fried cucumbers, fruit soup, ring mold salads with vegetables in them, etc.)
  #36  
Old 01-03-2017, 06:46 PM
romansperson romansperson is offline
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I do, too! Stouffer's used to have frozen Welsh Rarebit (savory cheese sauce) that was yummy by itself over toast, or better, with bacon and a slice of tomato on that toast then cheese sauce poured over. Can't find it anymore.
On New Year's Day, the cooking newsletter I get from the NY Times revealed this!

I made it with Guinness and aged Irish cheddar. It's great.
  #37  
Old 01-03-2017, 09:33 PM
Ukulele Ike Ukulele Ike is offline
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On New Year's Day, the cooking newsletter I get from the NY Times revealed this!

I made it with Guinness and aged Irish cheddar. It's great.
That method ain't traditional but, by golly, it looks DELICIOUS. I'll put it on my list!
  #38  
Old 12-23-2016, 06:30 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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Chicken a la King

Maybe we could generalize to "creamed <anything> on toast" is out of fashion.

My mother (not a great cook) used to do creamed hamburger on toast and also something she called "corned beef and English peas" which was also sauce-y and served over toast. The corned beef was from a square can, and I don't know what it was about the (canned) peas that made them English.
Chicken a la king was the first thing I thought of. Can't remember the last time I had it or saw it on a menu anywhere (though it's probably there under some fancy "rebranded" name. )

I eat aspic regularly, as it's a pretty traditional Polish and Eastern European food (especially this time of year), but I wasn't alive during the apparent aspic craze here in the US in the 50s or whenever. I love the stuff (Polish version is usually made with chicken/pork & veggies suspended in aspic) but all of my non-Eastern-European rooted friends think it's the most disgusting thing ever. It is so difficult for me to imagine it having any sort of popularity here, although I wouldn't discount it making a comeback now that I've seen things like offal make a comeback at mid-to-high end restaurants.
  #39  
Old 12-24-2016, 12:31 PM
longhair75 longhair75 is offline
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Originally Posted by ThelmaLou View Post
Chicken a la King

Maybe we could generalize to "creamed <anything> on toast" is out of fashion.

My mother (not a great cook) used to do creamed hamburger on toast and also something she called "corned beef and English peas" which was also sauce-y and served over toast. The corned beef was from a square can, and I don't know what it was about the (canned) peas that made them English.
I made Chicken Ala King for dinner Thursday night......
  #40  
Old 12-23-2016, 02:28 PM
Inner Stickler Inner Stickler is offline
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I vote chicken a la king can't be dated because I had that a lot when I grew up and I refuse to believe the 90s is that old already.

Is it weird that I rather enjoy sauce-y things on toast?

Last edited by Inner Stickler; 12-23-2016 at 02:29 PM.
  #41  
Old 12-23-2016, 02:29 PM
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My kids range from 15 to 23 and all 3 like liver (no onions because I don't like that smell combo), 2 like tuna noodle casserole and 2 like broiled/boiled or fried chicken innards (heart, gizzards, livers).

You don't see Waldorf Salads that often anymore.
  #42  
Old 12-23-2016, 02:39 PM
John Mace John Mace is offline
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Monte Cristo sandwich. They were everywhere in the 80s.
  #43  
Old 12-23-2016, 02:52 PM
Guy N. Forest Guy N. Forest is offline
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Some things in 1950's Oklahoma which should never have been served:
  • Brains and eggs
  • Blood pudding
  • Pickled pig's feet

I liked chicken a la king, but hated the occasional little bone or two hidden in the sauce.
  #44  
Old 12-24-2016, 07:26 PM
DrDeth DrDeth is offline
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Monte Cristo sandwich. They were everywhere in the 80s.
Still at two places in Disneyland. Tasty, but too much for me, now.

My entry is Jello Salads. I mean, real lettuce type salads in Jello. However, the fruit salad in jello is also going away.
  #45  
Old 12-23-2016, 02:42 PM
terentii terentii is offline
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You don't see Waldorf Salads that often anymore.
Can I have a Ritz Salad instead?
  #46  
Old 12-23-2016, 02:48 PM
Intergalactic Gladiator Intergalactic Gladiator is offline
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Can I have a Ritz Salad instead?
You have to watch out if you have a Watergate salad, it might have a bug in it.
  #47  
Old 12-23-2016, 02:51 PM
terentii terentii is offline
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Posts: 14,179
Quote:
Originally Posted by Intergalactic Gladiator View Post
You have to watch out if you have a Watergate salad, it might have a bug in it.
OMG, I'm actually old enough to get this joke!
  #48  
Old 12-23-2016, 08:07 PM
JohnGalt JohnGalt is offline
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Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Med city USA
Posts: 1,839
Quote:
Originally Posted by Intergalactic Gladiator View Post
You have to watch out if you have a Watergate salad, it might have a bug in it.
I made a Watergate salad, ironically of course, for last year's Christmas potluck at work. Nobody touched it; this high-falutin group raves over couscous and such instead. But I liked it!

Are we counting breakfast items? Oatmeal has had a resurgence, but it seems like Cream of Wheat (farina) and its cousin Cocoa Wheat aren't advertised much anymore, and no one admits to eating the stuff.
  #49  
Old 12-23-2016, 08:24 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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Join Date: May 2000
Location: SW Side, Chicago
Posts: 41,179
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnGalt View Post
I made a Watergate salad, ironically of course, for last year's Christmas potluck at work. Nobody touched it; this high-falutin group raves over couscous and such instead. But I liked it!

Are we counting breakfast items? Oatmeal has had a resurgence, but it seems like Cream of Wheat (farina) and its cousin Cocoa Wheat aren't advertised much anymore, and no one admits to eating the stuff.
I had to look that up. I never even heard of Coco Wheat! It looks like it's still around.
  #50  
Old 12-23-2016, 03:02 PM
mistymage mistymage is offline
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Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 620
Quote:
Originally Posted by terentii View Post
Can I have a Ritz Salad instead?
Eww...too many carbs!! Although I did once enjoy a mock apple pie made with Ritz. I guess there are a few recipes for Ritz Salad: http://www.cooks.com/rec/search/0,1-..._salad,FF.html
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