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Old 02-18-2017, 11:12 AM
racer72 racer72 is online now
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Foods that should taste good but don't.

A friend of my wife hosted an in home sales party, something like Tupperware. Only it was for a brand of chocolates. One of the items my wife brought home was a jar of Cocoa Roma pasta sauce. It wasn't sampled at the party but she though it sounded good. She prepared it last night for dinner. Basically just warmed up with some browned ground turkey and some spaghetti. In hindsight it might have been a good idea. It tasted terrible. We ended up at a local IHOP for dinner. She also bought a bottle of some BBQ sauce too. Not sure how that stuff tastes, not sure I want to know.

Anything else sound good but tasted terrible?
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Old 02-18-2017, 11:26 AM
Asimovian Asimovian is offline
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Old 02-18-2017, 11:38 AM
Evan Drake Evan Drake is offline
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Quinoa is sinfully delicious. Budgie-seed for the discerning gourmet.
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Old 02-18-2017, 11:39 AM
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My gf attended a high-end salt tasting party. Salt. Seriously. Pink salt. Salt with tiny bits of "truffles".

She bought a few tiny jars of expensive salt, mostly out of a feeling of obligation. They were salty.
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Old 02-18-2017, 06:19 PM
Fenris Fenris is offline
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My gf attended a high-end salt tasting party. Salt. Seriously. Pink salt. Salt with tiny bits of "truffles".

She bought a few tiny jars of expensive salt, mostly out of a feeling of obligation. They were salty.
Truffle salt is actually pretty good, if you get truffle salt that's got 100% real truffle and no fake flavors. (and about 5% actual real truffle)

The problem is that most of the time, it's some microscopic amount of real truffle and a ton of "truffle flavoring" which tastes like farts.
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Old 02-18-2017, 11:43 AM
Chefguy Chefguy is offline
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Originally Posted by racer72 View Post
A friend of my wife hosted an in home sales party, something like Tupperware. Only it was for a brand of chocolates. One of the items my wife brought home was a jar of Cocoa Roma pasta sauce. It wasn't sampled at the party but she though it sounded good. She prepared it last night for dinner. Basically just warmed up with some browned ground turkey and some spaghetti. In hindsight it might have been a good idea. It tasted terrible. We ended up at a local IHOP for dinner. She also bought a bottle of some BBQ sauce too. Not sure how that stuff tastes, not sure I want to know.

Anything else sound good but tasted terrible?
Just want to say that the words 'cocoa' and 'pasta sauce' just do NOT go together. It sounds revolting.

And salt tasting is just another bullshit scam. Salt is salt. I really hate those parties where you feel obligated to buy something. My ex used to drag me to those damn things and we ended up with a lot of Tupperware and some really tacky home decorator stuff.

Last edited by Chefguy; 02-18-2017 at 11:44 AM.
  #7  
Old 02-18-2017, 03:54 PM
JKilez JKilez is online now
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Just want to say that the words 'cocoa' and 'pasta sauce' just do NOT go together. It sounds revolting.
Add some cayenne and chipotle and you have a mole. Delicious.
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Old 02-18-2017, 04:25 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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Add some cayenne and chipotle and you have a mole. Delicious.
Or add some cinnamon/clove and a bit of ground beef, and you basically got Cincinnati chili, which really is closer to a pasta sauce than a chili.
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Old 02-18-2017, 04:35 PM
RivkahChaya RivkahChaya is offline
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Strawberry ice cream. It's never as good as you think it's going to be. I have had generic kinds; gourmet kinds; kinds that supposedly had chunks of strawberries in them; off-white, dye-free, artificial flavor-free kinds; kinds that were chock-full of chemicals; and not one ever succeeded in tasting remotely like a strawberry. Or like much of anything. They were all just kind of vaguely sweet.
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Old 02-18-2017, 05:49 PM
NDP NDP is offline
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Strawberry ice cream. It's never as good as you think it's going to be. I have had generic kinds; gourmet kinds; kinds that supposedly had chunks of strawberries in them; off-white, dye-free, artificial flavor-free kinds; kinds that were chock-full of chemicals; and not one ever succeeded in tasting remotely like a strawberry. Or like much of anything. They were all just kind of vaguely sweet.
If I may go one step further, I'd say strawberries themselves. I've eaten them many times but they're almost always disappointing. They're a little tangy, a little sweet, but mostly bland. I usually end up having to add sugar or some other sweetner to them. I don't have that problem wiith other types of ripe berries and fruits.
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  #11  
Old 02-23-2017, 10:12 PM
mattm mattm is offline
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Mmmm, Strawberries

If you can get this in your locale, you will be pleasantly surprised.
If you are a strawberry junkie like me, you'll really appreciate it. It Does have Real Strawberries in it. Real Strawberries, not those giant, red on the outside, pale pink on the inside, tasteless blobs you find in the produce section of your local supermarket.

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Originally Posted by RivkahChaya View Post
Strawberry ice cream. It's never as good as you think it's going to be. I have had generic kinds; gourmet kinds; kinds that supposedly had chunks of strawberries in them; off-white, dye-free, artificial flavor-free kinds; kinds that were chock-full of chemicals; and not one ever succeeded in tasting remotely like a strawberry. Or like much of anything. They were all just kind of vaguely sweet.
  #12  
Old 02-18-2017, 07:07 PM
Jennshark Jennshark is offline
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Add some cayenne and chipotle and you have a mole. Delicious.
You beat me to it -- this concotion sounds a lot like an ersatz mole.

I've tried to like hot dogs all of my life. The sight and smell of 'dogs on a NYC vendor's cart will make my mouth water and so I'll try one every few years just to check if I suddenly like them. Nope. Same-o, same-o rubbery, hot bologna yick made of pig snouts and anus (anii?)
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Old 02-18-2017, 08:25 PM
terentii terentii is offline
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I've tried to like hot dogs all of my life. The sight and smell of 'dogs on a NYC vendor's cart will make my mouth water and so I'll try one every few years just to check if I suddenly like them. Nope. Same-o, same-o rubbery, hot bologna yick made of pig snouts and anus (anii?)
All-beef franks are infinitely better. And kosher all-beef are the best of the best. Right now, I'd do just about anything for a Chicago-style kosher hot dog with a few drops of Tabasco. Mmmmmmmmmmmm!
  #14  
Old 02-22-2017, 04:05 PM
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Add some cayenne and chipotle and you have a mole. Delicious.
Foods that should taste good but don't?

Moles. Voles too for that matter.
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Old 02-22-2017, 04:12 PM
eschereal eschereal is offline
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Foods that should taste good but don't?

Moles. Voles too for that matter.
clearly you have never had mole prepared by a shrew
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Old 02-18-2017, 03:00 PM
NeonMadman NeonMadman is offline
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For me, it's coffee. That stuff smells just wonderful when it's brewing, but let any of it get into my mouth, and I'll spew it out in a heartbeat. I can't even stand anything that vaguely tastes like coffee; coffee ice cream, for example.
  #17  
Old 02-22-2017, 08:50 AM
Annie-Xmas Annie-Xmas is offline
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For me, it's coffee. That stuff smells just wonderful when it's brewing, but let any of it get into my mouth, and I'll spew it out in a heartbeat. I can't even stand anything that vaguely tastes like coffee; coffee ice cream, for example.
I love the way coffee looks, particularly with cream added. Such a pretty color.
I love the way coffee is so nice and warm. Wrapping your hands around a cup is heaven.
I love the way coffee makes me feel, so energized.
I love the way coffee smells. Like being alive.

But coffee tastes like shit. Why do you think people add so many different things to it?
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Old 02-18-2017, 04:42 PM
Ukulele Ike Ukulele Ike is offline
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A coffee joint on the next corner sells a cheddar-dill scone. I'd had several of them years ago, then went off them for some reason.

Last weekend I asked for one, split and spread with scallion cream cheese. Sounds good, right?

Nope. Cake-y texture, flavor not at all what I remembered. Maybe I should have asked them to toast it.

(Don't ever do this. If you order a toasted bagel or bialy with cream cheese, you get melted cream cheese oozing out over EVERYTHING and very little adhering to the interior of the pastry.)
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Old 02-18-2017, 04:52 PM
Bosda Di'Chi of Tricor Bosda Di'Chi of Tricor is offline
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Vanilla Extract is not good to drink, as my 4 year old self learned, to my rue & regret.
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Old 02-18-2017, 05:05 PM
Wesley Clark Wesley Clark is offline
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I don't think I've ever tasted a good cheeseburger pizza. Cheeseburgers = great. Pizza = great. Cheeseburger pizza = crap. No idea what went wrong.
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Old 02-18-2017, 05:25 PM
Shagnasty Shagnasty is offline
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Roasted chestnuts. The famous song makes them sound so enticing but don't fall for it because it's a trap! I am not a picky eater in the least and I love nuts but roasted chestnuts are nasty as hell. The vile taste and texture are hard to describe but they are like vaguely spoiled, spongy, mealy, semi-sweet hunks of unidentifiable purification. They could have literally picked almost any other type of nut and it would have work out infinitely better - walnuts, pistachios, pecans etc. Those are all excellent but not so with chestnuts.
  #22  
Old 02-18-2017, 08:10 PM
terentii terentii is offline
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Roasted chestnuts. The famous song makes them sound so enticing but don't fall for it because it's a trap! I am not a picky eater in the least and I love nuts but roasted chestnuts are nasty as hell. The vile taste and texture are hard to describe but they are like vaguely spoiled, spongy, mealy, semi-sweet hunks of unidentifiable purification. They could have literally picked almost any other type of nut and it would have work out infinitely better - walnuts, pistachios, pecans etc. Those are all excellent but not so with chestnuts.
Where did you get your chestnuts? Did you gather them yourself? When roasted, they should taste like baked potato, only sweeter. I love them!

I'm assuming you know there's more than one kind? Horse chestnuts are, as you describe, inedible. Back in 1991, when I was living in a town in Czechoslovakia where the streets were littered with the damned things in November, I did not know this. So I collected a bagful and took them home to roast, thinking I'd struck the mother lode. Imagine how I felt when I took a great big bite and immediately spit it out. Yeccch! Revolting!

A couple of years ago, I bought another bag full of chestnuts at a supermarket here in Toronto. These were the edible kind, but when I got them home and started peeling them, I found the whole lot was moldy. Again, yeccch!

With regard to my own personal dislikes, number one on my list is that horrid French Roast coffee restaurants were pushing back in the '90s. Tastes like moldy vanilla, if you ask me. Again, yeccch! How anyone can drink that crap is beyond me!
  #23  
Old 02-18-2017, 08:19 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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Where did you get your chestnuts? Did you gather them yourself? When roasted, they should taste like baked potato, only sweeter. I love them!
Actually, I'll side with Shagnasty on this. Roasted chestnuts smell like they should be the greatest thing in the world but they end up tasting like, as you described it, slightly sweeter (and vaguely nutty) baked potatoes. Not my thing at all. I've eaten them at the Christmas markets in Europe (mostly Budapest) where they are ubiquitous, so it's not the quality of chestnuts that's the problem. They're just bland. I'm not sure I've ever gotten ones that match Shagnasty's description, but I just didn't get their appeal. Of course, I'm also not a fan of baked potatoes, so maybe that has something to do with it. And every year I would try them again, enticed by the smell, and every year I wonder why I bothered.
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Old 02-18-2017, 08:23 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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With regard to my own personal dislikes, number one on my list is that horrid French Roast coffee restaurants were pushing back in the '90s. Tastes like moldy vanilla, if you ask me. Again, yeccch! How anyone can drink that crap is beyond me!
Are you talking actual French Roast coffee, which is a wide range of coffees that is roasted to a particular level that is darker than your standard roast, or are you talking about the French vanilla flavored coffee which, I agree, was terrible and sounds like it matches your description more than French roast coffee.
  #25  
Old 02-19-2017, 08:07 AM
kayaker kayaker is online now
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Originally Posted by Shagnasty View Post
Roasted chestnuts. The famous song makes them sound so enticing but don't fall for it because it's a trap! I am not a picky eater in the least and I love nuts but roasted chestnuts are nasty as hell. The vile taste and texture are hard to describe but they are like vaguely spoiled, spongy, mealy, semi-sweet hunks of unidentifiable purification. They could have literally picked almost any other type of nut and it would have work out infinitely better - walnuts, pistachios, pecans etc. Those are all excellent but not so with chestnuts.
The best use I've found for roasted chestnuts is a cream soup using them along with wild rice. We serve it once a year around xmas, and people are always amazed.

It's a difficult soup to make (scoring, roasting, peeling the chestnuts) but worth the effort.
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Old 02-19-2017, 08:24 AM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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The best use I've found for roasted chestnuts is a cream soup using them along with wild rice. We serve it once a year around xmas, and people are always amazed.

It's a difficult soup to make (scoring, roasting, peeling the chestnuts) but worth the effort.
Ooo.. that actually sounds really tasty. I'll have to remember that next winter when the chestnuts show up at the grocery and give it a try,
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Old 02-19-2017, 08:34 AM
RivkahChaya RivkahChaya is offline
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The Kosher dogs my dad used to buy in the American Midwest (primarily from Chicago) came from a different universe than the all-beef franks I get here in Toronto. (I suppose I could try a Halal butcher and see if I can find anything like them. I have yet to see Kosher meat offered anywhere near where I live.)
Canada doesn't have Hebrew National?


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I lived in Russia full-time from 1992 to 2008. I can recall only one instance where I was offered caviar in someone's kitchen, and that was because (a) the couple was rich (we're talking BUCKETS of fresh black caviar) and (b) I was giving the wife English lessons. Nowadays, the average Russian can barely afford a tin of the stuff to enjoy at New Year's, and supermarkets keep their selection under lock and key. I go back to Russia at least twice a year, and have noticed that ersatz caviar made from kelp is now on sale in a lot of stores. (Not bad stuff, either.)
Like I said, I lived in the Soviet Union. It was a different place.
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Neither do I, though my local supermarket (in Moscow) always has a bewildering variety of bread on sale.
I remember the food generally being terrible in Russia (I once was served a bowl of chicken soup with a feather in it), but the bread was amazing.

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You're not the first one I've heard who's made this complaint about blueberries but I've noticed it seems only to apply to blueberries in the Northeast US. Not to brag but the blueberries grown in the Pacific Northwest taste pretty sweet even when eaten raw. Must be a different variety.
In S. Indiana, we had neighbors who had blueberry bushes in their backyard. They had a high yield, and the neighbors used to invite people to come and pick blueberries, because they had more than enough for themselves. They were delicious. It's probably just another garden vs. store thing. In New England, they are very proud of their blueberries, so they cultivate them, and they are better there-- there are several varieties. My mother lives in Maine, and overnights me fresh blueberries a couple of times a year, in addition to sending blueberry jams and other things. They are fantastic. But year, fresh blueberries from the store in Indiana are like eating slightly sweet packing peanuts. When I bake blueberry muffins, I use frozen. There is a brand that is way better than the fresh ones. My mother also sends me dried Maine blueberries for my Hamantashen.

Last edited by RivkahChaya; 02-19-2017 at 08:35 AM.
  #28  
Old 02-19-2017, 09:53 AM
terentii terentii is offline
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The best use I've found for roasted chestnuts is a cream soup using them along with wild rice. We serve it once a year around xmas, and people are always amazed.

It's a difficult soup to make (scoring, roasting, peeling the chestnuts) but worth the effort.
I have a tin of chestnut puree (made in France, I think). Can I use that instead of chestnuts out of the bag?
  #29  
Old 02-18-2017, 08:28 PM
Derleth Derleth is offline
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I don't think I've ever tasted a good cheeseburger pizza. Cheeseburgers = great. Pizza = great. Cheeseburger pizza = crap. No idea what went wrong.
Wow. One of my favorite pizzas ever was the bacon cheeseburger pizza at Pizza Inn, Poplar Bluff, Missouri, back when I lived there in the 1990s. Of course, it had mustard instead of tomato sauce, cheddar cheese mixed in with the parmesan, dill pickle slices, and, as I mentioned, bacon chunks as well as the hamburger. Maybe a half-assed version of that wouldn't taste very good.

For me, it's caviar. The first time I had it, back when my dad was in the Air Force Reserve and my family occasionally ate with him at the officer's club on base, it was just amazingly salty. Salt overload. I always figured "that couldn't have been good caviar, nobody would spread salt paste on crackers and call it high-class" so, when I saw some at Albertsons, I bought a tiny little jar. Well... I was right about the saltiness, but I still don't like it, because it's too fishy. Oh, well. Maybe when I'm richer and stupider I'll buy some of the truly high-class stuff and give it one last whirl.
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Old 02-18-2017, 08:39 PM
Shagnasty Shagnasty is offline
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For me, it's caviar. The first time I had it, back when my dad was in the Air Force Reserve and my family occasionally ate with him at the officer's club on base, it was just amazingly salty. Salt overload. I always figured "that couldn't have been good caviar, nobody would spread salt paste on crackers and call it high-class" so, when I saw some at Albertsons, I bought a tiny little jar. Well... I was right about the saltiness, but I still don't like it, because it's too fishy. Oh, well. Maybe when I'm richer and stupider I'll buy some of the truly high-class stuff and give it one last whirl.
Caviar is only considered "high-class" because it is hard to produce so therefore expensive. I like it just fine in moderation but I am not going to pay for it myself.

There are a number of exclusive foods like that. Fugu (poisonous pufferfish) is really bland. Foie gras (fattened goose liver) is sometimes tolerable but usually tastes like licking a newborn baby's diaper.

My ex-wife is one of the most foremost cheese experts in the world responsible for importing the most exotic ones to the U.S. and there are even some that she thinks are disgusting regardless of their history and backstory. I have taste tested some exotic cheeses that made me actively furious. You won't see those in the U.S. because they didn't make it but someone is making and eating them somewhere.

Just because something exists and expensive, doesn't mean that it is good.
  #31  
Old 02-18-2017, 08:52 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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Foie gras (fattened goose liver) is sometimes tolerable but usually tastes like licking a newborn baby's diaper.
Oh, man, I dunno. A nice goose foie gras is one of my gustatory pleasures. I don't have it very often, but, along with the chestnuts I mentioned before, the Hungarians were big on their goose liver (France and Hungary are the two largest foie gras producers in the world), and that's one delight I did develop a taste for. Just sublime.
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Old 02-18-2017, 09:29 PM
Derleth Derleth is offline
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Caviar is only considered "high-class" because it is hard to produce so therefore expensive. I like it just fine in moderation but I am not going to pay for it myself.
Well, you probably like it a bit more than I do, but the existence of cheap caviar indicates people who don't treat it as a Giffen good.

Quote:
There are a number of exclusive foods like that. Fugu (poisonous pufferfish) is really bland. Foie gras (fattened goose liver) is sometimes tolerable but usually tastes like licking a newborn baby's diaper.
I'll never eat fugu, but I love foie gras, which I've eaten often enough to say that confidently.

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My ex-wife is one of the most foremost cheese experts in the world responsible for importing the most exotic ones to the U.S. and there are even some that she thinks are disgusting regardless of their history and backstory. I have taste tested some exotic cheeses that made me actively furious. You won't see those in the U.S. because they didn't make it but someone is making and eating them somewhere.
I've never been enraged by cheese (band name!) but I do enjoy the stinky cheeses I've had and the cheeses with rinds and the extremely hard cheeses and... well, I've had my share of the cheese board, and I've never had one I've considered actively bad, as opposed to merely not as good as others.

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Just because something exists and expensive, doesn't mean that it is good.
The software world proves this many, many times over.
  #33  
Old 02-18-2017, 11:57 PM
John Mace John Mace is offline
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Caviar is only considered "high-class" because it is hard to produce so therefore expensive. I like it just fine in moderation but I am not going to pay for it myself.

There are a number of exclusive foods like that. Fugu (poisonous pufferfish) is really bland.
I had fugu exactly once, at a restaurant in Japan. It was some of the best sashimi I've ever tasted. Subtle, yes. Bland, no.

Japanese food is not like American food. Americans go for BIG FLAVORS. Thick sauces that sometimes drown out the food they are on. Japanese food is pure and delicate.

Last edited by John Mace; 02-18-2017 at 11:59 PM.
  #34  
Old 02-21-2017, 12:41 PM
FoieGrasIsEvil FoieGrasIsEvil is offline
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Originally Posted by Shagnasty View Post
Foie gras (fattened goose liver) is sometimes tolerable but usually tastes like licking a newborn baby's diaper.


You're not getting good/properly prepared foie gras then. Seasoned and seared with a bit of an acidic fruit compote or some such with some toast points, or a nice torchon with dried apricots served on brioche...it's EVILLY good.
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Old 02-18-2017, 08:42 PM
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I still don't like it, because it's too fishy. Oh, well. Maybe when I'm richer and stupider I'll buy some of the truly high-class stuff and give it one last whirl.
Try it on bliny with sour cream. Delicious!
  #36  
Old 02-22-2017, 07:41 AM
DesertDog DesertDog is offline
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Vanilla Extract is not good to drink, as my 4 year old self learned, to my rue & regret.
When I was four I climbed up into the cupboard and found mom's stash of Hershey's baking chocolate. I couldn't read but I knew what a flat package with silver letters on brown meant.

Not good.
  #37  
Old 02-18-2017, 05:52 PM
Weisshund Weisshund is offline
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Avacado

I know many like them, and i have tried to eat them, but to me it's like someone farted in a pile of green mush, then tried to feed it to you.

Shame because they look great and all
  #38  
Old 02-18-2017, 07:01 PM
psychobunny psychobunny is offline
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I once bought some gorgonzola dolce because it sounded interesting. If I had bothered to actually think about it I would have realized that the combination of sweet and blue cheese would taste exactly how it sounds. I am somebody who will try almost anything once and I love almost all cheeses but this was just wrong (although there must be people who like it or they wouldn't sell it).
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Old 02-18-2017, 07:12 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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Originally Posted by psychobunny View Post
I once bought some gorgonzola dolce because it sounded interesting. If I had bothered to actually think about it I would have realized that the combination of sweet and blue cheese would taste exactly how it sounds. I am somebody who will try almost anything once and I love almost all cheeses but this was just wrong (although there must be people who like it or they wouldn't sell it).
Sweet & blue cheese is actually a classic pairing -- whether fruit, honey, or a sweet wine. (Though I've never had gorgonzola dolce. It looks to me like it's just a young, soft, mild gorgonzola rather than anything actually sweet.)
  #40  
Old 02-18-2017, 07:23 PM
Amateur Barbarian Amateur Barbarian is offline
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Blueberries. Never had one that didn't taste a little bland and chalky. I think they're only good when cooked into jam or pie filling, and even then I find it underwhelming compared to other fruits.

Lobster. Meh. Gimme crab any time.

Of course, I now live in the middle of Blueberry/Lobster land and there's nary a boysenberry to be seen, nor crab at any reasonable price.
  #41  
Old 02-19-2017, 02:49 AM
NDP NDP is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Amateur Barbarian View Post
Blueberries. Never had one that didn't taste a little bland and chalky. I think they're only good when cooked into jam or pie filling, and even then I find it underwhelming compared to other fruits.
You're not the first one I've heard who's made this complaint about blueberries but I've noticed it seems only to apply to blueberries in the Northeast US. Not to brag but the blueberries grown in the Pacific Northwest taste pretty sweet even when eaten raw. Must be a different variety.
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Old 02-19-2017, 10:48 AM
Patx2 Patx2 is offline
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Originally Posted by NDP View Post
You're not the first one I've heard who's made this complaint about blueberries but I've noticed it seems only to apply to blueberries in the Northeast US. Not to brag but the blueberries grown in the Pacific Northwest taste pretty sweet even when eaten raw. Must be a different variety.
I'd love to try some blueberries from the Pacific Northwest because I agree that I don't see the appeal of them. I know people that love them. I can eat them, but I don't see what's special about them.
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Old 02-19-2017, 02:28 PM
eschereal eschereal is offline
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I'd love to try some blueberries from the Pacific Northwest because I agree that I don't see the appeal of them. I know people that love them. I can eat them, but I don't see what's special about them.
Huckleberries. From the Gifford-Pinchot, picked of the bush on a hot and dusty August afternoon. PNW blueberries a just a ball of wet sugar.
  #44  
Old 02-19-2017, 03:20 PM
kayaker kayaker is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Patx2 View Post
I'd love to try some blueberries from the Pacific Northwest because I agree that I don't see the appeal of them. I know people that love them. I can eat them, but I don't see what's special about them.
I love blueberries because of how easily they freeze. I made blueberry waffles for breakfast yesterday from last year's harvest and couldn't tell them from freshly picked.
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Old 02-19-2017, 09:33 PM
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I love blueberries because of how easily they freeze. I made blueberry waffles for breakfast yesterday from last year's harvest and couldn't tell them from freshly picked.
My daughter loves them frozen. She will just freeze them and eat them.
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Old 02-21-2017, 10:47 AM
TRC4941 TRC4941 is offline
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Red Delicious apples! They look exactly what their name implies - red and delicious BUT they have to be the blandest apples grown.

Last edited by TRC4941; 02-21-2017 at 10:47 AM.
  #47  
Old 02-21-2017, 02:58 PM
snowthx snowthx is offline
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Originally Posted by TRC4941 View Post
Red Delicious apples! They look exactly what their name implies - red and delicious BUT they have to be the blandest apples grown.
Seconded. Altho if you have had one right off the tree you would swear it is not the same apple as the mealy mess they sell at the grocer. That's probably the same for all store-bought apples, tho.
  #48  
Old 02-21-2017, 03:53 PM
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Originally Posted by TRC4941 View Post
Red Delicious apples! They look exactly what their name implies - red and delicious BUT they have to be the blandest apples grown.
Buy only the good ones! The name Red Delicious describes a family of apples. Some are great, many are lousy. Look for firm ones that are not completely red. Maybe even an orange-red streak appearance.

Like with many popular things (e.g., some breeds of dogs), the growers went hog wild planting trees without any concern over quality. Combined with crappy long term storage systems they've nearly ruined the whole category. But there are really good ones out there.

I know I'm going to take heat for this one, but ... I like chocolate. I like raisins. But chocolate covered raisins are the food from Hades. How could these two things taste so awful together? And why do people buy them?????
  #49  
Old 02-22-2017, 01:52 PM
TRC4941 TRC4941 is offline
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Originally Posted by ftg View Post
Buy only the good ones! The name Red Delicious describes a family of apples. Some are great, many are lousy. Look for firm ones that are not completely red. Maybe even an orange-red streak appearance.

Like with many popular things (e.g., some breeds of dogs), the growers went hog wild planting trees without any concern over quality. Combined with crappy long term storage systems they've nearly ruined the whole category. But there are really good ones out there.

I know I'm going to take heat for this one, but ... I like chocolate. I like raisins. But chocolate covered raisins are the food from Hades. How could these two things taste so awful together? And why do people buy them?????
I will agree - the streaked Red Delicious apples are the only ones that are somewhat good. The worst ones are the beautiful deep red ones!!
  #50  
Old 02-18-2017, 08:04 PM
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Pasta. The sauce cooking makes some pretty good smells, but put it on top of a plate full of bland noodly noodles... yuck. Noodles should always be used in moderation. They're not a dish in and of themselves, no matter what sauce you pour on top to pretend they have actual flavor.
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