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  #1  
Old 05-11-2009, 09:10 AM
Quasimodem Quasimodem is offline
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Ask The Guy With Early Onset Alzheimer's (Inspired by DMark)

Don't know if any of you are watching the very powerful documentary series "The Alzheimer's Project", but if you didn't, (and even if you did) and have some questions, I'd like to open this thread with an invitation for y'all to ask me questions.

Please. Do NOT worry about offending me with any question regarding my EOAD, okay? Part of my job as an Alzheimer's Advocate with my local chapter is to educate, so don't be shy./

I'll start it off with an answer to a question you might not ask because of the above reason:

Yes, I do consider myself demented.

So have at it, Kids!

Love

Bill
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Last edited by Quasimodem; 05-11-2009 at 09:12 AM..
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  #2  
Old 05-11-2009, 09:33 AM
Wargamer Wargamer is offline
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OK, I'll start.

Is there any difference between EOAD and regular Alzheimer's?
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  #3  
Old 05-11-2009, 09:58 AM
Mahaloth Mahaloth is offline
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I do read your blog and I think I have a question others will be thinking.

1. Is it terminal? Will you die from this?

2. If so, do you have an estimate on how long you have to live?
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  #4  
Old 05-11-2009, 10:00 AM
MsWhich MsWhich is offline
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What were your first symptoms? What led you to be diagnosed? How old were (are?) you at time of diagnosis? Has there been any else in your family with Alzheimer's or other types of dementia?
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  #5  
Old 05-11-2009, 10:08 AM
Quasimodem Quasimodem is offline
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Thanks for the question, Wargamer.

Yes, there is a difference, but the difference relates to stages.

"Early Onset Alzheimer's" is stage 3 (the one I am in now) and here are the symptoms:

Stage 3: Mild cognitive decline

Early-stage Alzheimer's can be diagnosed in some, but not all, individuals with these symptoms:

Friends, family, or co-workers begin to notice deficiencies. Problems with memory or concentration may be measurable in clinical testing or discernible during a detailed medical interview.

Common difficulties include:

1. Word- or name-finding problems noticeable to family or close associates

2. Decreased ability to remember names when introduced to new people

3. Performance issues in social or work settings noticeable to family, friends, or co-workers

4. Reading a passage and retaining little material

5. Losing or misplacing a valuable object

6. Decline in ability to plan or organize

Wargamer, there are 7 stages in all, and stage 5 is when one enters the "full-blown" Alzheimer's realm.

Here's a very informative website which describes all 7 stages in detail.

http://neurology.health-cares.net/alzheimers-stages.php

In closing, let me add that although I am considered stage 3, I do have one of the symptoms in stage 4 already. I cannot count backward from 100 by 7's.

I hope this answers your question and thanks very much for your interest!

Bill
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  #6  
Old 05-11-2009, 10:14 AM
Quasimodem Quasimodem is offline
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Originally Posted by MsWhatsit View Post
What were your first symptoms? What led you to be diagnosed? How old were (are?) you at time of diagnosis? Has there been any else in your family with Alzheimer's or other types of dementia?
MsWhatsit

1. Forgetfulness: like within 20 minutes of being told a very significant thing. This was the main thing that caused me to ask for a neuro-referral.

2. I am 59 and was diagnosed this year, but I'm afraid I have had these symtoms long before then

3. Both my parents were diagnosed with pre-senile dementia in the early 1990's, so i am a good "candidate" (YAY! Vote for me! ) for AD.

Thanks, Mswhatsit!

Bill
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  #7  
Old 05-11-2009, 10:23 AM
Quasimodem Quasimodem is offline
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Originally Posted by Mahaloth View Post
I do read your blog and I think I have a question others will be thinking.

1. Is it terminal? Will you die from this?

2. If so, do you have an estimate on how long you have to live?[/B]
Hey Mahaloth!

1. Yes and yes.

2. I can live another 8-20 years. And that is what is keeping me so pro-active! Within that time-frame, surely someone will come up with a cure, "Shirley"!

But I'd like to add the following caveat, Mahaloth: These symptoms and the way the meds for the AD are working on me, ain't no party. Ain't no disco, neither! This really ain't "no foolin' around"! Apologies to the Heads!

Thanks for reading the blog and checking in here, Mahaloth.

Du rockst!

Bill
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  #8  
Old 05-11-2009, 10:49 AM
Madd Maxx Madd Maxx is offline
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How long before you forget that I asked this question?
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Old 05-11-2009, 11:06 AM
Alastair Moonsong Alastair Moonsong is offline
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Originally Posted by Quasimodem View Post
Yes, there is a difference, but the difference relates to stages.

"Early Onset Alzheimer's" is stage 3 (the one I am in now) and here are the symptoms:

Stage 3: Mild cognitive decline

Early-stage Alzheimer's can be diagnosed in some, but not all, individuals with these symptoms:

Friends, family, or co-workers begin to notice deficiencies. Problems with memory or concentration may be measurable in clinical testing or discernible during a detailed medical interview.

Common difficulties include:

1. Word- or name-finding problems noticeable to family or close associates

2. Decreased ability to remember names when introduced to new people

3. Performance issues in social or work settings noticeable to family, friends, or co-workers

4. Reading a passage and retaining little material

5. Losing or misplacing a valuable object

6. Decline in ability to plan or organize
Question: What, exactly, differentiates EOAD (as defined by the above symptoms) from the more common affliction known to laypersons as "college"?

More serious questions:
- Are the causes of Alzheimer's disease known? Is it based in genetics, is it a response to a viral or bacterial infection? Is it caused by exposure to certain environmental factors? Or something else?

- Related to the above: Are there any lifestyle tips that if adopted early enough will ward off AD to at least some degree?

- What exactly does an Alzheimer's Advocate, well, advocate? My limited understanding of the disease is that it is incurable, has no known cause (or at least no cause that we can control or eliminate), manifests itself in a variety of symptoms, and is fatal. What can ordinary people, citizens who care but are not cutting-edge medical researchers, actually DO in order to help?
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  #10  
Old 05-11-2009, 11:19 AM
Quasimodem Quasimodem is offline
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Originally Posted by Madd Maxx View Post
How long before you forget that I asked this question?
I'll answer you this way Madd Maxx: Because of the nature of the question, it will probably stay with me for quite a while.

Also, my reading comprehension sucks and I am very likely to buy the same book twice. It has happened, and Border's Books has always taken the second purchase back.

That is to say, as long as the material is in front of my eyes (like here), I'm fine. But if it's anything I have to read and retain, forget about it.

Thanks

Bill
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Old 05-11-2009, 11:32 AM
mnemosyne mnemosyne is offline
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My FIL is a psychiatrist, and he said that there is a pretty standard test of about 30 questions used in the initial analysis of a patient who may have Alheimers or other dementia.

Apparently the only question that matters* is the "time" one; have the patient draw a clock on a blank piece of paper, and set the clock at "ten-past-ten".

Did you have that test/question, and how did you do?

*matters in the sense that many people might not remember whether today is the 10th or the 11th, and being able to count backwards from 100 by 7s is difficult for a lot of normal people, etc. This came about during a rather drunken dinner conversation, so don't take my recollection of the test/conversation as any type of serious reference!
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Old 05-11-2009, 11:52 AM
Quasimodem Quasimodem is offline
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Originally Posted by Alastair Moonsong View Post
Question: What, exactly, differentiates EOAD (as defined by the above symptoms) from the more common affliction known to laypersons as "college"?

More serious questions:
- Are the causes of Alzheimer's disease known? Is it based in genetics, is it a response to a viral or bacterial infection? Is it caused by exposure to certain environmental factors? Or something else?

- Related to the above: Are there any lifestyle tips that if adopted early enough will ward off AD to at least some degree?

- What exactly does an Alzheimer's Advocate, well, advocate? My limited understanding of the disease is that it is incurable, has no known cause (or at least no cause that we can control or eliminate), manifests itself in a variety of symptoms, and is fatal. What can ordinary people, citizens who care but are not cutting-edge medical researchers, actually DO in order to help?
"I have college"

Okay, on to answer your more serious questions, Alastair Moonsong.

1. Yes AD can be inherited, but it's a genetic thing and has to do with mutated genes and is not supported with any kind of definitive data. In my case my neuro-guy says he's 90% sure that because my parents had "pre-senile dementia" that they passed it on to me. In other words, since I am in EOAD, there's a "good" chance I inherited it.

2. What causes Alzheimer's? Well, the most popular answer is plaques and tangles. Plaques in the form of protein (beta-amyloid) on the brain and tangles which are more nerve-cell affected by another protein called tau. Both of these together cause mis-communication in the brain, which in turn causes me to do goofy shit, like put the car keys in the fridge while loading it with groceries, and then not being able to find them.

Bill: Honey!!! Have you seen the car keys????

Dondra: Check the fridge, Babe

Another cause is head injury: if a person falls down and strikes his head, for instance. If that person is a serious risk for falling, he or she may be well on the way.

And then there is the inheritance factor, of course

3. Lifestyle tips to ward off AD: Keep your heart and lungs healthy by exercising. In my reading, I have found that people who do not smoke and/or drink, watch their diet etc., are at a lesser risk than those who do.

4. What does an "Advocate" advocate?: Well, my primary job is to contact the congress-persons within my district and bug the shit out of them to provide funding for AD research. I guess you could also call me a "lobbyist" (but please, not to my face, okay?).

And you are correct, of course that right now it is incurable and fatal, and is second behind cancer as the most feared disease in the world. And yes, Alastair Moonglow there is something everyone can do to help: Think of yourself as having this disease, forgetting words, events, paying your bills, and so many other symptoms, and you'll know what to do. As a matter of fact, you're doing it already, and thank you!

Bill
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Last edited by Quasimodem; 05-11-2009 at 11:55 AM..
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  #13  
Old 05-11-2009, 11:59 AM
Quasimodem Quasimodem is offline
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Originally Posted by mnemosyne View Post
My FIL is a psychiatrist, and he said that there is a pretty standard test of about 30 questions used in the initial analysis of a patient who may have Alheimers or other dementia.

Apparently the only question that matters* is the "time" one; have the patient draw a clock on a blank piece of paper, and set the clock at "ten-past-ten".

Did you have that test/question, and how did you do?

*matters in the sense that many people might not remember whether today is the 10th or the 11th, and being able to count backwards from 100 by 7s is difficult for a lot of normal people, etc. This came about during a rather drunken dinner conversation, so don't take my recollection of the test/conversation as any type of serious reference!
I had that question, although I was not asked to mark the time, mnemosyne. As far as I know, I passed that one. I missed the season and the date as well as the month. I also wake up not knowing what day it is, quite frequently. i go to my computer for that.

Thanks for your questions everyone, and please keep them coming. This really is good for me!

Speaking of doctors, time for me to go back to mine to check on how I'm doing. I will be back later, though - fair warning!

Bill

Last edited by Quasimodem; 05-11-2009 at 12:01 PM..
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  #14  
Old 05-11-2009, 12:41 PM
DMark DMark is offline
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Originally Posted by Quasimodem View Post

I cannot count backward from 100 by 7's.
Hmm...if problems counting backwards by 7's is a sign, I think I have had EOAD since I was 18.

First of all, Quasi, thanks for putting my name in a thread title - I feel so honored; first time anyone has done that!

I think all people of a "certain age' begin to experience certain "senior moments"..."OK, I am in the kitchen now - what in the hell did I come here to get?!" I mean, I teach college students and some of them are about as spacey as it gets (forgetting their laptops in the library, losing car keys, coming to class on the wrong day) - whereas I know some older people who will be mid-conversation and forget what they wanted to say - but then remember a few minutes later.

My question is: How do you determine if a "normal senior moment" is indeed normal, or a sign of something more serious? Frequency of these moments? Severity of the act (for example: forgetting to turn off the gas stove)?
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Old 05-11-2009, 12:42 PM
Great Dave Great Dave is offline
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Is there anything besides exercise and diet that you do, such as crosswords or sudoku? Is there any reason to believe that these will help?
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Old 05-11-2009, 01:55 PM
RedRosesForMe RedRosesForMe is offline
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What do you mean by fatal? Though I feel dumb now for asking, I always assumed that Alzheimer's was a quality of life issue that had no bearing on how long you would live. In other words, assuming you had adequate support and supervision so you weren't forgetting to eat or wandering off and getting lost in the street, you'd just..... live, but with decreasing awareness of reality.

Totally wrong?
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Old 05-11-2009, 02:09 PM
Mosier Mosier is offline
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Originally Posted by Great Dave View Post
Is there anything besides exercise and diet that you do, such as crosswords or sudoku? Is there any reason to believe that these will help?
I remember reading something about a possible link between mercury levels and alzheimers. It was a long time ago and might have been debunked by now, though. If that connection is true, though, you can help to prevent alzheimers by avoiding tuna, which if I remember correctly is the most likely way to become exposed to lots of mercury.
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Old 05-11-2009, 02:22 PM
Mama Zappa Mama Zappa is offline
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You mention forgetfulness "within 20 minutes of being told a very significant thing. ".

Does that thing (whatever it is) make any impression on your memory, like if someone tells you again, you go "Oh yeah! You told me that before "? Or when you're retold, is it as if you were hearing it for the first time all over again?

What sort of tools (mechanical, paper/pencil, whatever) do you use to help keep on top of things? (Typo Knig and I use Palm Pilots, which we refer to as our portable brains. The downside of this of course is WHAT IF WE LOSE THE PALM PILOT????? Coping mechanism there in my case: avoid putting it in a case that is the same color as the car's floor mat ).

Last edited by Mama Zappa; 05-11-2009 at 02:25 PM..
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Old 05-11-2009, 02:38 PM
MadTheSwine MadTheSwine is offline
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My mom constantly tells me things she has told me the previous day,just trivial stuff,like ""I talked to so and so the other day". Is that a symptom?
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Old 05-11-2009, 03:32 PM
purple haze purple haze is offline
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How are you emotions affected?
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Old 05-11-2009, 03:44 PM
aruvqan aruvqan is online now
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Originally Posted by Quasimodem View Post
In closing, let me add that although I am considered stage 3, I do have one of the symptoms in stage 4 already. I cannot count backward from 100 by 7's.

I hope this answers your question and thanks very much for your interest!

Bill
Crap, I cant do that without counting on my fingers right now ....

I seem to remember you are getting remarried, does it change the possibility of going back to Germany for a better familial support situation?
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Old 05-11-2009, 04:08 PM
Tannim Tannim is offline
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How is EOAD different from other types of Dimentia?

Does it come in episodes where each episode leaves you in a worse place than before?
(I know that wasn't very clear but I hope you understand what I meant)
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Old 05-11-2009, 04:19 PM
DudleyGarrett DudleyGarrett is offline
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What's the most embarrassing situation EOAD has put you in?
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  #24  
Old 05-12-2009, 04:55 PM
Quasimodem Quasimodem is offline
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Originally Posted by DMark View Post
First of all, Quasi, thanks for putting my name in a thread title - I feel so honored; first time anyone has done that!
Thank you sir! If it had not been for your question, I would never have come upon the idea to do this, and by the way, I have linked my Georgia chapter of the Alzheimer's Association to this thread, so y'all keep on asking questions, okay?

To answer your question, DMark, my favorite comedian BABE (be still my racing heart!) Rita Rudner did a small bit on AD which you may be able to relate to.

To whit:

"Room-Heimer's" - Walking into a room and forgetting why you are there.

"Phone-Heimer's" - Calling someone and forgetting the reason for the call.



Okay, seriously: It's both frequency and severity.

Severity: I no longer drive because I get confused in traffic ("Did I just pull out in front of that guy????" and turning left at a red light (after seeing no traffic coming, of course - just got confused with right and left!)

Frequency: It begins with forgetting what day it is, and it gets worse from there on out. I forget my hygiene, I forget what bills are due, I forget appointments, I put things where they don't go, so consequently, I misplace things and fly into a rage when I cannot find them. This is a daily thing, my friend.

You know? The very worst thing someone can say to me is, "Oh, well I do that!"

Fuck you! How many times a day do you do "that"?????

It gets so frustrating, DMark! That is why I have the blog. I hope I answered your question correctly?

There really isn't anything wrong with you if you forget a password, but there is, if you put the car keys in the fridge, and then rage when you cannot find them.

Thanks once again for inspiring the thread. It is an honor that you thought that much of me to do do that.

Bill
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Old 05-12-2009, 05:07 PM
Quasimodem Quasimodem is offline
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Is there anything besides exercise and diet that you do, such as crosswords or sudoku? Is there any reason to believe that these will help?
Great Dave: World of Warcraft, Dude! It keeps me thinking and keeps my reflexes tuned! Plus I love the chivalry of it all. It's what I am all about, and I believe I would have made a good knight at Arthur's Round Table.

Word puzzles, Sudoku?

I can do them, but I tested out on the genius level (my IQ is in da dubble figgerz), so why bother?

Yes, I DO have trouble sometimes and I level slowly, but I have people, and you can find them in the Warcraft thread. Their names are jayjay, Mister Rik, Ferret Herder, and so many others (please forgive) whose nicks escape me right now.

Yeppie. Warcraft and my toon Wolkenlaufre. We are at level 17 and still kickin' ass.

It puts me into a different "world" where I forget about my troubles in THIS one.

Tbank you, Great Dave for the question! I heartedly advocate WoW to anyone who thinks they may be losing their fucking mind. Nothing like a quest to bring you back and give you a purpose!

Bill
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Old 05-12-2009, 05:19 PM
Quasimodem Quasimodem is offline
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[QUOTE=RedRosesForMe;11128987]What do you mean by fatal? QUOTE]


Hey Rosie! (Okay to call you that?)

I mean it's fatal. There is no cure. It's a gradual thing. It creeeeeps into the brain, genes mutate, proteins are formed, and you slowly lose it. THAT makes it deadly.

Rosie? What keeps us all hopeful is the fact that those of us who are diagnosed early enough (in either stage) still have a chance!

No, it is not an automatic death sentence, but it is an early alarm system, which makes it very important to find a cure.

Right now, it is every 72 seconds someone is diagnosed. By 2014, it will be every 32.

Thanks for asking !

Bill
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Old 05-12-2009, 05:29 PM
Quasimodem Quasimodem is offline
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Originally Posted by Mosier View Post
I remember reading something about a possible link between mercury levels and alzheimers. It was a long time ago and might have been debunked by now, though. If that connection is true, though, you can help to prevent alzheimers by avoiding tuna, which if I remember correctly is the most likely way to become exposed to lots of mercury.
You need to take that with a huge pound of salt, Mosier!

Did that item you read have as a preface, "Studies have shown......."?

If mercury were to be a determinate cause of AD, don't you think the WHO and our own government would have banned tuna by now?

My point is, why in the hell would they want us to keep eating contaminated food, if by doing so, we place a burden on our government?

"Studies" can show anything they want, Mosier. Just read the latest issue of MEN'S magazine. It is loaded with that kinda "Studies have shown....." kinda shit.

Q
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Old 05-12-2009, 05:45 PM
Quasimodem Quasimodem is offline
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Originally Posted by Mama Zappa View Post
You mention forgetfulness "within 20 minutes of being told a very significant thing. ".
To be honest Mama Z, sometimes yes, sometimes no, and here's the rub: Dondra (the one person I wholly interact with these days) is totally patient with me, and sometimes never tells me that I have asked/responded to that question before.

"You have a doctor's appointment at 8:30 in the morning hon!"

"Okay!"

5 minutes later:

"Honey? When's my appointment with Dr. Battle?"

What sort of tools do I use?: My computer. To tell me what day it is.

I just go from there, Mama Zap

Thanks

Bil

Last edited by Quasimodem; 05-12-2009 at 05:46 PM..
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  #29  
Old 05-12-2009, 05:50 PM
Quasimodem Quasimodem is offline
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Originally Posted by MadTheSwine View Post
My mom constantly tells me things she has told me the previous day,just trivial stuff,like ""I talked to so and so the other day". Is that a symptom?
I can't really say, MadTheSwine (Og, why did you pick such a horrendous nick?? Change that sumbitch, PLEASE), but check out www.alz.org and look at the ten signs. Do any of them fit?

Let me know, okay?

Thanks

Bill
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Old 05-12-2009, 05:54 PM
Quasimodem Quasimodem is offline
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How are you emotions affected?
I cry a lot, purplehaze. My emotions right now are running rampant with me.

I miss the emotion which causes arousal, and I am basically just "maintaining".

I hope I can get it back, because there is absolutely NOTHING wrong with me physically.

Thanks, my friend!

Bill
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Old 05-12-2009, 05:58 PM
Quasimodem Quasimodem is offline
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I seem to remember you are getting remarried, does it change the possibility of going back to Germany for a better familial support situation?

Yes it does. For now.

But I have at least (I hope) a little more time left (depending on how fast this shitty diseasae progresses), so with your good "vibes" maybe I can die in the land of my birth, aruvqan!

Thanks for checking in!

Bill
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  #32  
Old 05-12-2009, 06:00 PM
ivan astikov ivan astikov is offline
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Can you tell me where I've put my back-door keys?
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  #33  
Old 05-12-2009, 06:13 PM
Quasimodem Quasimodem is offline
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Originally Posted by Tannim View Post
How is EOAD different from other types of Dimentia?

Does it come in episodes where each episode leaves you in a worse place than before?
(I know that wasn't very clear but I hope you understand what I meant)
No, Tannim, it's very gradual. It doesn't progress that quickly. Think of this as a "mold" growing over your brain, and shutting out the centers of communication.

(Sorry for the "SciFi", but that is how I think of it!)

No! Your question is quite clear and here is an answer for you, courtesy of www.alz.org:

The difference between early onset AD and early stage AD—early onset, of course, referring to those diagnosed before the age of 65, and early stage meaning being in the beginning stages of AD.

Kids?

I hope I didn't give the impression that I am the "Know-It-All" of Alzeimer's Disease? I only know about what is going on with me, and I am hoping to make it more "real" for you, by "talking" to me like this.

Thanks, Tannim! Cool question!

Bill

Last edited by Quasimodem; 05-12-2009 at 06:15 PM..
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  #34  
Old 05-12-2009, 06:21 PM
Quasimodem Quasimodem is offline
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What's the most embarrassing situation EOAD has put you in?
Hey DudleyGarrett

I knew this question was coming, so I will answer as honestly as possible, okay?

I had just got a patient intubated in our trauma room and was about to hook him up to the vent.

Only the vent kept blaring alarms at me, as I was frantically hitting button after button to figure out what was wrong.

What was wrong, was that the goddam thing wasn't getting any oxygen, and it was the apnea alarms I was hearing. Luckily, one of the nurses caught my mistake and corrected it.

I decided there and then I would no longer be a danger to my patients, and yes, that was very embarrasing (and shaming).

God Damn this goddamn disease, Dudley

Bill

Last edited by Quasimodem; 05-12-2009 at 06:22 PM..
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  #35  
Old 05-12-2009, 06:24 PM
Quasimodem Quasimodem is offline
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Can you tell me where I've put my back-door keys?
Check the fridge, babe!
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  #36  
Old 05-12-2009, 06:58 PM
Tenar Tenar is offline
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Thanks for the thread, Quasimodem.

My mom suspects that my father may be in the early stages of Alzheimer's, but he claims the doctor says it's just ordinary age related changes. The things mom describes (including an apparent loss of math skills) sound a whole lot more ominous than that to me. (Actually, we doubt that Dad ever asked the doctor about Alzheimer's/dementia. I have been trying to get my mother to talk to the MD and ask him to "spontaneously" ask Dad about it rather than waiting for him to bring it up. I assume this wouldn't violate HIPAA, since Mom would be giving the doctor information about Dad rather than asking for it.)

My question to you is, if you know, do regular general practitioners/family doctors/whatever ever pre-screen people for Alzheimer's, or do they have to go to a psychiatrist to even get the question asked?

Thanks again, and I hope you are here for the cure. Never give up.
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  #37  
Old 05-12-2009, 07:33 PM
Quasimodem Quasimodem is offline
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Okay here come the questions, Tenar:

1. How old is Dad?
2. How old is Dad's Doc? (it makes a diffrerence, believe me!)

And my final answer is:

1. Depending on his age, he needs "staging". Has this not been done?
Sorry to spring such terminology on you, but we need to get "Dad' on some kind of "base level", so that he can be treated correctly.

2. No. If the doctor has seen the patient for a number of years, he is very likely to "downplay" the symtoms, just to "placate" the patient and the family.

Do not let that happen, okay?

You stay on top of things ALL THE TIME Tenar, and advocate. Please!

Thanks

Bill
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  #38  
Old 05-13-2009, 04:18 AM
Scissorjack Scissorjack is offline
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Thanks for starting this thread, Quasi: you've got a set of balls to match your courage, dignity and good humour. Feel free not to answer this question if it's too close to the bone, but do you ever despair? Threads about dealing with reltives with Alzheimers sometimes come up, and one of the most common comments is "if I'm ever diagnosed with that, I'm checking out early": did you ever feel like that? Do you ever feel like that?
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  #39  
Old 05-13-2009, 10:37 AM
Rigamarole Rigamarole is offline
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Originally Posted by Quasimodem View Post
I also wake up not knowing what day it is, quite frequently. i go to my computer for that.
Don't worry, I do that all the time and I'm 23 (and pretty sure I don't have Alzheimer's).
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Old 05-13-2009, 11:05 AM
Marley23 Marley23 is offline
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Don't worry, I do that all the time and I'm 23 (and pretty sure I don't have Alzheimer's).
Should I be applauding a skillful whoosh, or pointing to post 24?
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Old 05-13-2009, 12:14 PM
Snooooopy Snooooopy is offline
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Did you ever see that episode of Law & Order: Criminal Intent that revolved around someone with EOAD?
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Old 05-13-2009, 12:46 PM
Quasimodem Quasimodem is offline
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Originally Posted by Scissorjack View Post
Thanks for starting this thread, Quasi: you've got a set of balls to match your courage, dignity and good humour. Feel free not to answer this question if it's too close to the bone, but do you ever despair? Threads about dealing with reltives with Alzheimers sometimes come up, and one of the most common comments is "if I'm ever diagnosed with that, I'm checking out early": did you ever feel like that? Do you ever feel like that?
I did and I do, Scissorjack. Mostly when it's the end of the day, when I have forgotten things (such as paying bills), or even just looking in the mirror, so I try to avoid looking in the mirror. Now that Dondra is back in my life, much of that burden has been lifted.

Do I want to do away with myself?

No, Not yet, Scissorjack. I have two beautiful grandchildren and a son who would be too badly hurt by such a decision. Could I make a decision like that when the disease progresses?

I don't know.

It's an important question, and I thank you for asking it, Scissorjack.

Bill
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Old 05-13-2009, 03:23 PM
Scissorjack Scissorjack is offline
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Thank you, Bill.

Rob
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  #44  
Old 05-13-2009, 03:29 PM
Quasimodem Quasimodem is offline
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Originally Posted by Snooooopy View Post
Did you ever see that episode of Law & Order: Criminal Intent that revolved around someone with EOAD?
No, can't say as I ever have, Snooooopy. I will watch for it, though!

Thanks

Bill
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  #45  
Old 05-13-2009, 03:30 PM
MsWhich MsWhich is offline
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Thanks again for doing this thread, Quasi. Just to address one thing, though: I'm pretty sure that what makes early-onset Alzheimer's early-onset is that it strikes before age 65.

This thing runs in my family, too, so I'm unfortunately a little more familiar with it than I'd like to be.
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Old 05-13-2009, 03:46 PM
Quasimodem Quasimodem is offline
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Yes, that's right, MsWhatsit. It differentiates it from "Early Stage" Alzheimer's.

If I didn't make that clear, I should have and I apologize.

Bill
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Old 05-13-2009, 04:03 PM
Simmerdown Simmerdown is offline
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How do you handle yourself when you have an event or an episode (not sure of the terminology) in a public setting? Do you have to give a lengthy explanation, or do you brush it off and move on? Does it even happen?
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  #48  
Old 05-13-2009, 04:12 PM
Quasimodem Quasimodem is offline
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It has happened, Simmerdown. It has happened while driving (getting confused and disoriented) and I just pull over and think things through till I am back on track.

Now I don't drive.

In the grocery store, signing a check or credit card slip: I simply say "I have Parkinson's sorry" when my hands shake.

Sometimes the first words out of my mouth are, "Please be patient with me......." when dealing with a situation requiring my attention. That happens mostly on the phone.

People have been very kind in understanding.

But I have become somewhat of a recluse, Simmerdown.

Thanks

Bill
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  #49  
Old 05-13-2009, 05:06 PM
janis_and_c0 janis_and_c0 is offline
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Do You ever have a tendancy to blame yourself for the problems you experience with the EOAD?
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  #50  
Old 05-13-2009, 05:29 PM
Zyada Zyada is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Quasimodem View Post

You know? The very worst thing someone can say to me is, "Oh, well I do that!"

Fuck you! How many times a day do you do "that"?????
If I've ever made you think that, I apologize. Some of the problems that you are now dealing with are similar to what I've had to deal with because of ADD, but I've had my entire life to get used to them and know how to work around them.

With the people who would say "Oh I do/have done that", I found it very useful for me to pick something very unusual from my childhood for an example. (Having my own "isolation booth" in second grade usually works)


My first question is are you losing your sense memory? So that, if you're a touch typist, is that going?

My second question is: I read health news from a lot of different sources, and I think I'm pretty good at separating the wheat from the chaff. I see articles related to Alzheimers quite a bit; would you like me to pass on any I think you might be interested in? Or are you already getting that from fourty-leven people?

And if rjk and I swing through Atlanta this summer, would you be interested in getting together for a meet-up?
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