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  #1  
Old 08-24-2009, 07:28 PM
UncleFred UncleFred is offline
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Are the Mounties Still Mounted?

Does the RCMP still use horses for any active policing duty, and beyond anything other than ceremonial purposes? A visit to their website, and a peek at wikipedia, imply they only have a ceremonial unit, the "Musical Ride". Also they offer to train mounted units from other forces.

If they don't still have an active unit - when did they stop?

Mounted units aren't necessarily obsolete - until recently I believe the Massachusetts State Police had a mounted unit that was very practical for things liike crowd control and off-road searches.

(PS I'm aware Canada has police forces other than the RCMP.)
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  #2  
Old 08-24-2009, 07:33 PM
RickJay RickJay is online now
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I don't beleive so. According to the RCMP website they haven't used horses in duty since before World War II.

There are mounted cops in Canada, but mostly in big cities, and of course big cities have their own police forces so the RCMP would have no role in such things.
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  #3  
Old 08-24-2009, 07:38 PM
Rumor_Watkins Rumor_Watkins is offline
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Originally Posted by RickJay View Post
I don't beleive so. According to the RCMP website they haven't used horses in duty since before World War II.

There are mounted cops in Canada, but mostly in big cities, and of course big cities have their own police forces so the RCMP would have no role in such things.
I have an amazing photo of 2 Toronto Police Service mounted units giving a ticket to a car (pulled over) on the side of the road. It's quite amusing.

Last edited by Rumor_Watkins; 08-24-2009 at 07:38 PM..
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  #4  
Old 08-24-2009, 08:02 PM
Flutterby Flutterby is offline
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I thought they were, I've seen some at times, but thinking on when I've seen them it was ceremonial. According to their website equitation was discontinued in 1966 for new members. So unless they sign up for the musical ride, they don't get that training.

However, there is a mounted unit in Calgary (not RCMP, city police). They travel the paths in the parks and certain streets. As I understand it, they are excellent for riot situations.
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  #5  
Old 08-24-2009, 08:31 PM
Larry Mudd Larry Mudd is offline
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The Vancouver Police Department also has mounted police - they are quite impressive for crowd control. We're getting some more, in preparation for the Olympics next year.

As for the RCMP, it's rare to see them doing regular police work on horseback, despite what you may have gathered from Due South.
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  #6  
Old 08-24-2009, 09:11 PM
Slithy Tove Slithy Tove is offline
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  #7  
Old 08-24-2009, 09:47 PM
astorian astorian is offline
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Today, the Mounties are more or less Canada's FBI (with a touch of the CIA, too). Horses wouldn't be much use to the FBI, would they?
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  #8  
Old 08-24-2009, 09:49 PM
Rumor_Watkins Rumor_Watkins is offline
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Originally Posted by astorian View Post
Today, the Mounties are more or less Canada's FBI (with a touch of the CIA, too). Horses wouldn't be much use to the FBI, would they?
I'm not so sure that's true - they largely serve as the police force for the vast majority of canada which isn't under the control of a large-enough jurisdiction, right?
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  #9  
Old 08-24-2009, 09:50 PM
Mahaloth Mahaloth is offline
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Originally Posted by Rumor_Watkins View Post
I have an amazing photo of 2 Toronto Police Service mounted units giving a ticket to a car (pulled over) on the side of the road. It's quite amusing.
Do you have it on your computer? You should share it with us.
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Old 08-24-2009, 09:51 PM
Rumor_Watkins Rumor_Watkins is offline
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Do you have it on your computer? You should share it with us.
let me go dig it up...
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  #11  
Old 08-24-2009, 10:01 PM
Rumor_Watkins Rumor_Watkins is offline
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http://img35.imageshack.us/img35/2226/tps.gif
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  #12  
Old 08-24-2009, 10:12 PM
dtilque dtilque is offline
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Originally Posted by Rumor_Watkins View Post
I'm not so sure that's true - they largely serve as the police force for the vast majority of canada which isn't under the control of a large-enough jurisdiction, right?
That was my understanding as well. Criminal law (e.g. murder, kidnapping, assault, etc.) in Canada is a national thing and the Mounties enforce it outside of the larger cities and towns. So they are also the equivalent of the various State Patrols in the US.

How about dog sleds? Is Sgt Preston still mooshing around the Yukon these days? Or has King been retired in favor of snowmobiles?
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Old 08-24-2009, 11:11 PM
AHarris AHarris is online now
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Originally Posted by dtilque View Post
That was my understanding as well. Criminal law (e.g. murder, kidnapping, assault, etc.) in Canada is a national thing and the Mounties enforce it outside of the larger cities and towns. So they are also the equivalent of the various State Patrols in the US.
Not quite, the RCMP provides provincial and municipal policing on a contract basis. The provinces and territories are free to setup their own police forces to handle crimes if they want. Only Ontario and Quebec have their own police forces at the moment.

In areas where they aren't contracted to provide policing, they still police the 'national mandate' (white collar crime, national security issues, etc)

For more information:
http://www.rcmp-grc.gc.ca/fs-fd/corp...lectif-eng.htm

IMHO, the state/federal divide isn't as strong in Canada as it is in the US (ie all murder is covered by the federal statute).
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  #14  
Old 08-24-2009, 11:14 PM
Raygun99 Raygun99 is offline
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The analogy I use is that they're kind of like a combination of state troopers, US marshals, the FBI and the Secret Service.
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Old 08-24-2009, 11:29 PM
RickJay RickJay is online now
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Originally Posted by Larry Mudd View Post
The Vancouver Police Department also has mounted police - they are quite impressive for crowd control. We're getting some more, in preparation for the Olympics next year.
I'm pretty sure all big cities have mounted units. You can go into the horse barn in Toronto and pet the police horses.

A man on horseback who's pissed off at you is still terrifying to a person on foot. It's very intimidating, and any city worth its salt will have mounted police for crown control.
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  #16  
Old 08-25-2009, 05:50 AM
astorian astorian is offline
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Originally Posted by RickJay View Post
I'm pretty sure all big cities have mounted units. You can go into the horse barn in Toronto and pet the police horses.

A man on horseback who's pissed off at you is still terrifying to a person on foot. It's very intimidating, and any city worth its salt will have mounted police for crown control.
I still remember the 9th inning of the last game of the 1980 World Series. Normally, you'd expect Philadelphia fans to swarm the field the moment the Phillies won the World Series, but there were dozens of mounted cops on the field, just DARING someone to leave the stands.

Yeah, mighty intimidating.
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  #17  
Old 08-25-2009, 06:53 AM
Wendell Wagner Wendell Wagner is offline
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Incidentally, there are auxiliary police on horseback in New York City.
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  #18  
Old 08-25-2009, 06:54 AM
Wendell Wagner Wendell Wagner is offline
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Forgot to include this:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Yor...rcement_Patrol
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  #19  
Old 08-25-2009, 08:53 AM
Hari Seldon Hari Seldon is offline
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Montreal has a municipal police force with some mounted police, but I have never seen them except on Mt. Royal where, I believe, they are largely ceremonial.
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  #20  
Old 08-25-2009, 10:21 AM
Hello Again Hello Again is offline
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Originally Posted by Wendell Wagner View Post
Incidentally, there are auxiliary police on horseback in New York City.
There are two mounted forces in NYC.

The Mounted NYPD has a primarily street patrol and crowd-control function. They are not an "auxilliary" or volunteer unit - they are a fulltime professional division of the NYPD and are considered an elite unit actually.

However, The Mounted Park Rangers (AKA NYC Parks Enforcement Patrol Mounted Auxiliary Unit), are an auxiliary patrol force made up of volunteers. They have no law enforcement authority.
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  #21  
Old 08-25-2009, 10:52 AM
storyguide3 storyguide3 is offline
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Originally Posted by AHarris View Post
The provinces and territories are free to setup their own police forces to handle crimes if they want. Only Ontario and Quebec have their own police forces at the moment.
Actually The Royal Newfoundland Constabulary is also a provincial force, though for various reasons they do not currently provide complete coverage. The RCMP is contracted by the provincial government to provide policing in most rural areas.

For more info on the RNC, see their website.

To stay at least a little closer to topic, the RNC does have a mounted unit, more info at here.
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  #22  
Old 08-25-2009, 11:02 AM
Johnny L.A. Johnny L.A. is online now
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Are the Mounties Still Mounted?

Whenever I see the thread title I get the image of a stuffed Mountie in a museum.

Or a Mountie's head (wearing the hat, natch) mounted on a plaque and hanging on a wall.
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  #23  
Old 08-25-2009, 11:15 AM
Zsofia Zsofia is offline
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Originally Posted by RickJay View Post
I'm pretty sure all big cities have mounted units. You can go into the horse barn in Toronto and pet the police horses.

A man on horseback who's pissed off at you is still terrifying to a person on foot. It's very intimidating, and any city worth its salt will have mounted police for crown control.
Not just big cities - here in Columbia, SC, we have a few mounted cops. Very useful for festivals and such, and for public relations. I've read they're going to step up mounted patrols in Five Points, which is a fantastic idea.

A few years ago two of their horses died in a tragic car accident (they were in a horse trailer). It was really sad, and the memorial service was very well attended. They haven't been replaced because of the expense, but I think the mounted patrols (particularly if they put more of them in Five Points) are very useful and a very good way to increase police presence in places where there are a lot of stupid drunk college kids.
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  #24  
Old 08-25-2009, 11:41 AM
Spoons Spoons is offline
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Originally Posted by Raygun99 View Post
The analogy I use is that they're kind of like a combination of state troopers, US marshals, the FBI and the Secret Service.
This is my understanding too. AFAIK, the Mounties do everything from writing speeding tickets, arresting criminals, and keeping order; up to investigating in a crime lab and providing security to domestic and foreign dignitaries. They also make great colour guards at sporting events.
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  #25  
Old 08-25-2009, 11:48 AM
Swallowed My Cellphone Swallowed My Cellphone is offline
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Toronto has mounted cops around all the time. They are almost always in pairs. ETA: Here are a couple at a drive-thru (ride thru?) window. They do traffic stops and everything you'd expect a cop to do, but they are found in their greatest concentration when crowd control is a priority. Eg/ You'll see a whole bunch of them if there is a protest at Queens Park or something. ETA: The horses get their own riot gear if the cops are at a protest (even if it's a peaceful one). See the visors?

Cycling over horse poo is a barrel of laughs, I tells ya.

Last edited by Swallowed My Cellphone; 08-25-2009 at 11:52 AM..
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  #26  
Old 08-25-2009, 12:51 PM
Elendil's Heir Elendil's Heir is offline
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Johnny L.A., an old joke:

Q: What is taxidermy's greatest triumph?
A: The Royal Canadian Mounted Police.

A previous thread on police horses today, with links to two others: http://boards.straightdope.com/sdmb/...d.php?t=358252
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  #27  
Old 08-25-2009, 01:46 PM
Shot From Guns Shot From Guns is offline
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Mounted units aren't necessarily obsolete
Milwaukee still has some mounted units downtown, since '99. I used to hear hoofbeats outside my window occasionally, and I've seen a mounted officer cantering through a lakeside park.

In fact, if you take the Amtrak to or from Milwaukee, you'll go right by the stable. (For the longest time, I couldn't figure out why the hell someone had a bunch of horses in a paddock in Walker's Point.)
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  #28  
Old 08-26-2009, 05:09 PM
md2000 md2000 is offline
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The RCMP AFAIK do not have a mounted contingent anywhere. As for sled dogs, the last few decades, they've been replaced by snowmobiles. For chaising anyone violating some laws about off-road vehicles, etc they may also use quads. One contingent tested a Hummer for on/off road, but they don't do too well in swamp and mud.

The RCMP provide police services in small towns, remote areas, federal lands (airports, etc.) as well as highway patrol and provincial police in any province that does not have a provincial police force. (The Ontario Provincial Police, Surete de Quebec, Newfoundland Constabulary, etc. ) The RCMP are especially good at tasering to death confused Polish immigrants and then lying through their teeth on the stand.

Most recruits can expect to spend their early years in remote locations like the north, or native reserves. They handle anything from traffic offenses to domestics to burglaries to murders. Later they can bid on fancier jobs down south, or at international airports.

I remember once shutting down a whole wing of the Calgary airport for 10 minutes until the RCMP showed up, many years ago. Ninja throwing stars are illegal weapons in canada. When the trained monkeys fo the private security service find one, they have to shut all the doors and call the RCMP as it it were something truly lethal like a pistol, or bomb (can I say that at an airport?). So we stood around waiting until the RCMP came, and based on the Xray, they opened my carry-on and pulled out the ornamental glass star, laughed, and sent me on my way... Looong before 9-11.

There are additional wings of the RCMP that do white-collar crime, will investigate other police if asked, do investigations across provincial boundaries, etc. There is CSIS, a separate group whose mandate is to mess up possibly international espionage in a uniquely Canadian way; sort of like the FBI arresting Moussaoui and missing the big picture. And CSE, our also Canadian flavour of the NSA. But anything criminal and national, the RCMP has jurisdiction - biker gangs, organized crime, foreign terror groups recruiting locally (shared with CSIS), security fraud, etc. Of course, if it's a provincial law, a local provincial force may have first dibs on the case...

All criminal law in Canada is under the criminal code, is federal. All peace officers are mandated under federal law, so they are all empowered across Canada, including the Podunk Police force. It is just simpler for a small town to get their one or two officers from the RCMP than to set up their own collection of Andy Griffith and Don Knotts. The police have serious training (RCMPis still a prestige job) and answer to a hgher authority in Ottawa, so they are relatively immune to the usual pressures of a small-town police force.

For example the East St. Paul, Manitoba, police force was recently dissolved over allegations (more than allegations) that they gave a drunk driver from the Winnipeg police force a break; deliberately lied and messed up the evidence so he could not be convicted of Impaired Driving Causing Death. Simpler to teach the country a lesson, and fire 11 police officers, and get the RCMP heirarchy to replace them. Maybe next time the local police will think twice. Most local police are poeple who could not egt into the RCMP academy.

Last edited by md2000; 08-26-2009 at 05:10 PM..
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  #29  
Old 08-26-2009, 05:29 PM
Kevbo Kevbo is offline
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Originally Posted by Johnny L.A. View Post
Whenever I see the thread title I get the image of a stuffed Mountie in a museum.
Or a Mountie's head (wearing the hat, natch) mounted on a plaque and hanging on a wall.
Me too.

If I bagged one with a rack like this, it would certainly be worth mounting:

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...on_a_horse.JPG
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  #30  
Old 08-26-2009, 06:46 PM
Elendil's Heir Elendil's Heir is offline
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...The RCMP are especially good at tasering to death confused Polish immigrants and then lying through their teeth on the stand....
OK, so I'm guessing there's a story behind this. Tell us, please.
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  #31  
Old 08-26-2009, 06:55 PM
Gorsnak Gorsnak is offline
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OK, so I'm guessing there's a story behind this. Tell us, please.
Google "Robert Dziekanski". Ukrainian immigrating to join his elderly mother, got tasered (by Mounties, 5 times...he was armed with a stapler, though) at the Vancouver airport and died. Some of the Mounties testified in ways that seem to be somewhat at odds with surveillance video footage. I haven't followed the story very closely, so will not offer any further commentary.
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  #32  
Old 08-26-2009, 07:01 PM
Captain Amazing Captain Amazing is offline
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Originally Posted by Elendil's Heir View Post
OK, so I'm guessing there's a story behind this. Tell us, please.
About two years ago, there was this immigrant from Poland named Robert Dziekanski at Vancouver International Airport. There were communication problems, because his mother, who was supposed to meet him there, missed him, and because he didn't speak English, and the employees didn't speak Polish. So he got agitated and started throwing things. The police were called, and four mounties showed up. He apparently picked up a stapler, and they tasered him. He was tasered five times and died.

Somebody caught the whole incident on camera, and the police took the camera, promising to give the film back, but they didn't and the guy had to sue to get his video back. When he did and it was released to the media, it turned out that the video contradicted some of the statements the mounties had made about the case, and there are currently inquiries about the potential of police misconduct.
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  #33  
Old 08-26-2009, 09:01 PM
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I was taking part in a demonstration once that was broken up by mounted cops. I can personally testify to how terrifying it is to have an armed man on a big horse bearing down on you.

(Of course, the newspapers reported it as evil demonstrators attacking the mounted cops, which is laughable. Mounted cops are extremely intimidating, there's no way in the world unarmed and untrained people are going to attack mounted cops wielding clubs.)

The experience gave me great admiration for the courage of the infantry of the past who stood up to cavalry attacks. My instinctive reaction, and the instinctive reaction of everyone else in the crowd, was to get the hell away from the big scary guys on the bigger and scarier animals. It's fortunate that more people weren't injured in the scramble to get away... and yet, "evil unwashed hippies attack poor harmless mounted cops".

So, yeah, do not underestimate the usefulness of mounted cops when it comes to crowd control. Also do not trust news reports about who starts the violence in demonstrations.
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  #34  
Old 08-27-2009, 07:47 AM
Northern Piper Northern Piper is offline
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Originally Posted by md2000
All criminal law in Canada is under the criminal code, is federal. All peace officers are mandated under federal law, so they are all empowered across Canada, including the Podunk Police force...
While it's correct that the criminal law is federal and uniform across Canada, it's not correct that municipal and provincial police officers have authority throughout Canada.

The federal Criminal Code provides that if someone is a peace officer, they have the various powers set out in the Code for peace officers. However, provincial and municipal police officers gain their status as peace officers from the provincial law constituting provincial and municipal police forces. Since provincial laws only apply only within the province that passed them, if municipal or provincial police officers leave the province, they do not have the status of a peace officer, and therefore no longer have the authority of a peace officer under the Criminal Code.
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Old 08-27-2009, 07:55 AM
Northern Piper Northern Piper is offline
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IMHO, the state/federal divide isn't as strong in Canada as it is in the US (ie all murder is covered by the federal statute).
It depends which aspect of the federal-provincial division of powers you're comparing to the US system of federalism. Yes, criminal law is a national matter in Canada, but it is enforced by the provinces, not the federal government. Provincial prosecutors try all cases under the Criminal Code, not the federal Crowns.

As well, if you start looking at other areas, you find that the provinces have a stronger position.

For example, the federal Parliament's jurisdiction over commerce is much less than the corresponding federal power of Congress under the US commerce clause.

Nor does Parliament have the power to pass civil rights or voting rights statutes that apply to the provinces, nor to pass unfunded mandates.

As well, the Federal Court of Canada does not have any supervisory jurisdiction over the provincial courts, and Parliament does not have the authority to give the Federal Court that power.

Overall, I would argue that the provinces in Canada have a much stronger position vis--vis the federal government than do the states in the US.
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Old 08-27-2009, 07:08 PM
kfraser34 kfraser34 is offline
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Originally Posted by Elendil's Heir View Post
OK, so I'm guessing there's a story behind this. Tell us, please.
There was a thread about it that I started after Cecil's article about tasers.

http://boards.straightdope.com/sdmb/...d.php?t=516906
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  #37  
Old 08-27-2009, 07:44 PM
Elendil's Heir Elendil's Heir is offline
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Ah, thanks.
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  #38  
Old 08-28-2009, 09:51 AM
md2000 md2000 is offline
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Originally Posted by Northern Piper View Post
It depends which aspect of the federal-provincial division of powers you're comparing to the US system of federalism. Yes, criminal law is a national matter in Canada, but it is enforced by the provinces, not the federal government. Provincial prosecutors try all cases under the Criminal Code, not the federal Crowns.

As well, if you start looking at other areas, you find that the provinces have a stronger position.

For example, the federal Parliament's jurisdiction over commerce is much less than the corresponding federal power of Congress under the US commerce clause.

Nor does Parliament have the power to pass civil rights or voting rights statutes that apply to the provinces, nor to pass unfunded mandates.

As well, the Federal Court of Canada does not have any supervisory jurisdiction over the provincial courts, and Parliament does not have the authority to give the Federal Court that power.

Overall, I would argue that the provinces in Canada have a much stronger position vis--vis the federal government than do the states in the US.
We learned in History class back in the Good Old Days, that the British parliament did not want to build large strong competition out of the colonies. They therefore produced a list of jurisdictions such as international waterways, defence, criminal code, etc. that were federal and everything else was provincial.

However, the feds here have stolen the idea from the US feds - he who has the wallet calls the shots. So, for example health care is a provincial matter, run by each province; but the feds provide a decent amount of the money needs and hence set the standards to prevent service from being so poor or coverage lacking. You get almost the same (full) coverage in any province, and despite what the Fox Bozos say, I'll take it over the US system - as would about 70% or 80% of Canadians.

So the criminal law is set federally but the provinces run the courts and prosecutors. This results in the occasional tiff, such as rural western provinces refusing to enforce the feds' "Long Gun Registry". Very much politics in Canada is as much about negotiation as about fiat; but instead of negotiations like in Congress, where you have to persuade 300+ independently purchased "politicians", the negotiations are more between parties and between feds and provinces.

Canada has some things that the US should learn from - bills are written by the minister's department, usually (rules allow for some private members' bills). The committees can amend, but not beyond the original scope of the bill - i.e. you can't add a provision to build a Bridge to Nowhere onto an agricultural or communications bill, it would have to be a highway bill. Most pork is inserted at the ministerial level, and nowhere near as blatant as in Congress unless the politicians are from Quebec.

Most members are elected based on party affiliation rather than personal charm, so while a revolt of the members is possible if the leader goes too far ( think Tony Blair in Iraq) it is pretty close to political suicide.
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  #39  
Old 08-28-2009, 01:07 PM
Hypnagogic Jerk Hypnagogic Jerk is offline
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Originally Posted by md2000 View Post
We learned in History class back in the Good Old Days, that the British parliament did not want to build large strong competition out of the colonies. They therefore produced a list of jurisdictions such as international waterways, defence, criminal code, etc. that were federal and everything else was provincial.
As I understand it, it's the opposite: there are a list of competences that are provincial, but the rest is federal.

Quote:
Most pork is inserted at the ministerial level, and nowhere near as blatant as in Congress unless the politicians are from Quebec.
Can I have an example of what you'd consider "blatant pork" from politicians from Quebec?
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  #40  
Old 08-29-2009, 11:10 PM
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Chiming in to echo what's already been said - RCMP's pretty much non-mounted at this point, except for ceremonial duties, but there's a definite mounted presence in major cities - I've seen some fearsome-looking horses in downtown Toronto doing general police work, but you notice them most during events for crowd control - they were out in full force for the recent Tamil protests.

The mountie talk reminded me of Obama's recent visit to Ottawa. I thought that the mountie was a fairly universal and well-recognized symbol (thank Disney for that one!) but here's a nugget from a wrap of the American coverage of the visit:

Quote:
[CNN anchor] Fredricka Whitfield was stumped earlier in the day when Air Force One first landed in Ottawa and a line of Mounties - clad in their traditional red serge jackets and Stetsons - marched out to greet the president on the airport tarmac.

Pausing as she attempted to describe the scene to viewers, Whitfield apparently took a wild guess and referred to them as "troops."
Oh, those Canadian troops!
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  #41  
Old 08-29-2009, 11:14 PM
Sunspace Sunspace is offline
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Oh, those Canadian troops!
In other news, Mounties can wear turbans instead of Stetson hats.
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  #42  
Old 08-29-2009, 11:33 PM
Bryan Ekers Bryan Ekers is offline
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In other news, Mounties can wear turbans instead of Stetson hats.
The Canadian military is equally tolerant. Given the warrior-culture history of the Sikh, I've no objection, though I've yet to work with one in my little corner of the Army reserve.
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  #43  
Old 08-30-2009, 10:13 AM
Spoons Spoons is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by md2000
We learned in History class back in the Good Old Days, that the British parliament did not want to build large strong competition out of the colonies. They therefore produced a list of jurisdictions such as international waterways, defence, criminal code, etc. that were federal and everything else was provincial.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hypnagogic Jerk
As I understand it, it's the opposite: there are a list of competences that are provincial, but the rest is federal.
You both might want to check out sections 91 and 92, and other sections in the 90s in the Canadian Constitution--which powers are federal and which are provincial are explicitly spelled out. It's true that unless a power or responsibility is stated as provincial, it will be federal whether it is stated as such or not; and this has tended to happen when advances in technology etc. mean that both the provinces and the feds lay claim to a responsibility (for example, settling the question of who is responsible for governing aviation and cable TV, neither of which existed in 1867). But given ss. 91 and 92 (and the others), it is obvious that in the 1860s when the document was originally drafted, the drafters tried to specify, then divide up, all the powers they could think of.
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Old 08-30-2009, 11:52 AM
Sunspace Sunspace is offline
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Originally Posted by Bryan Ekers View Post
The Canadian military is equally tolerant. Given the warrior-culture history of the Sikh, I've no objection, though I've yet to work with one in my little corner of the Army reserve.
Here's an Canadian Air Force officer in a sky-blue turban.
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  #45  
Old 08-31-2009, 12:44 AM
Northern Piper Northern Piper is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by md2000 View Post
We learned in History class back in the Good Old Days, that the British parliament did not want to build large strong competition out of the colonies. They therefore produced a list of jurisdictions such as international waterways, defence, criminal code, etc. that were federal and everything else was provincial.
I think you should ask for a refund. The British North America Act wasn't drafted by the British - it was drafted by the Fathers of Confederation, at three different conferences - Charlotteown, Quebec, and London.

The Quebec Resolutions, which were drafted without any input from the British, became the basis for the BNA Act, now the Constitution Act, 1867. If you compare resolutions 29 and 43 to sections 91 and 92 of the BNA Act, you'll see that the basic outline of the division of powers was decided at the Quebec Conference, by the Fathers of Confederation.
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  #46  
Old 08-31-2009, 02:25 PM
furryman furryman is offline
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Does the RCMP still fight mustachioed villains who wear capes and top hats?

Last edited by furryman; 08-31-2009 at 02:25 PM..
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  #47  
Old 09-03-2009, 09:49 AM
Nutster Nutster is offline
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Originally Posted by furryman View Post
Does the RCMP still fight mustachioed villains who wear capes and top hats?
Replace the capes with leather jackets and the top hats with helmets (fashions change, you know?) and we now call them Hell's Angels. And, yup, the RCMP still go after them for various nefarious deeds.
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  #48  
Old 09-03-2009, 01:18 PM
Rodd Hill Rodd Hill is offline
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Originally Posted by mattomic View Post
Chiming in to echo what's already been said - RCMP's pretty much non-mounted at this point, except for ceremonial duties, but there's a definite mounted presence in major cities - I've seen some fearsome-looking horses in downtown Toronto doing general police work, but you notice them most during events for crowd control - they were out in full force for the recent Tamil protests.

The mountie talk reminded me of Obama's recent visit to Ottawa. I thought that the mountie was a fairly universal and well-recognized symbol (thank Disney for that one!) but here's a nugget from a wrap of the American coverage of the visit:



Oh, those Canadian troops!
Well, strictly speaking, regular members of the RCMP are considered "Class C Reserves," so they might, in a world of stretching, be considered "troops."

The scarlet jacket by the way, is the direct descendant of the original North-West Mounted Police uniform of 1873, which was basically the then-current British Army mounted infantry getup--including a dear little pillbox cap, since discarded for the more practical and macho wide-brim stetson.

The RCMP and its predecessors have acted as active military forces a number of times: in the 1885 North-West Rebellion (oh, sorry, "Resistance"), "B" Squadron of the RNWMP went to Sibera as a mounted troop in 1919, the Canadian 1st Infantry Division used the RCMP as its provost force (military police), and my own father, who joined the RCMP in 1951, received full infantry training with his intake cadre at Camp Borden--small arms, bren, vickers, mortars, the whole bit--as it was intended to send them to Korea as provost for the Canadian contingent there. Never happened, as it turned out.

On a side note, my father sometimes pulled duty at Ottawa airport in the early 1950s while a freshly-minted constable; the order of dress at the time was brown serge tunic, peaked hat, baggy riding pants and high brown boots. Several times he was asked by arriving tourists (mostly US folks) where they could see a mountie, and refused to believe he was one, since he was dressed in brown, not red.

He did do one hell of a Nelson Eddy impersonation, though.
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  #49  
Old 09-03-2009, 03:02 PM
Elendil's Heir Elendil's Heir is offline
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Originally Posted by Nutster View Post
...And, yup, the RCMP still go after them for various nefarious deeds.
Do Canadians refer to the RCMP, as an organization, in the plural or the singular? "The RCMP still go" or "The RCMP still goes"?

FYI, a brief history: http://www.cbc.ca/news/background/rcmp/

Its precursor's first uniform: http://www.rcmp-grc.gc.ca/hist/hnud-...no-uni-eng.htm
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  #50  
Old 09-03-2009, 04:31 PM
Gorsnak Gorsnak is offline
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"The RCMP" is always singular, just as "the police" is. Individual officers might be referred to as "the RCMP" as well, as in, "I had my cruise set at 125 and got pulled over, but I said I was late for a funeral and the RCMP let me off with a warning." It's more common that individual officers be called Mounties though, singular or plural depending on how many there are.
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