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  #1  
Old 04-19-2010, 02:34 AM
Aspidistra Aspidistra is offline
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Adding a third storey - insane, or feasible?

For reasons which I won't bore you with (well, unless you want me to ) I'm exploring the idea of adding some extra rooms to our house. This is an old brick terrace house ("row house" I think you call them?) which was originally single storey, but has had the attic converted to an upstairs bedroom.

There's no garden. The only way to go is...up! Ideally, what I want to end up with is two storey's all the way along, and a single (large!) attic room on top of that, making 3 floors in total.

I've never renovated before. Is this crazy talk? The foundations are good, but obviously weren't intended to hold more than the original one floor of weight. Anyone ever done anything like this?
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  #2  
Old 04-19-2010, 07:42 PM
Alpha Twit Alpha Twit is offline
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It's probably possible but I wouldn't bet on it being much cheaper than a complete tear down and rebuild. An architect and probably an engineer would most likely need to be consulted.
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Old 04-19-2010, 08:31 PM
zagloba zagloba is offline
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Second story additions on detached homes are common in the bay area. I agree that you will need an onsite professional assessment whether the walls and foundation of your home are strong enough.

Have you ever seen such an addition on a terraced house in your area? You need to find out whether building codes would even allow what you're contemplating. I'd imagine you'll need the cooperation, if not the approval, of your neighbors as well.
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Old 04-20-2010, 06:35 AM
Aspidistra Aspidistra is offline
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Oh, I'd certainly never try to do something like this without talking to an architect. I'm just trying to get a feel for whether he'd laugh me out of the office

The reason why I wonder about adding rooms as opposed to a full rebuild is that we don't need to make any changes to the plumbing or kitchen fixtures - and as I understand it, that's the expensive bit of a house. Also, my thrifty soul rebels at the thought of knocking down a perfectly good house just to make it bigger. Even if it would, in fact, be cheaper. (yeah, you're right, I AM insane)
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Old 04-22-2010, 08:44 AM
aceplace57 aceplace57 is offline
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I'd suggest a dormer. It doesn't require nearly as much work. It only requires work on the back side of the house.

This shed dormer adds 440 sq feet to your house.
It's a good example of what can be done.
Your architect could design something similar to fit your house.
http://www.thehousedesigners.com/pla...p?PlanNum=5176

Last edited by aceplace57; 04-22-2010 at 08:45 AM..
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Old 04-22-2010, 09:30 AM
aceplace57 aceplace57 is offline
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This book excerpt is a good read on shed dormers.
Designed correctly, they can be very attractive. This book has a picture of one.

http://books.google.com/books?id=Z8f...dormer&f=false

Last edited by aceplace57; 04-22-2010 at 09:32 AM..
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  #7  
Old 04-22-2010, 09:45 AM
kambuckta kambuckta is offline
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Depending on where you live, there might be council restrictions on adding a new storey to your house Aspidistra. Especially if the street has heritage-protection status, you might not be allowed to change the facade of the property and sometimes that includes adding an upstairs (even if it is keeping with the 'vibe' of the original architecture).

However, that being said, there are LOTS AND LOTS of houses in the inner burbs undergoing pretty radical transformations. And those terrace houses are prime for getting a makeover. Provided you don't share walls with neighbours either side**, I can't see any reason why you wouldn't get the necessary permit/s to do whatever the hell you like to improve your property.

**And even if you do share adjoining walls, the neighbours have to come up with a darned good reason to reject your application.

Go for it, and good luck!!
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  #8  
Old 04-30-2010, 01:21 PM
Winston Smith Winston Smith is offline
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Anything is possible, if you have the money.

Step 1: Talk to the office that issues building permits and make sure they'll let you.
Step 2: Talk to an architect and get a general sense of the cost
Step 3: ...
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  #9  
Old 05-20-2010, 10:02 AM
EvilTOJ EvilTOJ is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Winston Smith View Post
Anything is possible, if you have the money.

Step 1: Talk to the office that issues building permits and make sure they'll let you.
Step 2: Talk to an architect and get a general sense of the cost
Step 3: ...
Obviously Step 3 is Hi Opal!
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  #10  
Old 05-27-2010, 11:40 AM
Sparky812 Sparky812 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Winston Smith View Post
Anything is possible, if you have the money.
Exactly!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Winston Smith View Post
Step 2: Talk to an architect and get a general sense of the cost
Actually, you would need a structural engineer as opposed to an architect but they may employ one.
Basically, it depends on your foundation and the load support. Of course, this can be added or modified but the work involved and price may be inhibitive.
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