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  #51  
Old 01-28-2012, 08:37 PM
CookingWithGas CookingWithGas is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alice The Goon View Post
I do not like the p-word. I don't mind the c-word, though.
[George Carlin]Certain ladies decided, "Those are the two I'm not going to say. Fuck and shit are OK, but P and C are OUT![/George Carlin]
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  #52  
Old 01-28-2012, 08:50 PM
california jobcase california jobcase is offline
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Cent is NOT plural.

An alum is an astringent aluminum compound, not an alumnus. This is more enraging to me when I read it, since someone saying it pronounces it uh-LUM, but that still sounds lazy to me.

I hate the word feel used to mean think and the word share used to mean tell.

Preplanning is redundant and grating. All planning is "pre-" by definition.
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  #53  
Old 01-28-2012, 09:14 PM
Obeseus Obeseus is offline
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Originally Posted by Khadaji View Post
Sustained definition 5.
Yeah, but I don't think that applies when someone died from the broken bones.
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  #54  
Old 01-28-2012, 09:32 PM
Maiira Maiira is offline
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People using the word "discrete" or "discretely" in the wrong context. For example: "I can trust my best friend in the world to be discrete about my affair."

People, it's "discreet." DISCREET. I have seen this misspelled so many times that I often wonder if its spelling has officially changed and I just wasn't aware of it. I know "discrete" is an actual word, but it doesn't have the same meaning!
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  #55  
Old 01-28-2012, 10:46 PM
loshan loshan is offline
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Originally Posted by ballardfam View Post
Think Ron Burgandy, "This is my lady". Just smarmy.
My Dad does this and it irks the hell out of me. He says "lady" with a condescending, patronizing inflection that pisses me off.
It apparently irks the hell out of other women too, seeing as how he is currently on wife number five.
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  #56  
Old 01-28-2012, 10:58 PM
loshan loshan is offline
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Ohhh. I forgot one I've seen a lot lately (on a certain message board). "Premiss". It pinged my radar enough, I looked it up.
That is the Old English spelling. Drives me crazy. It's "premise". Don't argue with me because your premise has no standing.
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  #57  
Old 01-28-2012, 10:59 PM
Súil Dubh Súil Dubh is offline
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The misspelling "rediculous".

People! Spell-checkers exist for a reason!
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  #58  
Old 01-28-2012, 11:02 PM
matt_mcl matt_mcl is offline
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Originally Posted by loshan View Post
Ohhh. I forgot one I've seen a lot lately (on a certain message board). "Premiss". It pinged my radar enough, I looked it up.
That is the Old English spelling. Drives me crazy. It's "premise". Don't argue with me because your premise has no standing.
"Premiss" was the spelling used throughout the Logic course I had to take for my linguistics B.A. Drove me nuts. (Like that poetry textbook that insisted on spelling it "rime" throughout, which until then I had reserved for Coleridge and frost [not the capitalized kind].)
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  #59  
Old 01-28-2012, 11:07 PM
matt_mcl matt_mcl is offline
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Originally Posted by missred View Post
Due to.

Use because of or reword the phrase entirely. I've kicked back reports for editing that have contained due to three times in the same sentence. It drives me nuts!
The rule I learned was that "due to" can only be used to mean "attributable to," so that you can say "the loss was due to enemy action" but not "Due to circumstances beyond our control..."

However, it's a rather fine distinction ("because of," for example, works in both contexts) and I think the battle over this one may have been lost.
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  #60  
Old 01-28-2012, 11:08 PM
matt_mcl matt_mcl is offline
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Originally Posted by loshan View Post
My Dad does this and it irks the hell out of me. He says "lady" with a condescending, patronizing inflection that pisses me off.
It apparently irks the hell out of other women too, seeing as how he is currently on wife number five.
Oh! This has been mentioned in a few threads, but whenever someone refers to a woman as "a female" outside of a scientific or police context. My step-grandfather does this and it weirds me out ("So I saw these two females walking down the street...") As I have previously noted, it makes him sound like a Ferengi.

Last edited by matt_mcl; 01-28-2012 at 11:08 PM..
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  #61  
Old 01-28-2012, 11:19 PM
Onomatopoeia Onomatopoeia is online now
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Another vote for nice, but when it's used as a synonym for impressive, and especially when its pronounced "noice".
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  #62  
Old 01-28-2012, 11:42 PM
faithfool faithfool is offline
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Illegitimate, when specifically used regarding people. Usually the only ones who say this are judging another person. It drives me batty.
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  #63  
Old 01-28-2012, 11:53 PM
Noel Prosequi Noel Prosequi is offline
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The complaint about "pleaded" above is exactly the reverse for me. In Commonwealth jurisdictions (subject to what Canadians may say) "pled" is treated as an outré Americanism, although it is seen from time to time. It is in the same family of Americanisms as dispensing with definite and indefinite articles ("Plaintiff sues Defendant in tort for negligence." is a perfectly cromulent sentence in American jurisprudence, and perfectly odd to my ears.)

Similar oddities are the overuse of gerunds like "holding" and "showing": "A holding in favor of plaintiff requires a showing of the following facts..."

Can't say I actually hate these things, but their jarring quality interrupts my reading.
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  #64  
Old 01-29-2012, 12:09 AM
crookedteeth crookedteeth is offline
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I hate when people type "do to" when they should type "due to". For some reason it bothers me more than other misspellings/word confusions.

I also hate it when another woman calls me "sister". This is probably because my boss does this, and she's a super bitch.
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  #65  
Old 01-29-2012, 12:49 AM
JustinC JustinC is offline
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Incubus, Alice The Goon, Onomatopoeia and all who dislike the use of the rather shallow adjective nice, may rest easier if you think of this and this upon hearing it.

Me, I cringe when I see or hear someone use would of instead of would have .

And for all of the fans of the English language, I present a rather long interpretation from a dead French guy;

Dearest creature in creation, Study English pronunciation.
I will teach you in my verse
Sounds like corpse, corps, horse, and worse.
I will keep you, Suzy, busy,
Make your head with heat grow dizzy.
Tear in eye, your dress will tear.
So shall I! Oh hear my prayer.
Just compare heart, beard, and heard,
Dies and diet, lord and word,
Sword and sward, retain and Britain.
(Mind the latter, how it’s written.)
Now I surely will not plague you
With such words as plaque and ague.
But be careful how you speak:
Say break and steak, but bleak and streak;
Cloven, oven, how and low,
Script, receipt, show, poem, and toe.
Hear me say, devoid of trickery,
Daughter, laughter, and Terpsichore,
Typhoid, measles, topsails, aisles,
Exiles, similes, and reviles;
Scholar, vicar, and cigar,
Solar, mica, war and far;
One, anemone, Balmoral,
Kitchen, lichen, laundry, laurel;
Gertrude, German, wind and mind,
Scene, Melpomene, mankind.
Billet does not rhyme with ballet,
Bouquet, wallet, mallet, chalet.
Blood and flood are not like food,
Nor is mould like should and would.
Viscous, viscount, load and broad,
Toward, to forward, to reward.
And your pronunciation’s OK
When you correctly say croquet,
Rounded, wounded, grieve and sieve,
Friend and fiend, alive and live.
Ivy, privy, famous; clamour
And enamour rhyme with hammer.
River, rival, tomb, bomb, comb,
Doll and roll and some and home.
Stranger does not rhyme with anger,
Neither does devour with clangour.
Souls but foul, haunt but aunt,
Font, front, wont, want, grand, and grant,
Shoes, goes, does. Now first say finger,
And then singer, ginger, linger,
Real, zeal, mauve, gauze, gouge and gauge,
Marriage, foliage, mirage, and age.
Query does not rhyme with very,
Nor does fury sound like bury.
Dost, lost, post and doth, cloth, loth.
Job, nob, bosom, transom, oath.
Though the differences seem little,
We say actual but victual.
Refer does not rhyme with deafer.
Fe0ffer does, and zephyr, heifer.
Mint, pint, senate and sedate;
Dull, bull, and George ate late.
Scenic, Arabic, Pacific,
Science, conscience, scientific.
Liberty, library, heave and heaven,
Rachel, ache, moustache, eleven.
We say hallowed, but allowed,
People, leopard, towed, but vowed.
Mark the differences, moreover,
Between mover, cover, clover;
Leeches, breeches, wise, precise,
Chalice, but police and lice;
Camel, constable, unstable,
Principle, disciple, label.
Petal, panel, and canal,
Wait, surprise, plait, promise, pal.
Worm and storm, chaise, chaos, chair,
Senator, spectator, mayor.
Tour, but our and succour, four.
Gas, alas, and Arkansas.
Sea, idea, Korea, area,
Psalm, Maria, but malaria.
Youth, south, southern, cleanse and clean.
Doctrine, turpentine, marine.
Compare alien with Italian,
Dandelion and battalion.
Sally with ally, yea, ye,
Eye, I, ay, aye, whey, and key.
Say aver, but ever, fever,
Neither, leisure, skein, deceiver.
Heron, granary, canary.
Crevice and device and aerie.
Face, but preface, not efface.
Phlegm, phlegmatic, ass, glass, bass.
Large, but target, gin, give, verging,
Ought, out, joust and scour, scourging.
Ear, but earn and wear and tear
Do not rhyme with here but ere.
Seven is right, but so is even,
Hyphen, roughen, nephew Stephen,
Monkey, donkey, Turk and jerk,
Ask, grasp, wasp, and cork and work.
Pronunciation (think of Psyche!)
Is a paling stout and spikey?
Won’t it make you lose your wits,
Writing groats and saying grits?
It’s a dark abyss or tunnel:
Strewn with stones, stowed, solace, gunwale,
Islington and Isle of Wight,
Housewife, verdict and indict.
Finally, which rhymes with enough,
Though, through, plough, or dough, or cough?
Hiccough has the sound of cup.
My advice is to [not] give up!!!

-The Chaos, by G. Nolst Trenite, aka Charivarius (1870-1946)

Nice.
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  #66  
Old 01-29-2012, 12:57 AM
jjimm jjimm is offline
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Thusly.

That's just freakin' wrong you idiot.
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  #67  
Old 01-29-2012, 01:19 AM
MsWhatsit MsWhatsit is offline
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Moist.

Never OK. Never.
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  #68  
Old 01-29-2012, 01:33 AM
Brynda Brynda is offline
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So I guess the using the phrase "moist panties" is right out, then?
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  #69  
Old 01-29-2012, 03:57 AM
Súil Dubh Súil Dubh is offline
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And what will we use to describe a towelette?!
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  #70  
Old 01-29-2012, 04:35 AM
amanset amanset is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Incubus View Post
Nice- When used to describe a person, I find 'nice' to be a very weak adjective. I guess because of the association of 'nice' guys, I find the word to be very two faced. On the surface people think "moderately good", but i've found people use nice when they cant think of anything specific about the person they like or respect. Personally I believe the significance of a compliment is based on how specific it is. describing someone as 'generous' instead of just 'nice' for example. Nice is a watered-down, lukewarm tea of a word, a cheap, uncreative wedding gift, the trophy they give the last place competitor for 'trying'.
Indeed. I had this drilled in to me by my English teacher when I was about twelve. She said that simply saying "nice" gives no other information and is too vague about the feeling it inspires. It is close to being a non-word.

Personally I hate "burglarize". Use "burgle".

"Nom" and "delish" when referring to food.
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  #71  
Old 01-29-2012, 06:42 AM
Lsura Lsura is online now
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Originally Posted by ptr2void View Post
I am very annoyed by people using the word utilize instead of use. Simply unnecessary.
Can I have your children?

(this is perhaps my biggest pet peeve related to language. I'm sure it's partly because a former workplace overused that word to a ridiculous extent. Whenever it's not used appropriately, I take it out of documents at work whenever I can.)
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  #72  
Old 01-29-2012, 06:52 AM
Mean Mr. Mustard Mean Mr. Mustard is offline
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Albeit.

It gives me the woozies.

It's a legitimate word, I know.

I still don't want you using it.


mmm

ETA: In looking it up, I just learned there is also a 'howbeit'.

Crap!

Last edited by Mean Mr. Mustard; 01-29-2012 at 06:54 AM..
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  #73  
Old 01-29-2012, 07:23 AM
Balthisar Balthisar is offline
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Originally Posted by ptr2void View Post
I am very annoyed by people using the word utilize instead of use. Simply unnecessary.
There's a place for this, really. I use a coffee cup to drink coffee. But I utilize it to hold (unshelled) eggs whilst awaiting the pan to heat.

The normal use isn't to hold unshelled eggs. It's probable and likely that both use and utilize are listed as synonyms in these modern times, but (ir)regardless of that, modern usage/utilization has kind of made them synonyms. Note: I'm against that; I prefer to distinguish as in my example, because specificity is just as important as understanding.
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  #74  
Old 01-29-2012, 08:02 AM
PookahMacPhellimey PookahMacPhellimey is offline
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Originally Posted by missred View Post
Due to.

Use because of or reword the phrase entirely. I've kicked back reports for editing that have contained due to three times in the same sentence. It drives me nuts!
Really? But are you saying there's an objective stylistic problem with it or is it your personal dislike? I mean, I can understand your example where it was used multiple times, but would you edit it when used once?

For example, I've recently had to turn down a request in an formal way and I wrote "Due to organisational issues, we are unable to fulfill your requirements". Now, to me "due to" sounds better here than "because of". Would you have advised me otherwise? I'm sincerely curious.
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  #75  
Old 01-29-2012, 08:30 AM
jjimm jjimm is offline
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Originally Posted by Balthisar View Post
There's a place for this, really. I use a coffee cup to drink coffee. But I utilize it to hold (unshelled) eggs whilst awaiting the pan to heat.
This is nonsense. You don't utilize it when you do that, you leverage its eggapacity.
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  #76  
Old 01-29-2012, 10:33 AM
Patty O'Furniture Patty O'Furniture is offline
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Originally Posted by Joey P View Post
Foot - How long is that 2X4? It's about 3 foot.
That board right there? That there's a 3 foot two-by-four if I ever done saw one.
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  #77  
Old 01-29-2012, 10:42 AM
Loach Loach is offline
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Meme. I have nothing against the concept. I just can't stand how the word sounds. No real reason for it.
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  #78  
Old 01-29-2012, 11:17 AM
missred missred is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PookahMacPhellimey View Post
Really? But are you saying there's an objective stylistic problem with it or is it your personal dislike? I mean, I can understand your example where it was used multiple times, but would you edit it when used once?

For example, I've recently had to turn down a request in an formal way and I wrote "Due to organisational issues, we are unable to fulfill your requirements". Now, to me "due to" sounds better here than "because of". Would you have advised me otherwise? I'm sincerely curious.
See post #59 for the stylistic issue.

When used correctly, I will sign a report using due to. However, the reports that I review are written in a database with limited characters and already have a heading for things like the root cause and corrective action. Due to is redundant in all cases. If nothing else, it hogs up characters that could be giving a better description of the problem.
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  #79  
Old 01-29-2012, 11:22 AM
Loach Loach is offline
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I also have to agree with those who said utilize. When every I here someone say utilize I immediately think "use".
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  #80  
Old 01-29-2012, 11:42 AM
Loach Loach is offline
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Of course I do like woody words. Hate tinny.
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  #81  
Old 01-29-2012, 01:24 PM
CheeseDonkey CheeseDonkey is offline
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"Them," as in "them is," "them are" and "them ones."

Last edited by CheeseDonkey; 01-29-2012 at 01:25 PM..
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  #82  
Old 01-29-2012, 01:28 PM
HMS Irruncible HMS Irruncible is offline
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"at this time"

is that some other time than "now"?
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  #83  
Old 01-29-2012, 01:39 PM
Ann Onimous Ann Onimous is offline
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Another one that I hear at work: "How can I help you on today?" ON today? Just "today" will do.
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  #84  
Old 01-29-2012, 01:48 PM
Trick Rider Trick Rider is offline
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Originally Posted by saje View Post


I can't abide the word "panties"' it makes me twitch even to have to write it. Ick!
Agreed. It just sounds oddly juvenile.

"Tummy" and any variation on the word "yum" really bother me for the same reason.
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  #85  
Old 01-29-2012, 01:49 PM
TreacherousCretin TreacherousCretin is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Qadgop the Mercotan View Post
I dislike orientated instead of oriented.
Yes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by saje View Post
I can't abide the word "panties"' it makes me twitch even to have to write it. Ick!
Same here! A friend of mine (female) also cringes at the word.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MsWhatsit View Post
Moist. Never OK. Never.
Yes. I hate the sound of the word, the same way I can't stand the word "toilet."

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brynda View Post
So I guess the using the phrase "moist panties" is right out, then?
Stop that!

.
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  #86  
Old 01-29-2012, 02:06 PM
TreacherousCretin TreacherousCretin is offline
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Originally Posted by Cosmic Relief View Post
"at this time" is that some other time than "now"?
I actually heard someone say "at the present moment in time" in a TV news report.

Here's another one that you hear when Cops are being interviewed on TV: "proceeded to."

As in: "I saw the burning house, so I proceeded to enter it."

You also hear it when civilian witnesses to a crime/tragedy are being interviewed by local TV reporters, and instead of just speaking in their normal voice, they try to talk like a cop. "I witnessed the altercation and proceeded to call 911."

Which reminds me of the time our local news talent referred to "the alleged suspect."

.
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  #87  
Old 01-29-2012, 02:09 PM
Jake Jones Jake Jones is offline
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Originally Posted by matt_mcl View Post
The rule I learned was that "due to" can only be used to mean "attributable to," so that you can say "the loss was due to enemy action" but not "Due to circumstances beyond our control..."

However, it's a rather fine distinction ("because of," for example, works in both contexts) and I think the battle over this one may have been lost.
I'm not seeing the distinction at all. "Attributable to circumstances beyond our control, we are announcing a 2% price increase to all products, effective immediately." It's clunky, to be sure, but is it grammatically incorrect?

Are you saying it's improper because the circumstances haven't been identified? That is a pretty fine distinction, and not one that I agree with. My personal opinion is that "due to" wins on brevity and aesthetic points, but we all have our own style. Unless I were a professional writer, I wouldn't think too highly of a manager who returned work to me for "correction" because she didn't share my stylistic preferences.

At the top of my own personal list of hated "words" is "automagically." It's not magic and your cute little made-up word doesn't add any information to the conversation, except for the fact that there's a very high likelihood that I'm not going to like you very much.
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  #88  
Old 01-29-2012, 02:25 PM
Blackberry Blackberry is offline
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Originally Posted by TreacherousCretin View Post
Here's another one that you hear when Cops are being interviewed on TV: "proceeded to."

As in: "I saw the burning house, so I proceeded to enter it."
Cops also love to say "indicate" instead of just "said". I learned in a police report writing class not to do that because it's ambiguous. You can indicate something other ways than saying it.
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  #89  
Old 01-29-2012, 03:38 PM
Namkcalb Namkcalb is offline
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Originally Posted by saje View Post
I can't abide the word "panties"' it makes me twitch even to have to write it. Ick!
Have some pity for the British, we feel the same each-and-every time you say "pants"
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  #90  
Old 01-29-2012, 03:50 PM
drewtwo99 drewtwo99 is offline
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Originally Posted by MsWhatsit View Post
Moist.

Never OK. Never.
I could really use a moist towelette right now, actually, after eating these BBQ chicken wings. (no joke, and I refuse to call them wetnaps, that sounds gross to me).
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  #91  
Old 01-29-2012, 05:33 PM
Catfood Purrito Catfood Purrito is offline
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"Chagrin." The sound of it just annoys me. Same with "schmear" referring to cream cheese on a bagel. Also, I had to stop reading Anne Rice when I noticed how often she used "preternatural." I've also ruined Anne Rice for at least two other people by pointing it out.
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  #92  
Old 01-29-2012, 05:48 PM
california jobcase california jobcase is offline
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I just heard another one- "price point."

Just when would "price" not work?
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  #93  
Old 01-29-2012, 06:18 PM
Fear Itself Fear Itself is online now
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Prolly, as in, "My head is prolly going to explode if you don't stop saying 'prolly' " Sounds like something a Brit carries in case it rains.

Hella, as in "that was a hella good movie"
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  #94  
Old 01-29-2012, 07:15 PM
Prelude to Fascination Prelude to Fascination is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CheeseDonkey View Post
"Them," as in "them is," "them are" and "them ones."
The same people who use, misuse, and abuse the above also tend to say "pitcher" instead of "picture". "I like them pitchers of yer kids!!!!!!!!!!"
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  #95  
Old 01-29-2012, 07:36 PM
Malleus, Incus, Stapes! Malleus, Incus, Stapes! is offline
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Originally Posted by Trick Rider View Post
"Tummy" and any variation on the word "yum" really bother me for the same reason.
To a degree, me also.

There should be a separate thread for "Words that are perfectly legitimate, but I hate the sound of."
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  #96  
Old 01-29-2012, 08:18 PM
colonial colonial is offline
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Originally Posted by ptr2void View Post
I am very annoyed by people using the word utilize instead of use. Simply unnecessary.
Right you are!

Another word in the same category is additionally which completely drove "also"
from the field of business language where I worked for ~20years. Wikipedia editors
are also fond of the goddam thing.
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  #97  
Old 01-29-2012, 08:21 PM
etv78 etv78 is offline
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Originally Posted by california jobcase View Post
I just heard another one- "price point."

Just when would "price" not work?
The specific price range where someone is willing to buy a produt/a company can make a reasonable profit.
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  #98  
Old 01-29-2012, 08:23 PM
colonial colonial is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Balthisar View Post
There's a place for this, really. I use a coffee cup to drink coffee. But I utilize it to hold (unshelled) eggs whilst awaiting the pan to heat.

The normal use isn't to hold unshelled eggs. It's probable and likely that both use and utilize are listed as synonyms in these modern times, but (ir)regardless of that, modern usage/utilization has kind of made them synonyms. Note: I'm against that; I prefer to distinguish as in my example, because specificity is just as important as understanding.
Baloney. Or to be less nice about it, bullshit.

"Use" works just as well in both senses above, and the distinction is so small
that employing a different word adds nothing and clarifies nothing.
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  #99  
Old 01-29-2012, 09:26 PM
california jobcase california jobcase is offline
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etv78-

What? Lost you after buy-

Also, how can a point be a range?
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  #100  
Old 01-29-2012, 09:53 PM
Patty O'Furniture Patty O'Furniture is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by etv78 View Post
The specific price range...
'Specific range' seems like an oxymoron to me.
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