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  #1  
Old 04-13-2012, 07:37 PM
sorasan sorasan is offline
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Herpes (HSV) Cure?

I have been reading up on the Herpes Simplex Virus and became curious as to why no cure has ever been developed. The best explanation I could find was:

"Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infects epithelial cells (skin cells) and
replicate in them quite rapidly but the immune system fights off the
infection in about two weeks because the replication is high and that HSV
does not "hide" in skin cells. During the first infection, however, some
viruses also infect sensitive nerves near the site of infection and are
transported along the axons to the neuron itself where it enters a latent
stage. During this time, the virus' DNA is circular and the virus does not
express any of its proteins, which makes it "invisible" to the immune
system.

Following reactivation of the latent virus after, for example, exposure to
cold, UV light, stress, or if the patient becomes immunocompromised, the
virus migrate again towards the epithelium along the axons to infect
epithelial cells and cause lesions."
-http://wiki.answers.com/Q/Why_is_herpes_incurable

So it is my understanding - and please correct me if I'm wrong; the reason there is no cure is because the virus is able to hide from the body's immune system by not expressing any of its proteins during its latent stage.

My question is instead of trying to develop medicines or cures to beat the virus, would it be at all viable to either:
- tack a protein strand on to the virus so the body could recognize it and destroy it,
- or induce something to the body that would aggrivate/activate the virus long enough for the body to take care of it?

As my background is not in medicine I would like to hear from anyone who could enlighten a curious individual.
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  #2  
Old 04-14-2012, 09:41 AM
Anaglyph Anaglyph is offline
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During this latent phase, the virus is present as a piece of DNA within a nerve cell. Normally, cells infected by viruses present viral antigens (peptides derived from viral protein) on the cell surface. These allow T-cells to recognize cells infected by viruses, and kill those cells. Nerve cells do not express the class I MHC molecules needed to display the viral antigens. Therefore viruses hidden in nerve cells are hidden from the immune system.

(Neurons, unlike glia and most other cell types, fail to express major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules, even in response to IFNγ. Journal of Neuroimmunology
Volume 123, Issues 1–2, February 2002, Pages 35–40)
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  #3  
Old 04-15-2012, 12:11 AM
phouka phouka is offline
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The problem is that nerve cells serve as a reservoir for the virus. Even if you could attach a marker of some sort that would allow the immune system to attack the virus where it survives in latent stage, that would mean coaching the immune system to attack nerve cells. Nerve cells don't regenerate like epithelial cells or other tissues, so in destroying virus infected cells, you would permanently damage nerves.

The neuralgia that often accompanies herpetic outbreaks is bad enough. Start killing nerve cells - which will cause widespread nerve inflammation - and you can count on that neuralgia being significantly worse, and it won't stop when the virus is cleared.
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  #4  
Old 04-15-2012, 12:43 AM
Chronos Chronos is offline
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Almost no viral diseases can be cured. In some cases you can treat the symptoms, or help the immune system fight them off a little more effectively, and you can sometimes vaccinate against a disease to protect you before you catch it, but a cure (something that makes the disease go away after you already have it) is a different matter.
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  #5  
Old 04-15-2012, 06:39 PM
Smeghead Smeghead is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sorasan View Post
My question is instead of trying to develop medicines or cures to beat the virus, would it be at all viable to either:
- tack a protein strand on to the virus so the body could recognize it and destroy it,
A lot of good points have been made, and there are a lot of other criticisms that could be raised, but I only have the time and energy for - and, frankly, am sufficiently perplexed by - this one.

How, exactly, do you propose to "tack a protein strand onto the virus"? Don't get me wrong, this is easily done in the lab, but what are you envisioning? Would an infected person show up to the doctor and have all of his viruses extracted, modified, and reinjected for the body to take care of? If we had the ability to extract all of the virus, that would kind of take care of the problem. No need to modify or reinject.

Or are you thinking that we would make a modified version of the virus and release it into the world to outcompete the regular version? Because then you're setting up a case of natural selection, with two competing viruses. One virus is easily found and cleared by the immune system, and the other one isn't. I'll let you figure out what would happen from there. HINT: it's not the eradication of the "difficult to kill" version.

The only other thing I can think of is that the added "protein strand" would act as some sort of vaccine, but then you're vaccinating against an epitope that doesn't exist on the native virus.

I genuinely can't figure out what you're proposing here, and I'm working on a PhD in biology at the moment.
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  #6  
Old 04-15-2012, 07:45 PM
Askance Askance is offline
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I though he was suggesting injecting something into the patient that would attach itself to the virus to make it easier for a subsequent treatment to find.

Trouble is, if you could do that then you could skip that stage and just make the treatment find and attach to the virus in the first place, using the same technique that you are proposing for the marker. That is, as the OP acknowledges the virus is effectively invisible, and that's just as true for whatever marker you want to use as for the treatment.
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  #7  
Old 04-15-2012, 08:06 PM
lazybratsche lazybratsche is offline
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Plus it's essentially the same as what our immune system already does. B cells create antibodies, which are proteins that stick to some specific bit of a pathogen. The antibodies flag the pathogen for recognition by other parts of the immune system. Antibodies are "designed" through a sort of evolutionary process that's far better than any protein design that scientists can do. There are some antibody-based drugs, but those all are modified versions of antibodies originally "designed" by an immune system.

Last edited by lazybratsche; 04-15-2012 at 08:07 PM..
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  #8  
Old 04-15-2012, 08:11 PM
zoid zoid is online now
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So if the virus hides in nerve cells when it’s dormant is it correct to say that viruses do no damage to the nerve cells themselves?

If this is true then won’t the T-cells recognize the virus infected cells as soon as the virus becomes active and suppress the spread? It seems that while you’re not “cured” the T-cells would keep the virus in check. What am I missing (sorry I failed biology in high school )?
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  #9  
Old 04-15-2012, 08:31 PM
KarlGrenze KarlGrenze is offline
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Originally Posted by zoid View Post
If this is true then won’t the T-cells recognize the virus infected cells as soon as the virus becomes active and suppress the spread? It seems that while you’re not “cured” the T-cells would keep the virus in check. What am I missing (sorry I failed biology in high school )?
That's what they do, that's why you have the manifestations when the virus reactivates. But the virus then goes back to stealth hiding mode, and becomes undetected again.
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  #10  
Old 04-15-2012, 08:36 PM
zoid zoid is online now
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So then how does something like HIV kill you if every time the virus activates the T-Cells keep it in check? I guess that's really what I'm asking.
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  #11  
Old 04-15-2012, 08:52 PM
KarlGrenze KarlGrenze is offline
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HIV is not the same virus as HSV (not even in the same virus family). Some viruses can indeed be cleared by the immune system, they don't linger on and on and on. And viruses have a lot of ways of making more copies of themselves (insert into host DNA or not, some don't even need DNA, some sometimes may recombine with host DNA some don't mix, etc.).

HIV (a retrovirus) is a problem precisely because it replicates and "lives" in T cells (T lymphocytes). It targets those cells. If the cells in your immune system are screwed up, you have problems.

With HSV (a herpes virus), when it comes out of the latent stage and start producing antigen that is recognized by the body, it is attacked. But it goes back to hiding and stealth mode (in cells that are not involved in the immune system).
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  #12  
Old 04-15-2012, 09:24 PM
zoid zoid is online now
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Great explanation - thanks!
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  #13  
Old 04-15-2012, 10:21 PM
Amblydoper Amblydoper is offline
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This is a great thread! I suffer from time to time from herpes, so I am interested in this topic.

Here is an idea, would this be effective? Since we can't kill the virus, is it possible to force it to stay in hiding? Could there be some kind of treatment to prevent the virus from reactivating, thus rendering it useless?
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  #14  
Old 04-16-2012, 07:39 AM
Qadgop the Mercotan Qadgop the Mercotan is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Amblydoper View Post
Here is an idea, would this be effective? Since we can't kill the virus, is it possible to force it to stay in hiding? Could there be some kind of treatment to prevent the virus from reactivating, thus rendering it useless?
That's essentially what maintenance treatments with antivirals like acyclovir or valacyclovir try to do. Permanently suppress the viral expression.
Quote:
Studies have demonstrated that approximately half of patients on suppressive therapy remain recurrence-free and other patients have a significant reduction in frequency of recurrences (70 to 80 percent) [9,37]. Chronic suppressive therapy is usually offered to patients who experience six or more clinical episodes per year or who experience significant anxiety or distress related to their clinical recurrences
From UpToDate.com, a subscription medical website.

The treatment of herpes simplex infections: an evidence-based review.AUCernik C, Gallina K, Brodell RTSOArch Intern Med. 2008;168(11):1137.

Valaciclovir for the suppression of recurrent genital herpes simplex virus infection: a large-scale dose range-finding study. International Valaciclovir HSV Study Group.AUReitano M, Tyring S, Lang W, Thoming C, Worm AM, Borelli S, Chambers LO, Robinson JM, Corey LSOJ Infect Dis. 1998;178(3):603.

Last edited by Qadgop the Mercotan; 04-16-2012 at 07:40 AM..
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  #15  
Old 04-16-2012, 10:44 AM
purplehorseshoe purplehorseshoe is offline
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Sorry if this is a hijack, but a light bulb went off when I read about the connection between viruses and nerve cells:

Is this why getting chickenpox as a child can manifest itself as shingles during old age? Is the pain of shingles the result of latent chickenpox viruses re-emerging from hiding in nerve cells?
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  #16  
Old 04-16-2012, 01:11 PM
KarlGrenze KarlGrenze is offline
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Originally Posted by purplehorseshoe View Post
Sorry if this is a hijack, but a light bulb went off when I read about the connection between viruses and nerve cells:

Is this why getting chickenpox as a child can manifest itself as shingles during old age? Is the pain of shingles the result of latent chickenpox viruses re-emerging from hiding in nerve cells?
Yes, shingles is the re-emergence of the chickenpox virus (despite its name, it is a herpesvirus, not a poxvirus).
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  #17  
Old 04-16-2012, 09:58 PM
Elendil's Heir Elendil's Heir is offline
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I use prescription Valtrex for my occasional cold sore eruptions, and it's worked wonders for me.

I wonder if, someday, Borg-style nanobots could be programmed to destroy HSV wherever they find it in you?
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  #18  
Old 04-17-2012, 08:18 PM
phouka phouka is offline
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Originally Posted by zoid View Post
So if the virus hides in nerve cells when it’s dormant is it correct to say that viruses do no damage to the nerve cells themselves?

If this is true then won’t the T-cells recognize the virus infected cells as soon as the virus becomes active and suppress the spread? It seems that while you’re not “cured” the T-cells would keep the virus in check. What am I missing (sorry I failed biology in high school )?
This is extremely generalized, so take it for what it's worth:

HSV does not damage nerve cells during its latent stage. When it emerges, there is at least some inflammation of the involved nerve cells (specifically, the nerve ganglia near the base of the spine), which can cause neuralgia (nerve pain) during an outbreak. Inflammation, however, is caused by the immune system and not by the virus.

Eventually the immune system picks up on the outbreak, issues antibodies, killer T cells, cytokines, and all the other good stuff, and - for most people - kills off the active virus, leaving only the latent. However, herpes is infamous for flaring during times of physical and emotional stress. During stress, the body releases cortisone, cortisol, and related hormones which suppress the immune system in order to allow the body to focus its resources on whatever the stressor is. That immune suppression allows the virus to "play while the cat's away". If the immune system is occupied with a different infection - like a rhino- or adenovirus - HSV can also take the opportunity. It's why oral herpes sores are often called "cold sores".

And you want to know something creepy? There's more and more discussion about how infectious agents - virus, bacteria, protozoa, fungal, parasitic - can alter its hosts behavior. Rats infected with toxoplasosis show unusually risky behavior that often results in being eaten by cats - which then, in turn become infected. There's a specific fungus which, when it infects an ant, causes it to leave its hive, climb up to a high point, and die - allowing the fungus to produce a fruiting body and spread its spores far and wide. You think humans are immune from this? Many people with herpes report feeling more interested in sex shortly before and even during an outbreak - the period when they are most likely to infect another person.
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  #19  
Old 07-05-2012, 02:04 PM
heyheyhey06 heyheyhey06 is offline
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Is anyone familiar with the cullen lab website. In their FAQ section, they make it sound fairly promising that a cure may be possible. They seem to be leading the research on this topic so it seems legitimate to me. Any comments on this? Is it all just wishful thinking? Is it worth donating a sum of money?
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  #20  
Old 07-05-2012, 03:23 PM
lazybratsche lazybratsche is offline
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Huh. I googled the Cullen lab, and at first glance they seem to be an entirely respectable academic research group. They do mostly basic research, and it seems that they found something promising and are soliciting private donations to fund preclinical research . That's an extremely... unusual practice in academic research, and frankly it smacks of desperation. That tells me that they can't convince grant reviewers (i.e. other scientists in their field) or anyone in private industry that their work is worth funding. And that's not a good sign.

I'm not a virologist , so I can't speak directly to their work. In general though, "Promising New Treatments!" are almost literally a dime a dozen. Many basic researchers will stumble across something that has a bit of potential for treating some disease. Some will do an experiment or two to demonstrate the clinical potential, usually by treating mice in small numbers. That's where it seems the Cullen lab is. But the vast majority of little academic "pre-clinical" trials lead nowhere, even if they seem immensely promising and fool-proof from the start.

The biotech/pharmaceutical industry funds much of the research at this level. From a financial perspective, research makes for an extremely high-risk investment. I'd ballpark the odds at 1/1000 -- as a crude rule of thumb, 1 in 10 treatments will fail at every stage of development (basic research -> pre-clinical development -> stage 1-3 clinical trials).

If you want, you can give money and know it'll end up paying for this lab's research. But keep expectations realistic! You're not funding a cure. You're funding early research that has a one in a thousand shot at leading anywhere.

Last edited by lazybratsche; 07-05-2012 at 03:25 PM..
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Old 07-05-2012, 03:40 PM
heyheyhey06 heyheyhey06 is offline
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That makes sense. Thanks for the reply. Isn't it the case though that any kind of virus is going to be looked at skeptically as it pertains to research and development, especially herpes? I can't imagine Dr. Cullen is making claim of progression without anything to back it up. Or maybe he is.

From the Cullen lab website:

"2) Have you developed a new treatment for cold sores?

The work we have performed provides a basis for the development of anti-HSV-1 and anti-HSV-2 drugs that might be able to permanently clear these viruses from patients."

This is a pretty bold statement, no?

Last edited by heyheyhey06; 07-05-2012 at 03:43 PM..
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  #22  
Old 07-05-2012, 03:58 PM
Chimera Chimera is online now
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Originally Posted by Elendil's Heir View Post
I wonder if, someday, Borg-style nanobots could be programmed to destroy HSV wherever they find it in you?
Side effects may include;

Hive Mind
constipation
headache
flatulence
loss of life
changes in vision
Lack of emotion
Sudden eruption of hardware from the face and arms
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  #23  
Old 07-05-2012, 04:04 PM
lazybratsche lazybratsche is offline
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Such statements are practically boilerplate, and really don't say much. Let's parse it carefully. "The work we have performed provides a basis for the development of anti-HSV-1 and anti-HSV-2 drugs." OK, the lab has done a considerable amount of basic research, and they have a pretty solid publication record. Any basic disease research that adds to scientific knowledge can "provide a basis for the development of drugs". Then, they say their entirely hypothetical drugs "might be able to permanently clear these viruses from patients" (bolding mine). No promises there. The "permanent" bit is intriguing, though without further reading I can't evaluate that specifically.

Any lab that does basic research relating to human diseases can honestly make a similar statement.
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Old 07-05-2012, 04:40 PM
barbitu8 barbitu8 is offline
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Originally Posted by Elendil's Heir View Post
I use prescription Valtrex for my occasional cold sore eruptions, and it's worked wonders for me.

I wonder if, someday, Borg-style nanobots could be programmed to destroy HSV wherever they find it in you?
Treatments I have found that work well to quiet an eruption are acyclovir (a prescription), hydrocortisone cream (a topical OTC at 1% or less solution), and Curasore (OTC, the cheapest but one of the best. It con tains ether in solution.) A few years ago I took part in a clinical study concerning a new tx for "cold" sores. I took either hydrocortisone, acyclovir, a new medicine, a combination of medicines, or a placebo). I had to report the stages of the sore once tx began. It took only a few days for the sore to completely disappear. I was never told what I applied, but I suspect it was hydrocortisone, as I get similar results with that. Once I was enthralled with Curasore,but It tends to leave a very dried up area for a while, and hydrocortisone is as cheap. Acyclovir, which I once took (with a prescription from a dentist) was no better and much more expensive.
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Old 07-05-2012, 05:58 PM
heyheyhey06 heyheyhey06 is offline
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Yea, I definitely see the generality of that statement regarding a permanent cure. I would just hope that a doctor with integrity wouldn't just dangle that out there to solicite money.

The optimistic side of me says there is hope based on how fast we advance scientifically these days. I'm not sure what the realistic side of me says just yet.

Last edited by heyheyhey06; 07-05-2012 at 06:02 PM..
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  #26  
Old 07-05-2012, 10:04 PM
heyheyhey06 heyheyhey06 is offline
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Also, whatever happened to this vaccine back in 2006

http://articles.latimes.com/2006/aug...th/he-herpes14
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  #27  
Old 07-05-2012, 11:23 PM
phouka phouka is offline
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Originally Posted by barbitu8 View Post
Treatments I have found that work well to quiet an eruption are acyclovir (a prescription), hydrocortisone cream (a topical OTC at 1% or less solution) . . .
Um, hydrocortisone is an immunosuppresant. That is, it shuts down the immune system. It's used topically to decrease itching and swelling from bug bites, rashes, and other skin conditions. Itching and swelling are immune system reactions to proteins like mosquito saliva, urushiol (the stuff that makes poison ivy poison), and atopic eczema (which is an autoimmune disease).

You're actually helping the herpes virus when you put hydrocortisone on an outbreak.
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Old 07-06-2012, 02:04 AM
si_blakely si_blakely is online now
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Most effective antivirals are some sort of nucleotide analogue - molecules that look (chemically) like one of the nucleotides that make up DNA (or the RNA analogues) but block DNA replication by not allowing chaining by viral DNA/RNA polymerase.

They work by stopping viral DNA replication, so replication is interfered with. However, to be effective, the virus has to be replicating. For HSV, during the latent phase, there is little viral replication and drugs like acyclovir have no impact. Some people with compromised immune systems or a continual cycle of HSV outbreaks are given ongoing Acyclovir treatment to catch the virus at the stage where it becomes active.

Also, the particular nucleotide analogue/enzyme target is important, too. I take a daily antiviral for a chronic Hepatitis B infection (a reverse transcriptase inhibitor, the same as used to treat HIV). It has no impact on HSV (or rhinoviruses, sadly).

Si
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Old 07-06-2012, 04:10 AM
barbitu8 barbitu8 is offline
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Um, hydrocortisone is an immunosuppresant. That is, it shuts down the immune system. It's used topically to decrease itching and swelling from bug bites, rashes, and other skin conditions. Itching and swelling are immune system reactions to proteins like mosquito saliva, urushiol (the stuff that makes poison ivy poison), and atopic eczema (which is an autoimmune disease).

You're actually helping the herpes virus when you put hydrocortisone on an outbreak.
Cortisone is an anti-inflammatory. True that it is an immunosuppressant, but the little I use does not significantly interfere with the immune system. It does, however, stop the inflammation. I did read years ago that it was contraindicatory for cold sores (probably for that reason), but I find it is very effective for cold sores. (Hydrocortisone was one of the treatments in the clinical study in which I participated in.)

Curasore contains ether which kills the virus, but topically it kills only the surface and near the skin virus; wheras, acyclovir attacks the virus more deeply. Symptomatically, in my experience, they're about equal.
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Old 07-06-2012, 03:06 PM
dolphinboy dolphinboy is offline
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Originally Posted by KarlGrenze View Post
That's what they do, that's why you have the manifestations when the virus reactivates. But the virus then goes back to stealth hiding mode, and becomes undetected again.
That's why my Bell's Palsy errupts every 5 years or so... and there is no cure.
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Old 07-06-2012, 11:03 PM
Elendil's Heir Elendil's Heir is offline
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Side effects may include;

Hive Mind
constipation
headache
flatulence
loss of life
changes in vision
Lack of emotion
Sudden eruption of hardware from the face and arms
Well, sure, at first - but they'd work out the bugs before human testing, right...?

RIGHT?!?!?!?
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Old 08-20-2012, 12:52 PM
ivory ivory is offline
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Chinese scientists at Florida university cured hepatitis C infections in mices and cell cultures completely. They're using rna interference technology, wich is, -by my opinion- the only possible cure for herpes. It doesn't attack cells, it attacks and destroys mRNA, used to reproduce viral proteins in cells. It is called nanozime.
This is a fairly new technology, (the mRNA interference phenomenon was firs observed in the 90's in petunias) and it can be very dangerous, but there was no side effects or any kind of immune response to the drug in the research subjects. Even if it takes years to perfect this kind of drugs, I strongly belive that this is the most promising stuff that will help people fight against viruses in the near future.
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Old 08-20-2012, 01:08 PM
Ferret Herder Ferret Herder is offline
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Chinese scientists at Florida university cured hepatitis C infections in mices and cell cultures completely. They're using rna interference technology, wich is, -by my opinion- the only possible cure for herpes. It doesn't attack cells, it attacks and destroys mRNA, used to reproduce viral proteins in cells. It is called nanozime.
This is a fairly new technology, (the mRNA interference phenomenon was firs observed in the 90's in petunias) and it can be very dangerous, but there was no side effects or any kind of immune response to the drug in the research subjects. Even if it takes years to perfect this kind of drugs, I strongly belive that this is the most promising stuff that will help people fight against viruses in the near future.
"Nanozime" should be "nanozyme," for anyone trying to find information on this. And on that note, I found the study in question, performed at the University of Florida.

Saying it had no side effects in the "research subjects" is not an accurate statement, though, as it was tested in cultured human and mouse cells, not in living subjects, as far as I can tell. It is way too early to be confidently predicting this will destroy hep C in a living human subject reliably, much less extrapolating to the rather different herpes virus.

Last edited by Ferret Herder; 08-20-2012 at 01:09 PM..
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  #34  
Old 08-20-2012, 04:19 PM
Qadgop the Mercotan Qadgop the Mercotan is online now
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We currently get cure rates in humans of about 40% to 80% with a variety of treatments at present, combinations of ribavirin, pegylated interferon, and (for genotype 1 viral infections) a protease inhibitor like teleprevir or ritonavir.

Hepatitis C is the only virus in humans that we are presently able to actually cure, or eradicate from the body.
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Old 04-20-2013, 06:45 AM
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Old 04-20-2013, 10:07 AM
USCDiver USCDiver is offline
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Heh, was there a spam post that got deleted or are you snarking on an old thread?
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Old 04-20-2013, 11:48 AM
Qadgop the Mercotan Qadgop the Mercotan is online now
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Heh, was there a spam post that got deleted or are you snarking on an old thread?
Spam got deleted.
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  #38  
Old 04-20-2013, 06:10 PM
Smeghead Smeghead is offline
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Spam, or the startling revelation that herpes infection can be permanently cured by taking the right cocktail of herbs, depending on your point of view.
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  #39  
Old 04-21-2013, 12:24 AM
SanDiegoTim SanDiegoTim is offline
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Has everyone stopped looking for a cure?
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  #40  
Old 04-21-2013, 07:43 AM
Smeghead Smeghead is offline
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Of course not. But as has been explained throughout this thread, a cure is a very difficult thing, because for long periods of time, the virus exists only as a stretch of DNA in the genome of your nerve cells. We don't have anywhere near the technology required to go into your cells and selectively remove and destroy a specific sequence of DNA. The best we can do is try to squash outbreaks of the virus when it's actively reproducing. And that's what all the anti-herpes drugs out there do.
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  #41  
Old 04-21-2013, 01:21 PM
Chronos Chronos is offline
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Besides which, if we ever do find a cure (or even a promising avenue towards a cure) for retroviruses, herpes would be a relatively low-priority target for it. Herpes is rather annoying, but HIV, for instance, kills.
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  #42  
Old 04-21-2013, 04:56 PM
Esco Esco is offline
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There is a natural cure available online which I tried and which worked well for a cold sore I had on my lip.

But I dont think I'm allowed to post the manufacturer, so maybe you wanna PM me.
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  #43  
Old 04-21-2013, 09:20 PM
Smeghead Smeghead is offline
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I refer you to post #35.
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  #44  
Old 04-23-2013, 02:45 PM
Esco Esco is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Smeghead View Post
I refer you to post #35.
I wouldnt have believed if my tests hadnt come back negative either
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  #45  
Old 04-23-2013, 03:02 PM
Qadgop the Mercotan Qadgop the Mercotan is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Esco View Post
I wouldnt have believed if my tests hadnt come back negative either
Of course your tests will come back negative for the virus once the current lesion has healed sufficiently. It doesn't take any medication or treatment to make that happen. That's the natural course of the disease.

And your blood will most likely remain positive for the herpes virus antibody for the rest of your life, no matter what sorts of treatment you do take or don't take. But 10-15% of folks do have their antibodies become undetectable eventually, again regardless of any or no treatment.

Last edited by Qadgop the Mercotan; 04-23-2013 at 03:03 PM..
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  #46  
Old 04-23-2013, 04:37 PM
USCDiver USCDiver is offline
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But, Qadgop, he said it was natural!!

Esco, you can PM me the name of the manufacturer, I'm not scared to post it here for everyone to evaluate. I'm sure the cure will stand up to the scrutiny of a couple of internet message board folks.
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  #47  
Old 04-24-2013, 11:18 AM
Esco Esco is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Qadgop the Mercotan View Post
Of course your tests will come back negative for the virus once the current lesion has healed sufficiently
Nope, thats not true. Herpes virus is still detectable by blood tests even when it lays dormant

Quote:
Originally Posted by Qadgop the Mercotan View Post
That's the natural course of the disease
No, it isnt

Quote:
Originally Posted by Qadgop the Mercotan View Post
And your blood will most likely remain positive for the herpes virus antibody for the rest of your life, no matter what sorts of treatment you do take or don't take.
Thats the only part of your post thats true.

Please dont seek a career in the medical field





.

Last edited by Esco; 04-24-2013 at 11:20 AM..
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  #48  
Old 04-24-2013, 11:21 AM
USCDiver USCDiver is offline
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Originally Posted by Esco View Post

Please dont seek a career in the medical field
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  #49  
Old 04-24-2013, 11:35 AM
Darth Panda Darth Panda is offline
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Originally Posted by SanDiegoTim View Post
Has everyone stopped looking for a cure?
I have. I can confirm that years of heavy drinking don't cure it, but frequency of occurence has gone way down. I feel like it's been at least 2 years.
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  #50  
Old 04-24-2013, 11:39 AM
Smeghead Smeghead is offline
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Oh, Esco. Lest you continue to make an ass of yourself, you should know that our good Qadgop is a practicing physician, and has been for decades, and knows more about herpes than anyone should have to.
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