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  #1  
Old 04-26-2012, 05:50 PM
Mewl Dear Mewl Dear is offline
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Bob Ross

I assume that if you opened this thread you know who he is/was.
Has anyone seen or owned one of his paintings?
Are they worth anything?
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  #2  
Old 04-26-2012, 05:54 PM
RealityChuck RealityChuck is offline
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Never saw his paintings. I was more of a Jon Gnagy man, though.
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  #3  
Old 04-26-2012, 06:15 PM
panache45 panache45 is offline
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I'd be damn surprised if his paintings are worth more than the faux-canvas they're painted on.
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Old 04-26-2012, 06:15 PM
Alice The Goon Alice The Goon is offline
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But they are happy little paintings.
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Old 04-26-2012, 06:21 PM
drastic_quench drastic_quench is offline
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Ebay asks around three grand, but who buys?
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Old 04-26-2012, 06:23 PM
appleciders appleciders is offline
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I can't get a good answer from a couple minutes of Googling, but I'm seeing references to prices from a couple hundred dollars to a couple thousand, never more than eight or nine thousand. I'd be very leery of buying an original piece of art on eBay, since it'd be very hard to verify its authenticity. Apparently he donated dozens or hundreds of paintings to PBS fundraisers to be auctioned off.

That seems a little high to me, given that they're not terribly important, original, or rare, but I guess the kitsch factor and Bob's own celebrity push the prices up. Probably the price has more to do with owning a piece from his iconic* TV show more than the intrinsic quality of the art. I'd bet on their prices declining over the next twenty or thirty years as Ross fades from the public consciousness, and the sheer number of them gluts the market.

*For very loose usages of the word "iconic".

Last edited by appleciders; 04-26-2012 at 06:26 PM..
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  #7  
Old 04-26-2012, 06:26 PM
Ibanez Ibanez is offline
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I paint oils, I went through a Bob Ross phase and churned out some his landscapes paintings. His techniques are solid, which allows you to pump them out quick.

Yeah, an original Ross would be worth something for a select groupe of people, depending on the piece of course and if its authentic.
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  #8  
Old 04-27-2012, 04:08 PM
Shooby Shooby is offline
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Bob Ross always struck me as a decent, less egotistical version of Thomas Kinkade. He had one of the most soothing programs ever.
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  #9  
Old 04-27-2012, 04:16 PM
miss elizabeth miss elizabeth is offline
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I would love to own a Bob Ross painting. They are pretty and he was so kindhearted. Those paintings are a part of my childhood.
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Old 04-27-2012, 04:20 PM
Rhiannon8404 Rhiannon8404 is offline
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I loved watching his show when I was a kid. He had such a nice voice and his paintings were nice. I would have one of his paintings just for those reasons alone, but I wouldn't pay a lot for it.
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Old 04-27-2012, 06:54 PM
Lasciel Lasciel is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by miss elizabeth View Post
I would love to own a Bob Ross painting. They are pretty and he was so kindhearted. Those paintings are a part of my childhood.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rhiannon8404 View Post
I loved watching his show when I was a kid. He had such a nice voice and his paintings were nice. I would have one of his paintings just for those reasons alone, but I wouldn't pay a lot for it.
This all the way.

Between Bob Ross and Mister Rogers, that was some serious childhood relaxation. I would love to have one of his paintings, but I can't imagine spending lots of money on one - it would be more for the 'happy little trees' memory than for them being any sort of quality painting.
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Old 04-27-2012, 07:46 PM
not what you'd expect not what you'd expect is offline
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I loved his show. He made me want to learn to paint. He made it look so easy and fun.
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  #13  
Old 04-27-2012, 08:11 PM
The Hamster King The Hamster King is offline
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I never got the impression that Bob was trying to sell a lot of his own paintings. He always seemed more interested in getting other people to start painting their own.
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  #14  
Old 04-27-2012, 08:15 PM
etv78 etv78 is offline
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I LOVED Bob Ross! If I could find one, I'd by it. BTW, in the "what art would you save" thread here, I mentioned Bob Ross.
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  #15  
Old 04-27-2012, 08:47 PM
blondebear blondebear is offline
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He seems to have nice hair.
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  #16  
Old 04-27-2012, 09:18 PM
Biggirl Biggirl is offline
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I'd pay more for a Bob Ross than I'd pay for something from Big Lots or Overstocked.com. Which isn't saying much, I know.
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  #17  
Old 04-28-2012, 12:06 AM
GIGObuster GIGObuster is offline
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Fun fact: Bob Ross was a mean, screaming, drill Sargent in the Air Force, even so he already had a love for painting.

http://articles.orlandosentinel.com/...painting-pbs/2
Quote:
as a first sergeant in the Air Force, Ross' job was to, well, be mean. ''I was the guy who makes you scrub the latrine, the guy who makes you make your bed, the guy who screams at you for being late to work,'' he said. ''The job requires you to be a mean, tough person. And I was fed up with it. I promised myself that if I ever got away from it, it wasn't going to be that way any more.''

So when he retired in 1981, after 20 years in the military, he vowed never to scream again. Instead, he began teaching art for a national art-supply company. The oft-mimicked style began to form.
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  #18  
Old 04-28-2012, 08:57 AM
gwendee gwendee is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shooby View Post
Bob Ross always struck me as a decent, less egotistical version of Thomas Kinkade. He had one of the most soothing programs ever.
To me there are no similarities. Not a version of anything. The only thing Kinkade wanted to sell us was Kinkade, and the notion that that alone made his work valuable. Bob Ross was selling us the idea that we could make something perfectly pleasant, and the tools to do it. If anything, Bob Ross was the before the fact anti-Kinkade.
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  #19  
Old 04-28-2012, 09:41 AM
steronz steronz is offline
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A few months ago I got the idea to buy a Bob Ross painting, since I had such fond memories of his happy little trees. I figured he painted thousands of them, and they must be worthless, right? But I found what others found, that they sell for thousands. I guess that makes sense.

I still want one, but I need to earn some more money.
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  #20  
Old 04-28-2012, 10:03 AM
sailor.2 sailor.2 is offline
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Own one of his paintings

Just reading this and know he was nice guy.
he gave a painting to my dad years ago.
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  #21  
Old 04-28-2012, 12:47 PM
Turble Turble is offline
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One point many people seem to be missing is that you can make a Bob Ross (type) painting yourself. You really can. That was his point.

I have no art talent whatever, have trouble drawing stick figures. I decided to give his method a try. First painting was pretty bad, colors all scrambled and gooped together. Second was "Whoa! That looks like a mountain." My third Bob Ross painting is still hanging on my wall. My parents, my brother and sister, and several friends also have one of my paintings displayed. And I sold a few for $100 each.

I stopped doing the paintings when he died, but the stuff is still available for anybody who wants to give it a try. It takes longer than 30 minutes (more like a few hours), but if you just do what he says step by step you do end up with a picture that looks a whole lot like the one he painted. His techniques really work.

Last edited by Turble; 04-28-2012 at 12:48 PM..
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