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  #1  
Old 05-12-2012, 04:41 PM
Disposable Hero Disposable Hero is offline
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New Robocop movie - what would you like to see?

I was recently surprised to be informed that they are making a new Robocop movie. I recently rewatched the original and I was surprised at how well both the story and the special-effects stood up to modern standards.

Robocop was one of my favourite movies back in the day and I was wondering what people here would like to see in the new movie, I personally can't think of much I would change about the original.

The design of Robocop himself is pretty much a classic and I can't see how they could really improve on it.

I believe Robocop 2 is unfairly maligned, while not nearly of the same standard as the original it did have some interesting scenes and concepts, such as Robocop/Murphy nobly sacrificing his relationship with his wife after the realisation he could never be a husband to her.

I'm aware that the new film is apparently a reboot and not a sequel but I would appreciate it if people would not give away any (or as little) information as possible about it. I like to see any new movie knowing as little about it as possible.

This thread is about what you would like to see in the new movie, not what is in it. A discussion of the merits of the original is welcome though.
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  #2  
Old 05-12-2012, 05:32 PM
Shakes Shakes is online now
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I'd give it a go.

I disagree that there is little room for improvement on Mr. Murphy.

Also, that stop action animation may have been cool back in the 80's but that aint gonna pass these days.

I'm wondering if the reboot will keep the funny commercials bit going. I hope so.

Examples here!
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  #3  
Old 05-12-2012, 06:20 PM
stegon66 stegon66 is offline
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Also, that stop action animation may have been cool back in the 80's but that aint gonna pass these days.
Stop motion is cool!

I'm sure we'll get a hackneyed, bullet-time/CGI Robo, shooting perps to a hip hop or death metal soundtrack - but only PG-13 violence, mind you! Whatever.
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Old 05-12-2012, 06:20 PM
Larry Mudd Larry Mudd is offline
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I want to see more Ford Tauruses.
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  #5  
Old 05-12-2012, 06:43 PM
TBG TBG is offline
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I'd like to see it set in present day Detroit, instead of Detroit of the undetermined future time.

I would not like to see a major overhaul of the designs of Robocop or ED209. Maybe a little CGI embellishment so Murphy's not quite as obviously played by a man in a costume, but nothing too drastic.

Must include the line "I'd buy that for a dollar".

Keep Frank Miller far away from the script.
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  #6  
Old 05-13-2012, 05:45 AM
Slade Slade is offline
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Trouble is, I imagine they're going to make it as a generic action movie, with none of the pitch-black wit Paul Verhoeven brought to the original. It's that dark wit - plus the charm of the original stop motion - which made the first Robocop movie so enjoyable, and neither of those elements is likely survive in any remake.
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  #7  
Old 05-13-2012, 05:55 AM
GuanoLad GuanoLad is offline
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I'm going to guess they won't have a suit in any way reminiscent of the original. They'll probably go for a more android-like police officer, rather than big bulky fibreglass armour. It could effectively be a sequel rather than a reboot, exploring the more direct issue of robotizing a human, and not of the fascistic society the original was about.
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  #8  
Old 05-13-2012, 06:22 AM
Ashley Pomeroy Ashley Pomeroy is offline
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Well, the original was pretty rubbish if you approached it as a plain action movie. The plot was the standard "man survives mob attack, sets out for revenge" with the twist that he's a police officer, and the action sequences mostly involved Robocop standing still. Admittedly, most 80s action movies were like that - the whole John Woo jumping-through-the-air business hadn't taken off yet. Nonetheless it's a classic film because of the tone, the humour, the... and it was visually impressive and had a great soundtrack despite costing about twenty pence to make.

But it was the tone that set it apart. The combination of self-aware spoof, satire, and a core of sincerity. It had obviously ludicrous news bulletins, and most of the villains were cartoons. But Murphy's plight was genuinely affecting, and Paul Weller's performance was dead serious. I think Tim Burton was going for a similar tone with his Batman movie - Michael Keaton's low-key Batman was surrounded by freaks - but Robocop worked better on that level because Murphy was much more vulnerable. We got to see him blown to pieces, and even when he came back as Robocop he seemed broken (there was something child-like about Robocop, he was a goody-two-shoes who ate baby food).

And the film had a genuinely nervous feel, too. It had horrible ultraviolence punctuated by dark jokes. It felt as if an insane underground art film director had been given some money and minimal oversight and left to his own devices. I remember the director saying in the commentary that they got away with a lot because the hero was a policeman, and genuinely sympathetic; whatever he did to the villains was less than they had done to him. And if the villains wanted to kill each other, why not?

The other two Robocop films got the tone wrong. Robocop II was a non-stop bullet orgy freakshow with some cartoonish nods at sincerity, that felt as if a child had been asked to make something that was a bit like Robocop, but TO THE MAXXXXX!. I haven't seen the third film.

So, really, if the reboot's going to be any good - if it's going to be Robocop, and not The Punisher in a Metal Suit - it has to get the tone right. The combination of satire, exaggerated but genuinely horrible ultraviolence, and sincerity. Also, it has to have ED-209. And it has to be well-written. I mean, the parallels between Batman and Robocop are huge, I would be happy if they treated it as a Batman film, e.g. classy. But with ultraviolence. It always got me that the villain was called Clarence. The new film should have a villain called Florence. Or Melody.

"Are you dense? Are you retarded or something? I'm goddamn Robocop!"

I'd change the suit, though. Paul Weller always looked as if he was pouting. That might have been a Paul Weller thing. But I wondered why the villains never shot his mouth. On a story level they had to keep some of his face, so that we can relate to the character. And perhaps he had armoured teeth. I dunno. The costume in Robocop II looked a bit camper, it was light blue. And, yes, it has to have someone being liquidifed and then splatted against a car window. That was awesome. "Help meee!", SPLAT. Simultaneously horrible and funny. Like watching videos of women giving birth. Modern films seem bland in comparison.
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  #9  
Old 05-13-2012, 07:01 AM
armedmonkey armedmonkey is offline
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Originally Posted by Ashley Pomeroy View Post
and Paul Weller's performance was dead serious. <<snip>> Paul Weller always looked as if he was pouting. That might have been a Paul Weller thing.
"Peter". The man's name is Peter Weller. He was Buckaroo Banzai!

As far as what I want to see in the remake, they absolutely have to keep e209's arch nemesis: stairs. The thing's worse than a classic Dr. Who Dalek, when it comes to that.
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  #10  
Old 05-13-2012, 07:09 AM
Jonathan Chance Jonathan Chance is offline
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"Peter". The man's name is Peter Weller. He was Buckaroo Banzai!
Buckaroo Banzai didn't play LiveAid. The Style Council did. That makes them cooler.

What would I want from a Robocop reboot? A different movie, I suppose. I find the trend in reboots dismaying. But that's tilting at windmills, really.

Last edited by Jonathan Chance; 05-13-2012 at 07:09 AM..
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  #11  
Old 05-13-2012, 07:48 AM
Disposable Hero Disposable Hero is offline
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Originally Posted by Ashley Pomeroy View Post
I'd change the suit, though. Paul Weller always looked as if he was pouting. That might have been a Paul Weller thing. But I wondered why the villains never shot his mouth. On a story level they had to keep some of his face, so that we can relate to the character. And perhaps he had armoured teeth. I dunno.
Just a nitpick on an interesting post as I've heard this mentioned several times before. Its quite subtley done but I believe the movie makes clear that although Robocops face looks vulnerable its actually just as artificial as the rest of his body.

When Lewis touches his face she says his skin is cold, its just a flesh-like material over a metallic skull probably made to make him appear more appealing and humanlike to members of the public.

The idea of making the new Robocop humanlike in appearance but a machine on the inside has potential but I'm not sure how they could do the concept well. We've already seen the results of a more aggressive and robotlike 'Robocop' in the Robocop 2.0 made from the bad guy in the sequel.

Somebody above mentioned that the action scenes in the original Robocop are rather static as compared to the high-energy fight scenes in more modern films, I'd have to disagree that sort of action works fine for Robocop because he's not supposed to be agile, he's a walking human tank and designed to soak up small arms fire (although vulnerable to heavier weapons as shown).

There is a small discussion on the Robocop wikipedia page which says this wasn't the original concept but that the character was originally intended to be fast-moving and dodging attacks but this was changed due to the restrictions of the suit, personally I think they Robocop we actually got on-screen is more interesting and well-done than the earlier ideas they seemed to be going with.

Last edited by Disposable Hero; 05-13-2012 at 07:48 AM..
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  #12  
Old 05-13-2012, 09:59 AM
RickJay RickJay is offline
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It's not gonna be easy. You can go one of two ways:

1. Just make Robocop again, or

2. Try to make a movie called "Robocop" that's relevant to today.

These are subtly but importantly different concepts. It'd be easy to make Robocop again and do it fairly well, with the right writer and director.

But Robocop was made in 1986 (released in 1987) and the reason it worked as well as it did was in part because it was a response to the culture and politics of 1986. This is a time when people were shellshocked from the crime wave of the 1960s-1980s and felt helpless and angry about it. There had been, and continued to be, a wave of movies built on sadistic, fascist revenge fantasies, some good ("Lethal Weapon," "Dirty Harry") and some not so good ("Death Wish," "Cobra," and other bullshit movies.) "Robocop" worked because it was that kind of movie but at the same time was kind of a parody of those movies; the phony commercial with the product that fatally electrocutes the guy who steals your cap was both hilarious and kind of satisfying.

Today's sensibilities are a bit different. People are still wigged out by crime, to an extent disproportionate to its actual likelihood, but it's not like it was in 1986-1987. Rather than feeling helpless, people today are becoming politically separated - indeed, often physicall separated. In 1986, you were helpless against the Criminals, so you either were a victim or had a fancy car that electrocuted them. In 2012, you live in a gated community or stand your ground. The separation in 1986-1987 was between white people and their black allies, and black/Hispanic people; today there's a lot more complexity to that. Today people are less worried about street thugs - there's fewer of them - and more concenred about other types of criminals like terrorists, child abductors, online scam artists, and bankers. In order to capture the same combination of parody and heartfelt sincerity the original had, you'd have to change the story in some ways or else it'll FEEL old, no matter how it looks.

Last edited by RickJay; 05-13-2012 at 10:03 AM..
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  #13  
Old 05-13-2012, 10:13 AM
Disposable Hero Disposable Hero is offline
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Good post, and thats the part I was wondering about, Robocop is (in most people's opinions) a very good movie, and I was wondering what really they could do to improve it. Giving it a shiny new coat of paint and calling it New Robocop isn't really enough, the original still stands up today as a perfectly watchable film.

Personally I think one of the most interesting parts of the original was the dehumanisation and commercialisation of the individual, Robocop struggles to be recognised as a man and not just a machine, he is an individual with free will (once he recovers his memories) and not just 'product'. If they could explore that a little more it could be interesting.

But we still need the cool action scenes of course.

btw just something I meant to mention about Ashley Pomeroy's post earlier, I don't think I would call Robocop/Murphy childish, unless adherance to law, order, duty and other old-fashioned concepts of virtue is childish. I would agree that after his horrendous death and resurrection he was broken inside but he was still a human being who chose to serve and protect when nobody would really blame him for self-destructing or turning on his creators and thats something I think is worth exploring.

bttw I also agree that having the correct tone is very important, Robocop had the combination of serious storyline and tongue-in-cheek moments perfectly right. You can watch it as a straight sci-fi action film or as a (sometimes not so) subtle parody of those films.

I guess I have an interest in this because as a child of the 80's Robocop was one of those landmark films from that time-period.

Last edited by Disposable Hero; 05-13-2012 at 10:16 AM..
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  #14  
Old 05-13-2012, 10:33 AM
Loach Loach is offline
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The satire in the original movie played well with my just out of high school self. Now it seems ham fisted. But I still enjoy the original.
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  #15  
Old 05-13-2012, 12:56 PM
Bryan Ekers Bryan Ekers is online now
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I feel compelled to point out that a lot of the reminiscing about Robocop in this thread invokes scenes that were actually in the sequel.
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  #16  
Old 05-13-2012, 02:18 PM
It's Not Rocket Surgery! It's Not Rocket Surgery! is offline
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I think they need to lose the commercial parodies in the reboot. While those were great in the original - like mixing "Kentucky Fried Movie" into an action film - they would take me right out of a new movie.
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  #17  
Old 05-13-2012, 04:04 PM
Lumpy Lumpy is offline
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The remake would probably play up terrorism as the modern day angle: Robocop is supposed to be a prototype of a paramilitary police/soldier for occupation duty in places like Iraq and Kabul, being beta-tested in Detroit. And Murphy/Robocop eventually gets involved in stopping a false-flag terrorist action intended to create a causus belli in Iran a middle-Eastern nation.
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  #18  
Old 05-13-2012, 04:34 PM
Bryan Ekers Bryan Ekers is online now
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The remake would probably play up terrorism as the modern day angle: Robocop is supposed to be a prototype of a paramilitary police/soldier for occupation duty in places like Iraq and Kabul, being beta-tested in Detroit. And Murphy/Robocop eventually gets involved in stopping a false-flag terrorist action intended to create a causus belli in Iran a middle-Eastern nation.
And that would be a huge mistake, I figure. The Robocop premise doesn't lend itself to hamfisted moral ambiguity - that's how you end up with godawful dreck like Robocop 3. He was built to take down criminals, and all the criminals he kills in the first two movies are richly deserving.

Now, if he went into Iran a middle-Eastern nation and all the bad guys were obviously and cartoonishly evil and he massacred all of them, ending with something mildly cynical like glory-seeking American politicians rushing in afterward to plant flags and claim credit for Murphy's work... fine.
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  #19  
Old 05-13-2012, 04:41 PM
AncientHumanoid AncientHumanoid is offline
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Robot on Robot sex.
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Old 05-13-2012, 04:42 PM
Bryan Ekers Bryan Ekers is online now
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Robot on Robot sex.
Tragic ending - he's AC, she's DC.
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  #21  
Old 05-13-2012, 04:50 PM
AncientHumanoid AncientHumanoid is offline
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Tragic ending - he's AC, she's DC.
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  #22  
Old 05-13-2012, 06:10 PM
Hypno-Toad Hypno-Toad is offline
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Tragic ending - he's AC, she's DC.
Or, in a more enlightened setting, he's AC/DC.
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  #23  
Old 05-13-2012, 06:52 PM
Frodo Frodo is online now
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Or, in a more enlightened setting, he's AC/DC.
He's TNT.
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  #24  
Old 05-13-2012, 08:29 PM
Ashley Pomeroy Ashley Pomeroy is offline
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"Peter". The man's name is Peter Weller. He was Buckaroo Banzai!
Ah. That would explain why Paul Weller looked so puzzled when I asked him to sign a photograph of Robocop.

I mean, he did it. But, yes.
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  #25  
Old 05-13-2012, 11:01 PM
Boyo Jim Boyo Jim is offline
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Originally Posted by RickJay View Post
It's not gonna be easy. You can go one of two ways:

1. Just make Robocop again, or

2. Try to make a movie called "Robocop" that's relevant to today.

These are subtly but importantly different concepts. It'd be easy to make Robocop again and do it fairly well, with the right writer and director.

But Robocop was made in 1986 (released in 1987) and the reason it worked as well as it did was in part because it was a response to the culture and politics of 1986. This is a time when people were shellshocked from the crime wave of the 1960s-1980s and felt helpless and angry about it. There had been, and continued to be, a wave of movies built on sadistic, fascist revenge fantasies, some good ("Lethal Weapon," "Dirty Harry") and some not so good ("Death Wish," "Cobra," and other bullshit movies.) "Robocop" worked because it was that kind of movie but at the same time was kind of a parody of those movies; the phony commercial with the product that fatally electrocutes the guy who steals your cap was both hilarious and kind of satisfying.

Today's sensibilities are a bit different. People are still wigged out by crime, to an extent disproportionate to its actual likelihood, but it's not like it was in 1986-1987. Rather than feeling helpless, people today are becoming politically separated - indeed, often physicall separated. In 1986, you were helpless against the Criminals, so you either were a victim or had a fancy car that electrocuted them. In 2012, you live in a gated community or stand your ground. The separation in 1986-1987 was between white people and their black allies, and black/Hispanic people; today there's a lot more complexity to that. Today people are less worried about street thugs - there's fewer of them - and more concenred about other types of criminals like terrorists, child abductors, online scam artists, and bankers. In order to capture the same combination of parody and heartfelt sincerity the original had, you'd have to change the story in some ways or else it'll FEEL old, no matter how it looks.
The reboot will be called RoboMuslim. Salim is a gentle Imam in Detroit brutally hacked to pieces by a terrorist cell. After he's rebuilt, he goes undercover as a weaving machine at burka factory, where he sucks the terrorists in one by one, rips them to shreds and uses their remains to make modest garb for devout women. His reward is that hot muslim chicks, even devout ones, regularly strip down in front of him to try on their new clothes, and none of them give a second thought to the machine that seems to vibrate just a little more when they're naked.
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  #26  
Old 05-14-2012, 06:52 AM
SunSandSuffering SunSandSuffering is offline
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What I liked about Robocop was that the film presented a pretty large scale operation (the Police, OCP, Robo and the bad guy gang) and then just let them get on with it, showing it all on screen with no build-up. Eg. Security Concepts build Robo, Bam! he's on the street solving crimes right away, blowing away perps left and right. Most films before that just didn't have the budget or the direction to put a scenario together and then show the large scale results with no fuss. I think Veerhoven's Starship Troopers did it as well, just get on with it and show the explosions and killings right away.
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  #27  
Old 05-14-2012, 07:38 AM
GuanoLad GuanoLad is offline
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We're almost living in a world run by Omni-Consumer Products now. I wonder if that point is lost on modern audiences.
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  #28  
Old 05-14-2012, 07:46 AM
Scumpup Scumpup is offline
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RE: "Shoot him in the mouth"

The biologic material in Robocop was no more than a few "chunks on a coroner's table." I got the impression it didn't amount to more than (some of) Murphy's central nervous system. Everything else was metal or synthetic.
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Old 05-14-2012, 10:25 AM
Hypno-Toad Hypno-Toad is offline
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RE: "Shoot him in the mouth"

The biologic material in Robocop was no more than a few "chunks on a coroner's table." I got the impression it didn't amount to more than (some of) Murphy's central nervous system. Everything else was metal or synthetic.
He did have at least one working arm when they got him. Bob Morton specifically ordered them to remove it in favor of "full body prosthesis" right in front of Murphy's face. So I'm guessing he had at least a torso and organs. But just what "Full body prothesis" entails is not explicitly stated. My opinion is that he had his highly modified (armored) torso and central nervous system and a few artificially assisted organs. The rest was machine. After all, he had to eat baby food to keep his organics alive.
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Old 05-14-2012, 10:47 AM
SunSandSuffering SunSandSuffering is offline
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...And in the shoot-out with the cops in the OCP car park he was definitely using his arm to cover his face from bullets.
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  #31  
Old 05-14-2012, 05:57 PM
Disposable Hero Disposable Hero is offline
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...And in the shoot-out with the cops in the OCP car park he was definitely using his arm to cover his face from bullets.
I imagine his face is probably more vulnerable than the rest of him but its still not flesh and blood, and attempting to protect his face was a pitifully human gesture in what is an overall rather affecting scene.

btw apparently this is what Robocop looks like underneath:

http://fc02.deviantart.net/fs49/i/20..._by_haz999.jpg

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Old 05-14-2012, 06:32 PM
TBG TBG is offline
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Just a nitpick on an interesting post as I've heard this mentioned several times before. Its quite subtley done but I believe the movie makes clear that although Robocops face looks vulnerable its actually just as artificial as the rest of his body.

When Lewis touches his face she says his skin is cold, its just a flesh-like material over a metallic skull probably made to make him appear more appealing and humanlike to members of the public..
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Originally Posted by Disposable Hero View Post
I imagine his face is probably more vulnerable than the rest of him but its still not flesh and blood, and attempting to protect his face was a pitifully human gesture in what is an overall rather affecting scene.
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Originally Posted by Scumpup View Post
RE: "Shoot him in the mouth"

The biologic material in Robocop was no more than a few "chunks on a coroner's table." I got the impression it didn't amount to more than (some of) Murphy's central nervous system. Everything else was metal or synthetic.
If Robocop's face is artificial, why did OCP make him look like Murphy instead of random male face #42? They didn't want anyone know he was Murphy, least of all him.

It felt cold, well, maybe cyborg cops don't run as well at 98.6 and so he's kept at a cooler temp, I dunno.
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  #33  
Old 05-14-2012, 06:40 PM
Disposable Hero Disposable Hero is offline
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If Robocop's face is artificial, why did OCP make him look like Murphy instead of random male face #42? They didn't want anyone know he was Murphy, least of all him.
Good question, don't know.

But it would be equally strange to armour him up and then leave his lower face so exposed if it was really flesh and bone, one bullet and your expensive cyborg law-enforcement machine is so much scrap metal.

Actually thats an interesting 'in-world' question, what should your new robot cop look like? He needs to be human enough for the public to emphasis with, interact with and willingly take orders from but not human enough to be vulnerable otherwise whats the point. Keeping an artificial human face over an armoured humanoid chassis is a good compromise.

edited to add I imagine that sticking a human brain/mind into a non-humanoid body could in itself cause problems, the brain would be expecting two arms, two legs etc and messing with that would be difficult. Even Robocop 2.0 had a basically bipedal stance and body if I recall correctly.

Last edited by Disposable Hero; 05-14-2012 at 06:45 PM..
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  #34  
Old 05-14-2012, 07:27 PM
Blake Blake is offline
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If Robocop's face is artificial, why did OCP make him look like Murphy instead of random male face #42? They didn't want anyone know he was Murphy, least of all him.
Even with 1986 technology it was perfectly possible for a plastic surgeon to make someone's jawline and mouth unrecognisable (See also Michael Jackson). With Robocop era technology there was no need for him to look like Murphy even if if that is Murphy's actual face.

Either way you look at it, Robocop didn't need to look like Murphy because of physical limitations.

The real explanation is that he looked that way because the concept demanded it. The director needed physical continuity between Murphy and Robocop, and the face was the way to do that. Any in-universe explanation is just fanwankery.
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  #35  
Old 05-14-2012, 07:48 PM
Bryan Ekers Bryan Ekers is online now
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Heck, even the Robocop 2 prototype had a videoscreen to show a rendered version of Cain's face, complete with emotional cues to indicate his mood. Why? Why not?
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  #36  
Old 05-14-2012, 07:57 PM
cmyk cmyk is offline
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It's imperative you keep the human element in RoboCop. He's a tragic and sympathetic character, that over the course of the film begins to realize who he was before. When he was having flashbacks of his wife and son in his former life, those parts felt pretty thin and cheesy, but it still worked. I suppose a reboot could trump up that connection a bit more.

But all in all, there are so many kickass parts in the original, that if you didn't include them, it'd subtract away from the overall dark violence of the film. The scene of ED-209 malfunctioning in the OCP boardroom is a classic. It was truly horrifying and intimidating. The maiming of Murphy by Boddeicker and gang, going black, then the interspersed cuts we get as they're bringing RoboCop online from his POV. The internal rivalry within OCP between Dick and Bob, and their respective projects was interesting, and offered the movie a passive antagonist. It has a zillion little moments that all add up to something holistic.

You have to keep his prime directives, as it played right into the very end so brilliantly.

What would worry me most is loosing the iconic look of RoboCop and ED-209. The darkness mixed with humor is a fine line that I think would be difficult to pull off nowadays with the lot of directors we have.

That said, I think out of anyone working today, Whedon might be perfect to helm a reboot.
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  #37  
Old 05-14-2012, 08:39 PM
Lumpy Lumpy is offline
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Actually I always thought that they kept Murphy's original head and face, and a humanoid body because they needed to- they hadn't perfected a pure brain-in-jar cyborg yet. What they really wanted was a robot. In Robocop 2 the two failed prototypes are much more machine-like, though they still retain the skull before the lab techs are finally able to have the brain and eyes be the sole organic components.
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  #38  
Old 05-14-2012, 09:24 PM
Miller Miller is offline
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RoboCop's jaw has been at least partially replaced with metal. Check out this pic of the back of his head, where you can clearly see the synthetic hinge. (That pic appears to be fan art, but it matches up pretty well to the movie stills I could find on line.) I'm guessing that if any of his organic head is left at all, it's just the upper skull and face - the fleshy bits that are left exposed by the helmet are just skin and a thin layer of flesh over a metal mandible.
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Old 05-21-2012, 02:59 PM
Hypno-Toad Hypno-Toad is offline
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I've been looking through the imdb and elsewhere, but I can't find out the identity of a certain cast member. She was a brunette in the POV scene of Robocops creation. At a party she's drunk and gives him a silly crown and a big kiss. Who was this character and who portrayed her?
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Old 05-21-2012, 06:59 PM
Lumpy Lumpy is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hypno-Toad View Post
I've been looking through the imdb and elsewhere, but I can't find out the identity of a certain cast member. She was a brunette in the POV scene of Robocops creation. At a party she's drunk and gives him a silly crown and a big kiss. Who was this character and who portrayed her?
Was it Sage Parker? http://www.aveleyman.com/ActorCredit.aspx?ActorID=38474

Last edited by Lumpy; 05-21-2012 at 07:01 PM..
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  #41  
Old 05-21-2012, 07:12 PM
Hypno-Toad Hypno-Toad is offline
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Yup, that's her. Thanks!
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