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  #1  
Old 02-27-2016, 06:12 PM
Artemis_Tardis Artemis_Tardis is offline
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Legality of super heroes

If super heroes existed in real life - like Superman, for instance, or Deadpool (on a more exciting world)... Would it be legal for them to fight crime using all their superpowers? I am pretty sure that FAA would not be happy about a guy flying around without a super plane. And what about the legality of arresting (or killing) crooks and bad guys? Isn't that something that the Police should do?
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Old 02-27-2016, 06:17 PM
Atamasama Atamasama is offline
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Phoenix Jones hasn't gotten in too much trouble. Granted, he doesn't kill people, and he doesn't arrest them (generally he handles things until the cops arrive).
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Old 02-27-2016, 07:38 PM
robert_columbia robert_columbia is offline
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There's a legal blog dedicated to these kinds of questions. One of the famous ones is Superman's immigration status in the US - the consensus seems to be that he would fall under a clause providing US citizenship to abandoned children found in the US, unless proof of a non-US origin is shown before their 18th birthday.
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Old 02-27-2016, 08:17 PM
dougie_monty dougie_monty is offline
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In the letters page of DC comics, the editors once answered the question of Clark Kent's missing birth Certificate by mentioning adoption papers that the Kents had filled out after they found the baby who was (apparently) the only survivor when his home planet Krypton blew up.
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Old 02-27-2016, 09:54 PM
Hail Ants Hail Ants is offline
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Check out the Will Smith superhero film Handcock sometime. It posits the idea of this, holding a superhero responsible for things like vigilantism, collateral damage etc. Pretty funny movie too. It starts with the idea that because he's constantly being hounded by lawsuits and lawyers and police Handcock, the superhero, has said 'Fuck it' and no longer fights crime, he just wanders around like a drunk homeless guy!
  #6  
Old 02-27-2016, 10:44 PM
dougie_monty dougie_monty is offline
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Is that what you want?
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Old 02-27-2016, 10:48 PM
Elendil's Heir Elendil's Heir is offline
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Registering superheroes and superpowered mutants, and making them only use their superpowers with government permission or knock it off entirely, seems to be a recurring theme. See Watchmen, The Incredibles, Civil War, Hancock, X-Men, etc.
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Old 02-28-2016, 01:36 AM
Senegoid Senegoid is offline
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As far back is mid-1970's I remember seeing an issue of an Incredible Hulk comic which began with Bruce Banner aboard a boat, off-shore, hiding out from the authorities who are after his legal hide. And in the same issue, IIRC, there was a scene of Nighthawk conferring with his lawyer over legal wranglings over his right to engage in his super-hero activities.
  #9  
Old 02-28-2016, 01:43 AM
Urbanredneck Urbanredneck is offline
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Most super battles are in major cities and in reality, would kill and injure tens of thousands and cause billions of dollars in damage, I doubt anyone would want them in their city. I'd hate to live in Metropolis or Gotham City.
  #10  
Old 02-28-2016, 01:55 AM
astro astro is offline
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Most super battles are in major cities and in reality, would kill and injure tens of thousands and cause billions of dollars in damage, I doubt anyone would want them in their city. I'd hate to live in Metropolis or Gotham City.
If you took Fantastic 4 continuity seriously just based on battles fought and collateral damage to the city via supervillain antics the population of Manhattan would have been killed several times over already.

"Kingdom Come" kinda-sorta address this issue also re what you do when a population of super powered people and mutants (mostly quasi-amoral next generation kids of super heroes and super villains) starts to breed and expand.

Last edited by astro; 02-28-2016 at 01:59 AM.
  #11  
Old 02-28-2016, 08:55 AM
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Law and the multiverse is a fun read. They hit on the flight question, for example, and concludes that under current law the FAA has no authority to regulate flight if it doesn't involve a device of some sort. So Iron Man and Bat Man would have to worry about their suit and batcopter, but superman wouldn't. (This and everything else is based on US law, I don't know enough about other countries to look at that).

Generally you can use force in self defense or to stop a felony (especially murder) from being committed, so trying to stop a villain is probably OK. There's no 'only the police deal with crime' law, and the legal system actually has a lot of structure that still fits older times when most of what we consider police work was handled by private individuals. In all states there's some provision for a citizen's arrest or detention, so there's even provision for holding the criminal until the cops show up or taking him to the police station. OTOH, you run into problems if you try to keep crime fighting, since you start touching on areas that are usually regulated like running a bodyguard or PI business. And you will have a really hard time getting any petty criminals off the street, because you've likely tainted the evidence against them and might end up being treated as a police operative acting without a warrant.

Also, there's huge civil liability for damaged caused if you start getting into super-fights, and criminal liability if anyone gets hurt. If you stop the bad guy from blowing up the whole town you probably have a good argument that whatever you did was justified. But if you end up breaking a wall out of a building, smashing a dozen cars, and smashing up the display aisles in a few stores to stop a half million dollar bank robbery, there's a good argument that you acted recklessly, that society would be better off with the bank robbery than the damage you caused trying to prevent it. And you would have to come into court to argue that or end up with warrants out for failure to appear, no one just says 'he had a mask so we can't ever catch him'.

Also, realistically super powered people just wouldn't play out anything like the comic books. Keeping identities secret for anyone who doesn't switch bodies (like the hulk), shapeshift, or otherwise radically alter their appearance wouldn't work. The military have access to a lot of high-powered weaponry and the police would rapidly get that access if supers were causing lots of problems, without even looking into the various comic book tech. (For example, making a man portable laser strong enough to permanently blind most super heroes is well within today's tech). Lots of big fights with high property damage and lives lost would lead to police and/or military trying to hunt down and kill the terrorists, not a cycle of 'wait for a hero to catch him, lock him up, he escapes again, blows up a hospital, wait for a hero...'.
  #12  
Old 02-28-2016, 09:49 AM
Robot Arm Robot Arm is offline
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Originally Posted by Pantastic View Post
Generally you can use force in self defense...
Wouldn't the definition of "self defense" be up for some discussion in this context? Superman could hardly say "I blasted him with my heat vision because he was about to shoot me."
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Old 02-28-2016, 10:06 AM
Urbanredneck Urbanredneck is offline
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One time the mayor of Metropolis deputized Superman on the spot and ordered him to arrest Lex Luthor. I guess that would be legal.

I think the JLA is actually under jurisdiction of the United nations where they get funding. Plus superheroes get a salary.
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Old 02-28-2016, 10:36 AM
Tom Tildrum Tom Tildrum is offline
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Originally Posted by Hail Ants View Post
Check out the Will Smith superhero film Handcock sometime. It posits the idea of this, holding a superhero responsible for things like vigilantism, collateral damage etc. Pretty funny movie too. It starts with the idea that because he's constantly being hounded by lawsuits and lawyers and police Handcock, the superhero, has said 'Fuck it' and no longer fights crime, he just wanders around like a drunk homeless guy!
The title was "Hancock." You may be referencing a porn version.
  #15  
Old 02-28-2016, 10:41 AM
RealityChuck RealityChuck is offline
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Originally Posted by dougie_monty View Post
In the letters page of DC comics, the editors once answered the question of Clark Kent's missing birth Certificate by mentioning adoption papers that the Kents had filled out after they found the baby who was (apparently) the only survivor when his home planet Krypton blew up.
It was established in continuity: the Kent found him and gave him to the orphanage as a foundling. After a few days, they decided to official adopt him.

Clark would have been issued a birth certificate as a foundling.
  #16  
Old 02-28-2016, 10:48 AM
Finagle Finagle is offline
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There's a legal blog dedicated to these kinds of questions. One of the famous ones is Superman's immigration status in the US - the consensus seems to be that he would fall under a clause providing US citizenship to abandoned children found in the US, unless proof of a non-US origin is shown before their 18th birthday.
Wait, what? Being found in the wreckage of an alien spacecraft isn't proof of a non-US origin?
  #17  
Old 02-28-2016, 11:03 AM
dougie_monty dougie_monty is offline
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Originally Posted by RealityChuck View Post
It was established in continuity: the Kent found him and gave him to the orphanage as a foundling. After a few days, they decided to official adopt him.

Clark would have been issued a birth certificate as a foundling.
There you go.
  #18  
Old 02-28-2016, 11:03 AM
The Other Waldo Pepper The Other Waldo Pepper is offline
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Wait, what? Being found in the wreckage of an alien spacecraft isn't proof of a non-US origin?
There was a possible-future story where the Supreme Court ruled that (a) the ship was a birthing matrix for a fetus, not a rocket for an already-born infant, and so (b) Kal-El was, technically, born on US soil; Superman's presidency ensued.
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Old 02-28-2016, 01:44 PM
furryman furryman is offline
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I remember reading a short story where the guy fights crime for awhile, then is hit with a ton of law suits. He moves to a remote island to get away from it all.
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Old 02-28-2016, 03:07 PM
Mr. Miskatonic Mr. Miskatonic is offline
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There's also the Nobody Scores take on superhero consequences. Although it does not do the legal stuff.
  #21  
Old 02-28-2016, 04:56 PM
Der Trihs Der Trihs is offline
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The webcomic Grrl Power takes the sensible position that while supers can use their powers as they like so long as they don't hurt anyone, if you want to stop criminals you have to get a badge. No vigilantism. And they don't recruit people at gunpoint Marvel Registration style, they just offer supers lots and lots of money to work for them.

The lawsuit/property damage issue is touched on too some, such as in the advice on how to minimize the issue. One bit I recall offhand is the recommendation to throw bad guys into the ground, not through walls; that not only does less property damage (the earth being mostly a big ball of rock) and is much less likely to hit an innocent person, but any property that does get damaged is probably going to be government owned.
  #22  
Old 02-29-2016, 04:34 AM
Hail Ants Hail Ants is offline
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I remember reading a short story where the guy fights crime for awhile, then is hit with a ton of law suits. He moves to a remote island to get away from it all.
A really early example of this is the original King Kong sequel Son of Kong. Although it isn't a great film, kind of just a quicky-sequel, at the beginning Denham is being swamped with lawsuits over all the damage & deaths Kong caused in NYC, and flees back to Skull Island to escape them. Kind of a hip idea for such an old film.

This idea is one of the things I really liked about the first trailers for Batman v Superman. Usually once a superhero arrives it's all just happiness & peace and waving & cheering for him. I loved how they opened the sequel with the idea of everyone being incredibly suspicious of him. Who is he? What are his intentions? Where are his loyalties? And the idea that now that there's a god-like being on Earth, like it or not, absolutely everything would change. The whole notion of nation-states, militaries, religious cultures, strategic alliances, regional conflicts, everything would be effected.

And even though Man of Steel ended with him reassuring the US military that he's '...about as American as you can get', it looks as though three years later things have changed a bit. He's got his own personal squad of Praetorian Guard, S-emblazoned soldiers, and he's very arrogant and dismissive of this uppity 'bat' vigilante daring to challenge his authority.

Last edited by Hail Ants; 02-29-2016 at 04:34 AM.
  #23  
Old 02-29-2016, 06:06 AM
Urbanredneck Urbanredneck is offline
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Well unless their are obvious super villains that stand up and challenge them, I frankly think it would be hard for them to find much to do. Now the comics show police cars chasing bank robbers, or some mega plane about to crash where supes flies in and becomes an extra plane engine but such things are actually pretty rare and I doubt supes would be standing by ready to do such jobs.

So to really be effective he would have to be in tune with police radios and in such cases he would practically be a deputy because someone flying in at 200 mph and jumping into a tense crime scene would cause alot of problems.

And thats just Superman who has the ability to fly anywhere and see anything so how about lesser heroes like say Spiderman who can only go as fast as they can sling web and who might be miles away from a crime scene or burning building or even a cat who's stuck up a tree.
  #24  
Old 02-29-2016, 12:34 PM
Tom Tildrum Tom Tildrum is offline
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I remember reading a short story where the guy fights crime for awhile, then is hit with a ton of law suits. He moves to a remote island to get away from it all.
The title "Batman v. Superman" has always suggested to me that the movie is going to show them winding up in litigation.
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Old 02-29-2016, 03:29 PM
Elendil's Heir Elendil's Heir is offline
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Heh. Could be Batman ex rel. City of Gotham v. Superman ex rel. United States.
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Old 02-29-2016, 03:39 PM
Count Blucher Count Blucher is offline
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  #27  
Old 02-29-2016, 04:25 PM
Just Asking Questions Just Asking Questions is offline
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For a handful of superheroes, it really doesn't matter what the law allows. How are you going to enforce your decisions on Superman, Hancock or, to a lesser extent, the Hulk, if they don't want to listen to you?
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Old 02-29-2016, 05:22 PM
Blue Blistering Barnacle Blue Blistering Barnacle is offline
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"Remember the Keene act!"

"Spirit of '77!"
  #29  
Old 02-29-2016, 11:17 PM
chorpler chorpler is offline
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The webcomic Grrl Power takes the sensible position that while supers can use their powers as they like so long as they don't hurt anyone, if you want to stop criminals you have to get a badge. No vigilantism. And they don't recruit people at gunpoint Marvel Registration style, they just offer supers lots and lots of money to work for them.

The lawsuit/property damage issue is touched on too some, such as in the advice on how to minimize the issue. One bit I recall offhand is the recommendation to throw bad guys into the ground, not through walls; that not only does less property damage (the earth being mostly a big ball of rock) and is much less likely to hit an innocent person, but any property that does get damaged is probably going to be government owned.
Similarly, the "Super Powereds" series by Drew Hayes involves a group of college students at one of the University of California campuses, and who are also enrolled with a bunch of other students in the secret "heroing" college for "supers" (people who have superpowers they can control). A bunch of people get cut each year until only ten people graduate from each class of several hundred incoming new students. The ten who pass are legally allowed to be "heroes," which means they can fight supervillains when the need arises. Part of the hero training involves minimizing collateral damage and lawsuit/compensation potential. Non-"hero" supers are allowed to save people from attacks and disasters and clean stuff up and whatnot, but are not allowed to fight supervillains. So this group of friends has to deal with the knowledge that unless they're the absolute cream of the crop, they won't get to continue on and become heroes. (They also have a Deep Dark Secret that they have to try to keep, but that's not relevant to this discussion.)

I'm liking it quite a bit, but it's not finished yet. The books are divided by school year, similar to Harry Potter, and I think they're available to read free at the author's web site.

I will have to take a look at this "Grrl Power" webcomic. It sounds interesting.
  #30  
Old 02-29-2016, 11:30 PM
Blue Blistering Barnacle Blue Blistering Barnacle is offline
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Similarly, the "Super Powereds" series by Drew Hayes involves a group of college students at one of the University of California campuses, and who are also enrolled with a bunch of other students in the secret "heroing" college for "supers" (people who have superpowers they can control). A bunch of people get cut each year until only ten people graduate from each class of several hundred incoming new students. The ten who pass are legally allowed to be "heroes," which means they can fight supervillains when the need arises. Part of the hero training involves minimizing collateral damage and lawsuit/compensation potential. Non-"hero" supers are allowed to save people from attacks and disasters and clean stuff up and whatnot, but are not allowed to fight supervillains. So this group of friends has to deal with the knowledge that unless they're the absolute cream of the crop, they won't get to continue on and become heroes. (They also have a Deep Dark Secret that they have to try to keep, but that's not relevant to this discussion.)



I'm liking it quite a bit, but it's not finished yet. The books are divided by school year, similar to Harry Potter, and I think they're available to read free at the author's web site.



I will have to take a look at this "Grrl Power" webcomic. It sounds interesting.

Sounds a little like Magellan , a webcomic. But little emphasis on the 'legal' part, and I think they have a much better graduation rate.
  #31  
Old 03-01-2016, 02:13 AM
Lorne Armstrong Lorne Armstrong is offline
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I always wondered how Clark Kent could get a TB test being that they're required for many jobs. Obviously, the needle wouldn't pierce his skin. Also, what if he got a job that required fingerprints? Wouldn't that out him as Superman?
  #32  
Old 03-01-2016, 03:48 AM
Find Friends Find Friends is offline
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I've often wondered how involving an apparent minor, such as Robin, would actually work out. This would also apply to Green Arrow and Speedy, and any number of DC duos.

I recall reading one reprint in which Batman went from being a suspicious vigilante in the eyes of the police to accepted deputy of the law upon the recommendation of Commissioner Gordon. That's fine, but it left off answering how Robin's participation, however willing, could be legally acceptable. The term "child endangerment" comes to mind.

There was one story from the Fifties, with a splash panel showing Bruce and his ward Dick in a courtroom, being legally forced apart. There were shadowy overhead images of each in their costumed identities. But the story involved only their civilian identities. (Naturally, there was a pleasant resolution.)

We never saw any officials try to confront the Bat guy and say that they wished to speak to him about a sensitive matter.
  #33  
Old 03-01-2016, 08:53 AM
Blue Blistering Barnacle Blue Blistering Barnacle is offline
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I've often wondered how involving an apparent minor, such as Robin, would actually work out. This would also apply to Green Arrow and Speedy, and any number of DC duos.



I recall reading one reprint in which Batman went from being a suspicious vigilante in the eyes of the police to accepted deputy of the law upon the recommendation of Commissioner Gordon. That's fine, but it left off answering how Robin's participation, however willing, could be legally acceptable. The term "child endangerment" comes to mind.



There was one story from the Fifties, with a splash panel showing Bruce and his ward Dick in a courtroom, being legally forced apart. There were shadowy overhead images of each in their costumed identities. But the story involved only their civilian identities. (Naturally, there was a pleasant resolution.)



We never saw any officials try to confront the Bat guy and say that they wished to speak to him about a sensitive matter.

In "The Dark Knight Returns", Commissioner Gordon retires and his replacement makes it a priority to arrest the vigilante, Batman (who has himself come out of retirement). When he is spotted with a new " 'Boy' Wonder", the new commissioner instructs her assistant to add Child Endangerment to 'the list'.
  #34  
Old 03-02-2016, 09:18 AM
SpyOne SpyOne is offline
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I remember reading a short story where the guy fights crime for awhile, then is hit with a ton of law suits. He moves to a remote island to get away from it all.
The central character of the comic Ex Machina tried fighting crime after he got his superpowers, but shortly figured out that it just doesn't work like it does in the comics.
So, he decides to try to do some actual good in the world, and runs for mayor.

It makes for an interesting story, with most of the action set in the "present day" where he is Mayor of New York, but occasional flashbacks to stuff that happened when he was "The Great Machine".
  #35  
Old 03-02-2016, 10:02 AM
Pantastic Pantastic is offline
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How are you going to enforce your decisions on Superman,
Face it, superman's arch-nemesis is a guy who's only super power is baldness. If he wants to try to take on the entire US, the government can train thousands of bald guys in giving melodramatic speeches to utterly ruin his day.
  #36  
Old 03-02-2016, 01:05 PM
robert_columbia robert_columbia is offline
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There's a legal blog dedicated to these kinds of questions. One of the famous ones is Superman's immigration status in the US - the consensus seems to be that he would fall under a clause providing US citizenship to abandoned children found in the US, unless proof of a non-US origin is shown before their 18th birthday.

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Wait, what? Being found in the wreckage of an alien spacecraft isn't proof of a non-US origin?
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Originally Posted by RealityChuck View Post
It was established in continuity: the Kent found him and gave him to the orphanage as a foundling. After a few days, they decided to official adopt him.

Clark would have been issued a birth certificate as a foundling.
I believe the point is that proof of a non-US origin would have to be presented to authorities to the extent that an official ruling could be issued (e.g. from Family Court) before the person's 18th birthday. Otherwise, you could say that even for a mundane case of an abandoned child, some proof exists somewhere that the child was not actually born in the country where they were found, even if that proof is unavailable to authorities. The legal principle is about the fact that the child, being a person with rights and all, deserves to have a reasonably clear and secure legal status. You can't just let an innocent person spend their entire life in fear that a birth certificate will show up at age 50 and lead to their deportation to a faraway country where they don't know the language and have to rebuild their life from scratch.

Superman presumably would have been issued a "foundling" birth certificate (these do actually exist) and would have adoption papers identifying him as the new Clark Kent. If these papers were not officially overturned in the time allowed, then he is conclusively deemed a US citizen for life.

And no, being found in a crashed alien spacecraft isn't proof of a foreign origin. A human parent with US citizenship could have come across a crashed and abandoned alien spacecraft while wandering around Kansas and decided, in a fit of deviousness, to abandon their baby there.

Last edited by robert_columbia; 03-02-2016 at 01:07 PM.
  #37  
Old 03-02-2016, 01:32 PM
Atamasama Atamasama is offline
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I always wondered how Clark Kent could get a TB test being that they're required for many jobs. Obviously, the needle wouldn't pierce his skin. Also, what if he got a job that required fingerprints? Wouldn't that out him as Superman?
That was a problem on the TV show Smallville, the inability to take his blood due to needles breaking.

The fingerprint thing is an interesting question, but to do it you'd need Superman's fingerprints, and how are you going to do that, give him a cup of coffee then steal it from the wastebasket? And since Clark is such a do-gooder it's unlikely that his prints are on file.

Of course this is a reality in which people can't tell that Superman is Clark Kent without glasses on...
  #38  
Old 03-02-2016, 01:40 PM
CalMeacham CalMeacham is offline
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Originally Posted by Lorne Armstrong View Post
I always wondered how Clark Kent could get a TB test being that they're required for many jobs. Obviously, the needle wouldn't pierce his skin. Also, what if he got a job that required fingerprints? Wouldn't that out him as Superman?
Back in the Silver Age comics, Superman was able to give Lois Lane a blood transfusion (temporarily giving her super-powers) by puncturing his own skin with his fingernail.

So he'd better be careful scratching himself, or he'll end up looking like Edward Scissorhands.




(We won't discuss the fact that, not only is Lois a compatible blood type, but she can accept blood from an alien donor with a totally different ancestry. The wonders of comic-book science!)
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Old 03-02-2016, 02:10 PM
Quercus Quercus is offline
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(We won't discuss the fact that, not only is Lois a compatible blood type, but she can accept blood from an alien donor with a totally different ancestry. The wonders of comic-book science!)
Well, yeah, Krypton blood is poisonous to Lois...
unless she has super-healing, of course. And we all know that a human transfused with Krypton blood (under Earth's sun, anyway) gets super-healing power. So she would be perfectly fine.

Look, you can't argue with Science, you know.
  #40  
Old 03-02-2016, 02:16 PM
Elendil's Heir Elendil's Heir is offline
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...Of course this is a reality in which people can't tell that Superman is Clark Kent without glasses on...
Speaking of which: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Y8iRvQdSGA
  #41  
Old 03-02-2016, 02:31 PM
Find Friends Find Friends is offline
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In "The Dark Knight Returns", Commissioner Gordon retires and his replacement makes it a priority to arrest the vigilante, Batman (who has himself come out of retirement). When he is spotted with a new " 'Boy' Wonder", the new commissioner instructs her assistant to add Child Endangerment to 'the list'.
I find it hard to believe I missed that when reading the miniseries, so I suppose I must have forgotten it. Quite a time lag from the Golden Age, though.

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I always wondered how Clark Kent could get a TB test being that they're required for many jobs. Obviously, the needle wouldn't pierce his skin. Also, what if he got a job that required fingerprints? Wouldn't that out him as Superman?
There was a story titled, "Clark Kent, Bad Boy!" reprinted as a "Hall of Fame classic" in the back of Adventure Comics.

"Bad boy" was apparently the predecessor to "Juvenile Delinquent". I recall a college friend simultaneously amused and puzzled by the term.

Clark Kent had a reputation as a model student (with the possible exception of taking too many bathroom breaks and spending too much time in there... and I don't mean for that...). But suddenly he was acting up, pulling prank after prank and violating any rule he could think of. Even Lana Lang spoke darkly at him: "What a Bad Boy you've become, Clark!"

The school principal has a far less calm reaction to the shenanigans, and decided that he had to expel Clark from school for the multiple offenses.

The climax of the story came when the principal opened a case of vaccines in the presence of the Superkid. There were exactly enough of the tightly rationed vaccines to cover every student. Only one problem: One of the little tubes had been cracked open, and therefore empty.

Clark Kent had been in charge of pickup.

The principal added nothing and nothing, and seemed to get four, just as he was expected to.

"Hmm. Brave Clark..." He decided that Clark felt responsible for accidental breakage and was willing to get himself expelled so that no other student would be at risk.

Of course, that was not the real explanation for the changed behavior. In a thought-panel young Supie reflected over what would have happened if they tried to inject him. (This was no doubt before he had the idea of using his own super-hard fingernails.)

Either the count turned out to be one over the student population or Kal-El procured another vial. Or else he claimed to have one. "Don't worry about Clark," he says as he flies off...

He will administer the shot personally.

Uh huh...
  #42  
Old 03-02-2016, 02:56 PM
dougie_monty dougie_monty is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Elendil's Heir View Post
Many years ago, Mad published a "Comic Opera," with scores of well- known comic-strip characters in a musical. In a song set to the tune of "It Ain't Necessarily So," Dick Tracy sings:
Just look at that fellow, Clark Kent!
Just look at that fellow, Clark Kent!
His specs don't disguise him
And yet no one spies him
As being that Superman gent!

Last edited by dougie_monty; 03-02-2016 at 02:57 PM.
  #43  
Old 03-02-2016, 11:46 PM
Horatio Hellpop Horatio Hellpop is offline
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Within the Marvel universe, the characters all have very different relationships with law enforcement. The Punisher is likely to get arrested on sight. The Fantastic Four aren't really crime fighters so much as explorers, and they maintain a lot of licenses for stuff like the Pogo Plane (a rocket that takes off and lands from the middle of Manhattan) and the Negative Zone portal. They've been banned form the city limits several times, but keep getting invited back. The X-Men aren't exactly crime fighters either and frequently operate from hidden bases (Weapon X, Siege Perilous, Muir Island, etc), but their main school operates with the full knowledge of SHIELD and New York State; they're kind of grateful to have a place to send mutant teenagers. The Avengers are de facto government agents via S.H.I.E.L.D. At one point, the Avengers chairman was just short of being a cabinet-level position. Doom, Namor and the Inhumans have diplomatic immunity. Spider-Man has run the gamut from wanted vigilante to Avenger to S.H.I.E.L.D. contractor.

Bob Ingersoll wrote a column for many years about legal principles that might apply to comic book superheroes, for the Comics Buyer's Guide, called "The Law Is a Ass." He may still write it, I haven't seen a copy of the paper in maybe 20 years though.
  #44  
Old 03-03-2016, 12:43 AM
Urbanredneck Urbanredneck is offline
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The Netflix series about Daredevil is a continuity of the Avengers where they had the big battle and now the issue is for the contracts to rebuild the city.
  #45  
Old 03-03-2016, 12:47 AM
Urbanredneck Urbanredneck is offline
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On Superman's medical issues, I believe their is a certain doctor who specializes in treating Superman and even has some kryptonite in case he needs to temporarily get thru Supermans invulnerability when he needs to do an operation or otherwise cut into his skin.
  #46  
Old 03-03-2016, 01:39 AM
Atamasama Atamasama is offline
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Originally Posted by Urbanredneck View Post
The Netflix series about Daredevil is a continuity of the Avengers where they had the big battle and now the issue is for the contracts to rebuild the city.
I love the fact that in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, something as big as an alien invasion that destroys much of Manhattan is a big thing that everyone talks about for years and has long-term consequences. Like 9-11 did in real life. In many comic books and related TV shows something like that is practically forgotten shortly after.
  #47  
Old 03-03-2016, 06:07 AM
Urbanredneck Urbanredneck is offline
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I love the fact that in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, something as big as an alien invasion that destroys much of Manhattan is a big thing that everyone talks about for years and has long-term consequences. Like 9-11 did in real life. In many comic books and related TV shows something like that is practically forgotten shortly after.
I wonder, when they rebuild those areas, and assuming their will be another superhero fight in the future, what special adaptations would be made?

For example, I would want every building to have some sort of safe room/bomb shelter area or such that would work just like a tornado shelter but even better and provide a safe area when the building has the Hulk smashing into it.

Or even better, have an underground bunker system so to quickly move people underground to relative safety?
  #48  
Old 03-03-2016, 07:35 AM
Jim's Son Jim's Son is offline
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On the 1960s tv series "Batman" there are plenty of times when Commissioner Gordon or a member of Chief O'Hara outstanding police force will tell a concerned citizen that the Caped Crusader and the Boy Wonder are duly deputized law enforcement agents. There is even one time Batman takes Gordon to the Bat Cave (after sedating him with Bat-Gas) to make sure his questioning of a gang member is proper.
  #49  
Old 03-03-2016, 07:44 AM
The Other Waldo Pepper The Other Waldo Pepper is offline
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Originally Posted by Urbanredneck View Post
On Superman's medical issues, I believe their is a certain doctor who specializes in treating Superman and even has some kryptonite in case he needs to temporarily get thru Supermans invulnerability when he needs to do an operation or otherwise cut into his skin.
Hey, if you can't trust Doctor Holurt, then who can you trust?
  #50  
Old 03-03-2016, 08:37 AM
Haldurson Haldurson is offline
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If you haven't read George R.R. Martin's "Wild Cards" series, I strongly recommend at least the first few books in it. It's an alternate history where after WWII, some aliens unleash a virus on the world as an experiment, and it gives some people superpowers (some of those superpowers are not exactly enviable, like the woman who can turn herself into a puddle of water).

One of the main characters of the series is an alien named Dr. Tachyon who can read minds and mind-control people. He arrives in a space ship to try to warn U.S. leaders about the virus (obviously, he fails, or there wouldn't be a series). Eventually, he comes under scrutiny during the HUAC hearings, and is exiled... to France.

There've been several attempts to create a Wildcards movie, or a Wildcards TV series, but so far no-go (Melinda Snodgrass, had actually turned over a script to SyFy films, but nothing came of it).

Last edited by Haldurson; 03-03-2016 at 08:40 AM.
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