Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 03-21-2016, 01:16 PM
ThelmaLou ThelmaLou is online now
Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Neither here nor there
Posts: 11,590
Gaelic translation, please (need answer fast-ish)

I'm doing a newsletter and noting the death of an Irish priest. This Gaelic sentence was included in his obituary on the website of the funeral home.

Ar deis Dê go raib a anam dílis.

Can someone translate this for me? I want to quote it, but I want to make sure I understand exactly what it says. (Also, my client is likely to ask me.)

Google translate says:
"On the possibility of a faithful soul rape"

That doesn't sound quite right...

ETA: Okay, I found this: "May his/her soul be on God's right hand - Ar dheas Dé go raibh a anam." Also, what about the his/her?

Last edited by ThelmaLou; 03-21-2016 at 01:19 PM.
  #2  
Old 03-21-2016, 01:56 PM
donkeyoatey donkeyoatey is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: So Often, Left Blank
Posts: 1,224
Googling the whole phrase has this in the first hit

Quote:
... if the loved one was a man or boy:
Ar dheis Dé go raibh a anam dílis

although the dílis could be omitted.

Note that the d in Dé is upper case ("God with a capital G") and the next word is go NOT do.

If the loved one was woman or girl:

Ar dheis Dé go raibh a hanam dílis

It is in some ways equivalent to "May he/she rest in peace"
  #3  
Old 03-21-2016, 02:07 PM
Donnerwetter Donnerwetter is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Grand-duché de Berg
Posts: 1,932
I found a thread on a message board:

http://www.irishgaelictranslator.com...opic65565.html

Somebody inquired about almost the same quote, albeit referring to a deceased woman.
  #4  
Old 03-21-2016, 02:09 PM
hibernicus hibernicus is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Dublin, Ireland
Posts: 2,203
It means "May his faithful soul be at God's right side".
  #5  
Old 03-21-2016, 02:38 PM
ThelmaLou ThelmaLou is online now
Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Neither here nor there
Posts: 11,590
Thanks, all.
  #6  
Old 03-21-2016, 03:19 PM
Dr. Drake Dr. Drake is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Vancouver, BC
Posts: 6,116
Can I just make a minor correction to the text in the OP: should be Dé, not Dê, and it should either be "go raibh" or, if you're going to use "go raib," you need a punctum delens over the b. That also goes for the first d in "ar deis": ar dheis in modern orthography, ar ḋeis in cló gaelach. donkeyoatey's spelling is correct for Roman type. (http://nualeargais.ie/gnag/ortho_files/leni.jpg; http://historicgraves.com/sites/defa...-SBST-0009.jpg
  #7  
Old 03-21-2016, 04:24 PM
Chefguy Chefguy is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Portlandia
Posts: 38,415
Okay, I read the title as "garlic translation". I think I spend too much time in Cafe Society.

For what it's worth, though:

Portuguese: alho
Spanish: ajo
French: ail
Italian: aglio

  #8  
Old 03-21-2016, 06:40 PM
Dr. Drake Dr. Drake is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Vancouver, BC
Posts: 6,116
Irish: cneamh, gáirleóg
Scottish Gaelic: creamh, gairleag
Wesh: craf, garlleg
Breton: kignen

(the C- words are more usually wild garlic, i.e. ramson)
  #9  
Old 03-21-2016, 07:48 PM
Sage Rat Sage Rat is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Howdy
Posts: 18,637
Japanese: ニンニク (ninniku)
  #10  
Old 03-22-2016, 02:31 AM
Isilder Isilder is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 4,194
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThelmaLou View Post
I'm doing a newsletter and noting the death of an Irish priest. This Gaelic sentence was included in his obituary on the website of the funeral home.

Ar deis Dê go raib a anam dílis.

Can someone translate this for me?
Can't it be done word for word ? It is indo-european...


De cognate Deity ..

deis, right hand , cognate "dextra" ?

"dilis" faithful, cognate diligent ?

hanam . heart ? Or man ?

There was a reason latin was popular as a common language.
  #11  
Old 03-22-2016, 03:02 AM
UDS UDS is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Australia
Posts: 7,779
Quote:
Originally Posted by Isilder View Post
Can't it be done word for word ? It is indo-european...

De cognate Deity ..
Yup. From Latin, Deus.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Isilder View Post
deis, right hand , cognate "dextra" ?
Again, yup, though this time it's not from Latin. Rather, both the Latin and the Irish are from a common Indo-European root.

Curiously, the Irish and Latin works for "left hand" are unrelated.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Isilder View Post
"dilis" faithful, cognate diligent ?
Diligent is cognate, but distantly. Dílis doesn't suggest faithful in the sense of dutiful, assiduous, which is what diligent suggests to me. Rather it suggests faithful in the sense of loving, rejoicing in, taking constant delight in.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Isilder View Post
hanam . heart ? Or man ?
Neither. Cognate with Latin animus, soul or spirit.

and anam probably come straight from Latin, and arrive with Christianity. Dílis and deis are older.
  #12  
Old 03-22-2016, 09:56 AM
ThelmaLou ThelmaLou is online now
Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Neither here nor there
Posts: 11,590
Speaking of Latin, my client decided to go with Latin:

Requiescat in pace.
  #13  
Old 03-22-2016, 11:20 AM
Northern Piper Northern Piper is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jun 1999
Location: Je suis Ikea.
Posts: 25,293
Quote:
Originally Posted by UDS View Post
Diligent is cognate, but distantly. Dílis doesn't suggest faithful in the sense of dutiful, assiduous, which is what diligent suggests to me. Rather it suggests faithful in the sense of loving, rejoicing in, taking constant delight in

That is a very Irish word.
  #14  
Old 03-22-2016, 12:48 PM
Dr. Drake Dr. Drake is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Vancouver, BC
Posts: 6,116
Quote:
Originally Posted by UDS View Post
Yup. From Latin, Deus.
No: cognate. They had gods before the Christians found them, you know. In Old Irish nominative, dative, and accusative are all día, genitive and vocative .
  #15  
Old 03-23-2016, 09:48 AM
Chronos Chronos is online now
Charter Member
Moderator
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: The Land of Cleves
Posts: 73,029
What surprises me is that the Irish words for "man" and "woman" are very obviously related to the Latin ones. They're not particularly similar to the Germanic roots, which argues against it being a general Indo-European thing... but on the other hand, "man" and "woman" are quite fundamental concepts, not the sort of thing you'd expect to be loanwords.
  #16  
Old 03-23-2016, 12:52 PM
Dr. Drake Dr. Drake is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Vancouver, BC
Posts: 6,116
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chronos View Post
What surprises me is that the Irish words for "man" and "woman" are very obviously related to the Latin ones. They're not particularly similar to the Germanic roots, which argues against it being a general Indo-European thing... but on the other hand, "man" and "woman" are quite fundamental concepts, not the sort of thing you'd expect to be loanwords.
fear (OI fer, gen. fir) is cognate with vir, yes; what are the "woman" words you are calling obvious? Bean (OI ben) is cognate with Greek γυνή (as in gyno- / gyne-) but I'm not aware of a Latin cognate.

Last edited by Dr. Drake; 03-23-2016 at 12:53 PM.
  #17  
Old 03-23-2016, 02:11 PM
hibernicus hibernicus is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Dublin, Ireland
Posts: 2,203
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chronos View Post
What surprises me is that the Irish words for "man" and "woman" are very obviously related to the Latin ones. They're not particularly similar to the Germanic roots, which argues against it being a general Indo-European thing... but on the other hand, "man" and "woman" are quite fundamental concepts, not the sort of thing you'd expect to be loanwords.
Irish fear is cognate with Germanic wer as in werewolf and wereld (world). Irish bean is cognate with Germanic queen.
  #18  
Old 03-23-2016, 03:19 PM
Lemur866 Lemur866 is online now
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: The Middle of Puget Sound
Posts: 21,046
Right. "Man" is the odd one, where English lost the word for "male person" and replaced it with the word for "person". Old English wer meant a male, so you have werwolf, man-wolf, or wergild, man-price. So we have wo-man meaning a female person, but we lost wer-man, meaning a male person, instead we have man, originally meaning a person but now only meaning a male person.
  #19  
Old 03-23-2016, 03:47 PM
Chronos Chronos is online now
Charter Member
Moderator
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: The Land of Cleves
Posts: 73,029
I'm certain I remember some Irish word that looked a lot like "mulier" (one of the Latin words for "woman"), but without actually knowing Irish, it's tough to track down what it was. The context was a pair of signs on restroom doors.
  #20  
Old 03-23-2016, 04:08 PM
hibernicus hibernicus is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Dublin, Ireland
Posts: 2,203
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chronos View Post
I'm certain I remember some Irish word that looked a lot like "mulier" (one of the Latin words for "woman"), but without actually knowing Irish, it's tough to track down what it was. The context was a pair of signs on restroom doors.
Usually fir (men) and mná (women), but you may have seen some other combination.
  #21  
Old 03-23-2016, 04:20 PM
gigi gigi is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Flatlander in NH
Posts: 24,744
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThelmaLou View Post
Google translate says:
"On the possibility of a faithful soul rape"
Just morbidly curious how "May his faithful soul be at God's right side" could morph into the above.
  #22  
Old 03-23-2016, 08:00 PM
Chronos Chronos is online now
Charter Member
Moderator
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: The Land of Cleves
Posts: 73,029
Quote:
Usually fir (men) and mná (women), but you may have seen some other combination.
That might have been it, as I didn't see the doors myself, only heard about them second-hand. I'm certain the women word started with m, but the rest could have been distorted in the telling.
  #23  
Old 03-23-2016, 09:02 PM
Dr. Drake Dr. Drake is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Vancouver, BC
Posts: 6,116
Quote:
Originally Posted by gigi View Post
Just morbidly curious how "May his faithful soul be at God's right side" could morph into the above.
You can't type a little dot into google translate. So raibh, which can be spelled raiḃ, is misread by the translator-machine as ráib, which is "rape," the plant that gives you canola oil.

Last edited by Dr. Drake; 03-23-2016 at 09:02 PM.
  #24  
Old 03-23-2016, 09:54 PM
UDS UDS is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Australia
Posts: 7,779
Quote:
Originally Posted by hibernicus View Post
Usually fir (men) and mná (women), but you may have seen some other combination.
Among the many stories that Peter Ustinov used to tell on chat shows was one about his confusion when faced with toilet doors labelled fir and mná. He could read many languages, but Irish was not one of them. Eventually he calculated that thw word beginning with 'f' was likely to be in some way related to femina, and the word beginning with 'm' to masculinus, and he made his choice accordingly. He got it wrong, of course.
  #25  
Old 03-23-2016, 11:10 PM
Chronos Chronos is online now
Charter Member
Moderator
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: The Land of Cleves
Posts: 73,029
And in the story as I was told it, my mom was faced with the same conundrum, and her first thought was the same, but then she figured that "fir" looked an awful lot like "vir", and so got it right.
  #26  
Old 03-24-2016, 03:41 PM
gigi gigi is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Flatlander in NH
Posts: 24,744
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr. Drake View Post
You can't type a little dot into google translate. So raibh, which can be spelled raiḃ, is misread by the translator-machine as ráib, which is "rape," the plant that gives you canola oil.
Thanks!
  #27  
Old 03-27-2016, 06:39 PM
Northern Piper Northern Piper is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jun 1999
Location: Je suis Ikea.
Posts: 25,293
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr. Drake View Post
You can't type a little dot into google translate. So raibh, which can be spelled raiḃ, is misread by the translator-machine as ráib, which is "rape," the plant that gives you canola oil.
Getting a bit off topic, but canola oil comes from the canola plant, which is a specially bred variant from natural rapeseed.

The canola plant has a significantly lower erucic acid concentration which makes it safe to use for human consumption. Because of this difference, it has a distinct name from natural rapeseed.
  #28  
Old 03-28-2016, 10:43 AM
MacLir MacLir is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by Northern Piper View Post
Getting a bit off topic, but canola oil comes from the canola plant, which is a specially bred variant from natural rapeseed.

The canola plant has a significantly lower erucic acid concentration which makes it safe to use for human consumption. Because of this difference, it has a distinct name from natural rapeseed.
Along the same topic, the erucic acid is needed as a supplement/ medicine in adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD). See "Lorenzo's Oil."
  #29  
Old 03-28-2016, 11:15 AM
Leo Bloom Leo Bloom is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Here
Posts: 11,578
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr. Drake View Post
You can't type a little dot into google translate. So raibh, which can be spelled raiḃ, is misread by the translator-machine as ráib, which is "rape," the plant that gives you canola oil.
Which is interesting furthermore because the translator-machine, like the reader human, may confuse the "rape" of botany with the "rape" of sexual attack.
  #30  
Old 03-28-2016, 11:26 AM
Nava Nava is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Hey! I'm located! WOOOOW!
Posts: 36,763
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr. Drake View Post
You can't type a little dot into google translate. So raibh, which can be spelled raiḃ, is misread by the translator-machine as ráib, which is "rape," the plant that gives you canola oil.
It's a database problem, not a typing problem. Copy-pasting the version with the dot, it is read as if it didn't have the dot - compare with copy-pasting ano and año and telling it the original language is Spanish. In this second example, someone has actually bothered indicate the two separate translations... but the definitions under the window are given for both words and spelled with an n



The translation I get into Spanish is violación... rape as in violation and not -seed, ayup.

Last edited by Nava; 03-28-2016 at 11:27 AM.
  #31  
Old 03-28-2016, 12:05 PM
Dr. Drake Dr. Drake is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Vancouver, BC
Posts: 6,116
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nava View Post
It's a database problem, not a typing problem. Copy-pasting the version with the dot, it is read as if it didn't have the dot - compare with copy-pasting ano and año and telling it the original language is Spanish. In this second example, someone has actually bothered indicate the two separate translations... but the definitions under the window are given for both words and spelled with an n



The translation I get into Spanish is violación... rape as in violation and not -seed, ayup.
Well, not exactly, because the dot-version is (essentially) an older orthography. For a database to code both versions, it would have to enter the entire dictionary twice, just in case someone uses the old-fashioned h-free system. And there are a lot of words that are one thing with the dots, but map onto another without, as in the raibh / ráib example (especially if you ignore the fada / acute accent).

By the way, if you can't make oil from rape, what was the original rape plant used for?
  #32  
Old 03-28-2016, 07:30 PM
markn+ markn+ is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Posts: 1,104
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr. Drake View Post
By the way, if you can't make oil from rape, what was the original rape plant used for?
You can make oil from the non-canola varieties of rape, it's just not very palatable due to the glucosinolate, and not very safe to eat due to the erucic acid. According to wikipedia, it's mainly used for machinery lubrication.

--Mark
  #33  
Old 03-28-2016, 09:14 PM
UDS UDS is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Australia
Posts: 7,779
Quote:
Originally Posted by Northern Piper View Post
Getting a bit off topic, but canola oil comes from the canola plant, which is a specially bred variant from natural rapeseed.

The canola plant has a significantly lower erucic acid concentration which makes it safe to use for human consumption. Because of this difference, it has a distinct name from natural rapeseed.
I don't think this is a consistent usage outside the US and Canada. The culinary product is often referred to as, and sometimes sold as, "rapeseed oil" in other countries. Here's a Guardian article and a BBC article, both referring to it as rapeseed oil.
  #34  
Old 03-28-2016, 11:20 PM
Dr. Drake Dr. Drake is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Vancouver, BC
Posts: 6,116
Quote:
Originally Posted by UDS View Post
I don't think this is a consistent usage outside the US and Canada. The culinary product is often referred to as, and sometimes sold as, "rapeseed oil" in other countries. Here's a Guardian article and a BBC article, both referring to it as rapeseed oil.
And my cousins, who are canola farmers in Saskatchewan, always used to refer to their crop as rape (1980s, when we were last on speaking terms...).
  #35  
Old 03-29-2016, 05:44 AM
Nava Nava is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Hey! I'm located! WOOOOW!
Posts: 36,763
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr. Drake View Post
Well, not exactly, because the dot-version is (essentially) an older orthography. For a database to code both versions, it would have to enter the entire dictionary twice, just in case someone uses the old-fashioned h-free system. And there are a lot of words that are one thing with the dots, but map onto another without, as in the raibh / ráib example (especially if you ignore the fada / acute accent).
In the case of a general spelling change, it could also be possible to create a rule ("if someone enters ḃ, make it bh"), but doing that actually takes more work and computer power than having both spellings in the list.
  #36  
Old 03-29-2016, 04:09 PM
Johanna Johanna is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Oct 1999
Location: Altered States of America
Posts: 12,523
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chronos View Post
What surprises me is that the Irish words for "man" and "woman" are very obviously related to the Latin ones. They're not particularly similar to the Germanic roots, which argues against it being a general Indo-European thing... but on the other hand, "man" and "woman" are quite fundamental concepts, not the sort of thing you'd expect to be loanwords.
Italo-Celtic is a thing.
Dé / Deus
deis / dexter (compare Sanskrit dakshina: right hand, south)
dilig / delecto, delicia (delight)
Ever notice how cara means the same thing in Gaelic and Latin? Once my next door neighbor was a woman from Scotland named Cara. My first thought was how'd she get an Italian name? Second thought: oh, right: anam cara. Pure Italo-Celtic.
What is it with the 6/8 meter shared by Irish jig and Italian tarantella, anyway?

Funny how mná is an anagram of man, but it's just one of those coincidences. Mná is the plural of bean*
*pronounced "ban" but with a slender b. Although /b/ and /p/ in Irish seem to me to be the letters least affected by slenderization, so would it make less difference in this instance?

Bean is from Proto-Indo-European *gwen- 'woman' which is also the source of Greek gyne, Persian zan as in "zenana", Swedish kvinna, English queen.
  #37  
Old 03-29-2016, 05:16 PM
Dr. Drake Dr. Drake is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Vancouver, BC
Posts: 6,116
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johanna
anam cara
Punctum delens strikes again:

anam ċara (/anam xara/) (what popularized the phrase)
or
anam chara (/anam xara/)

English speakers* seem determined to project their lack of diacritics onto other languages.

*not you: this error is extremely widespread, and this phrase is almost always written cara in English contexts, rather than ċara or chara.
  #38  
Old 04-01-2016, 07:57 AM
Johanna Johanna is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Oct 1999
Location: Altered States of America
Posts: 12,523
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr. Drake View Post
Punctum delens strikes again:

anam ċara (/anam xara/) (what popularized the phrase)
or
anam chara (/anam xara/)

English speakers* seem determined to project their lack of diacritics onto other languages.

*not you: this error is extremely widespread, and this phrase is almost always written cara in English contexts, rather than ċara or chara.
Thanks for the correction! The way to spot those when unmarked would be to learn all the lenition rules, which I haven't yet done. On behalf of many languages, I share your feelings about the erasure of diacritics.
  #39  
Old 09-19-2016, 05:29 AM
Broomstick Broomstick is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: NW Indiana
Posts: 25,671
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chronos View Post
What surprises me is that the Irish words for "man" and "woman" are very obviously related to the Latin ones.
Er... why is that surprising? Irish and Latin are sister languages, descended from a common ancestor.

Do you find it surprising when a particular Spanish, French, and Italian word are all "very obviously" related?
  #40  
Old 09-19-2016, 07:07 AM
Monty Monty is offline
Straight Dope Science Advisory Board
 
Join Date: Feb 1999
Location: Beijing, China
Posts: 21,363
Quote:
Originally Posted by Isilder View Post
Can't it be done word for word ? It is indo-european...
Just because two languages are in the same language family does not mean that one can make a "word for word" translation between the two languages.

Last edited by Monty; 09-19-2016 at 07:09 AM.
  #41  
Old 09-19-2016, 07:21 AM
JKellyMap JKellyMap is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 8,278
Responding to an earlier post: It's not unusual for the word for "left" (direction) to be replaced in a language. It's called taboo replacement -- lefties being often seen as weird, even sinister.
  #42  
Old 09-19-2016, 08:25 AM
Broomstick Broomstick is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: NW Indiana
Posts: 25,671
Quote:
Originally Posted by Monty View Post
Just because two languages are in the same language family does not mean that one can make a "word for word" translation between the two languages.
Especially between languages with significantly different grammar and structure like English and Irish.

The English sentence:

"The girl is walking"

Word for word the same concept translated from Irish:

"Is the girl at walking"

In Irish the word order is Verb-Subject-Object as opposed to English which is Subject-Verb-Object. As just one example. Unlike English, you don't invert the verb and subject order to ask a question. Also, while English will change the ending of words Irish often changes the beginning of words. Another outstanding oddity: Irish has neither "yes" nor "no" as discreet words. If someone asks you "are you doing something?" you have to answer either "I am" or "I am not", you can't just say yes or no because neither of those words exist in Irish (though Irish speakers might borrow them a lot these days - they might wind up as language immigrants).

That's just the tip of the iceberg.

Which is why word-for-word translations are often confusing, nonsensical, or useless.
  #43  
Old 09-19-2016, 11:16 AM
Colibri Colibri is online now
SD Curator of Critters
Moderator
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Panama
Posts: 37,503
Quote:
Originally Posted by JKellyMap View Post
It's called taboo replacement -- lefties being often seen as weird, even sinister.
I see what you did there.

Interestingly, the Spanish words for "left," izquierdo, and "left-handed," zurdo appear to be derived or related from the Basque terms rather than Indo-European.
  #44  
Old 09-19-2016, 11:45 AM
JKellyMap JKellyMap is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 8,278
Quote:
Originally Posted by Colibri View Post
I see what you did there.

Interestingly, the Spanish words for "left," izquierdo, and "left-handed," zurdo appear to be derived or related from the Basque terms rather than Indo-European.
Exactly. Perfect example.

Apparently, the Germanic words for "bear" (including English) are another example -- "the brown one [whose real name must not be spoken, lest it eat me]."

Last edited by JKellyMap; 09-19-2016 at 11:47 AM.
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:20 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

Send questions for Cecil Adams to: cecil@chicagoreader.com

Send comments about this website to: webmaster@straightdope.com

Terms of Use / Privacy Policy

Advertise on the Straight Dope!
(Your direct line to thousands of the smartest, hippest people on the planet, plus a few total dipsticks.)

Publishers - interested in subscribing to the Straight Dope?
Write to: sdsubscriptions@chicagoreader.com.

Copyright © 2017 Sun-Times Media, LLC.

 
Copyright © 2017