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Old 05-25-2016, 02:21 PM
Dante G Dante G is offline
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Made up words or Words You Use Wrong For Fun

Just for fun, are there any words you have made up? Or any words you use that are real words, but you use them intentionally wrong?

For me, I use the real word "flibbertigibbet". I use it as a substitute for "F***". Screw up on something, or something goes wrong at work - "FLIBBERTIGIBBET!"
  #2  
Old 05-25-2016, 02:38 PM
Intergalactic Gladiator Intergalactic Gladiator is offline
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Cromulanet and embiggen, from the Simpsons.

I occasionally use disagrievance.

Last edited by Intergalactic Gladiator; 05-25-2016 at 02:39 PM.
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Old 05-25-2016, 02:50 PM
Doctor Jackson Doctor Jackson is offline
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You know the big buildings that have doctors and nurses and, most often, an ER? Those are Horsenpistols.
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Old 05-25-2016, 03:02 PM
Soylent Juicy Soylent Juicy is offline
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I say "amberlamps" for ambulance because of that video a long time ago. (Google "amber lamps" if you want to know.)
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Old 05-25-2016, 03:05 PM
QuickSilver QuickSilver is offline
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The "Schmall".

From a nearby mall of my youth where you'd see all the old retired folks gathered in the food court to schmooze.
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Old 05-25-2016, 04:57 PM
burpo the wonder mutt burpo the wonder mutt is offline
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I hate the hiccup in the middle of the word, so I call them "vegables" (vej-uh-bulz).

Last edited by burpo the wonder mutt; 05-25-2016 at 04:58 PM.
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Old 05-25-2016, 05:13 PM
Maggie the Ocelot Maggie the Ocelot is offline
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Tons of 'em, I like to play with words.

I use "coagulate" for "get together". As in, "Okay, Rachel and I will go to Fantasyland, Jack and Bob will go ride Indy, and we'll coagulate at Pizza Port at 4:00."

The day after Friday is Satyrday.

There are others if I can only think of them....
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Old 05-25-2016, 09:49 PM
tenacious j tenacious j is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Intergalactic Gladiator View Post
Cromulanet and embiggen, from the Simpsons.

I occasionally use disagrievance.
The Simpsons have completely mangled my vocabulary. Inspired by Homerisms like saxomophone, or household adds "MA" to almost any random 3-syllable word, like "telemavision". Like you would say, made up words are perfectly cromulent around here.
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Old 05-25-2016, 09:52 PM
Mona Lisa Simpson Mona Lisa Simpson is offline
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I like calling the strange unintentional words or phrases my phone makes "autocarrots".
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Old 05-25-2016, 10:23 PM
Balance Balance is online now
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I use bits and pieces from various partial conlangs I've encountered over the years, sometimes in place of profanity and sometime just to express something succinctly.

For example, I'm fond of "noy j'taht", a bit of fictional profanity from the long-ago cartoon Pirates of Dark Water. The sound of it just conveys exasperation so well, without actually being offensive. I use "get'ke" from Lackey's Shin'a'in language to express sentiments that encompass "please elaborate", "explain yourself", and "WTF?" In text media like chat, I often use a single question mark for the same purpose. (Oddly enough, people respond to "get'ke" pretty often; I guess the tone gets the meaning across.)
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Old 05-26-2016, 03:35 AM
Senegoid Senegoid is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tenacious j View Post
The Simpsons have completely mangled my vocabulary. Inspired by Homerisms like saxomophone, or household adds "MA" to almost any random 3-syllable word, like "telemavision". Like you would say, made up words are perfectly cromulent around here.
Wasn't that done by Popeye a long time ago? I definomitely remember an epimasode in which he gets edumacated.
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Old 05-26-2016, 10:10 AM
Annie-Xmas Annie-Xmas is offline
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I throw the word "hurple" into conversations whenever I can. Which isn't often.
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Old 05-26-2016, 10:51 AM
FairyChatMom FairyChatMom is offline
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I used to use razzenfratz as my go-to cuss word when I was young and disinclined to utter profanity.

Similarly, my spousal unit and I will call someone a cheese log rather than say asshole or worse when confronted with said person's idiotic behavior. It's also been applied to the dog on occasion. It's a curiously satisfying expression!
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Old 05-26-2016, 11:30 AM
Mona Lisa Simpson Mona Lisa Simpson is offline
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Of course my mother and I say "misled" with a "long i" sound, like miser has. We both mispronounced the word in our heads for years until we were corrected. I know others have mentioned it here too.
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  #15  
Old 05-26-2016, 11:42 AM
kayaker kayaker is offline
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Not sure why/how, but for eons I've used "egg-salad" to mean "excellent".

I also use "ironic" intentionally incorrectly (ironically?). The other night I asked a friend if he was wearing the shirt he had on ironically. He looked down at his shirt, then looked at me, all puzzled. "Why?", he asked, and I pointed out that it was wrinkled and needed to be ironed. We then went back and forth a bit before he realized I was just fucking around.
  #16  
Old 05-26-2016, 11:47 AM
Totenfeier Totenfeier is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mona Lisa Simpson View Post
Of course my mother and I say "misled" with a "long i" sound, like miser has. We both mispronounced the word in our heads for years until we were corrected. I know others have mentioned it here too.
My dad had that problem too. He was an educated man, and laughed about it after the fact, but he always read "misled" that way - and didn't, for a long time, connect it with the idea of "mis - leading;" he said he just thought that "misling" was something bad that people did to somebody.

As for me, I long thought that I was the clever one who invented "coolth" as the opposite of "warmth." Imagine the crushing disappointment when I finally Googled it and discovered that it has citations going back to the 1500s!
  #17  
Old 05-26-2016, 11:55 AM
teela brown teela brown is offline
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I like to say "Sprawl-mart" for "Walmart". I think I heard it on the Simpsons. Occasional variation: "Mall-wart".

I also say "cripsy" for "crispy". I think it was an honest mispronouncement the first time or two, but now I say it on purpose.
  #18  
Old 05-26-2016, 12:50 PM
gigi gigi is offline
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I perked up when I heard someone else use "Bloodbath and Beyond" the other day.

I use "dooficity" to describe the quality of being a doofus, thanks to a long-ago friend.
  #19  
Old 05-26-2016, 01:31 PM
UncleRojelio UncleRojelio is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Doctor Jackson View Post
You know the big buildings that have doctors and nurses and, most often, an ER? Those are Horsenpistols.
Hopsicles for me. I think it came from watching too much Rugrats when my kids were younger.
  #20  
Old 05-26-2016, 01:40 PM
Totenfeier Totenfeier is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by teela brown View Post
I like to say "Sprawl-mart" for "Walmart". I think I heard it on the Simpsons. Occasional variation: "Mall-wart".

I also say "cripsy" for "crispy". I think it was an honest mispronouncement the first time or two, but now I say it on purpose.
This isn't a make-up, but following my father-in-law, we always say "Wally World" for Walmart.
  #21  
Old 05-26-2016, 03:27 PM
OffByOne OffByOne is offline
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When rain falls and drains into creeks which drain into rivers which drain into the ocean, it evaporates, rises into the sky as water vapor, forms clouds, and then falls again as rain.

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  #22  
Old 05-26-2016, 03:30 PM
Spectre of Pithecanthropus Spectre of Pithecanthropus is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Totenfeier View Post
This isn't a make-up, but following my father-in-law, we always say "Wally World" for Walmart.
I believe "Wally World" is almost universally understood for Wal-Mart these days. However, I think it first appeared as the name of a fictional amusement park ("Walley World") in the film National Lampoon's Vacation. This was in 1983; Walmart already existed but was nothing like the gigantic discount retail chain it is today.
  #23  
Old 05-26-2016, 03:38 PM
purplehearingaid purplehearingaid is offline
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I call my rain coat a rainingcoat and it would bug the hell out of roommate a school !
  #24  
Old 05-26-2016, 03:45 PM
Totenfeier Totenfeier is offline
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I didn't mean to imply that I thought we were the only ones who used Wally World for Walmart.
  #25  
Old 05-26-2016, 03:46 PM
Sir T-Cups Sir T-Cups is offline
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I have a bunch!

I still and will forever say sammitch. I also say "Subway eat fresh" as if that is the formal title of the restaurant.

I substitute "berry" for "very" whenever I type or text. I also do the same with aboot for about, and sometimes I'll intentionally say sext.

I'll also say "brb a sex" because that used to be a common typo of mine so I just went a head and did it full-time.

I intentionally say aminals instead of the right way of saying it. I'm sure I have more but these are the top ones
  #26  
Old 05-26-2016, 04:16 PM
Mrs Fairway Mrs Fairway is offline
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I think all of mine come from my sister's kids.

Hankaburger for hamburger
Frijafator for refrigerator
Tomarno for tomorrow
We don't go on vacation, we go on "the cation"
Snantzy - combo of snazzy and fancy
Air Kachine for air conditioning
  #27  
Old 05-26-2016, 04:26 PM
Balance Balance is online now
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Hopsicles for me. I think it came from watching too much Rugrats when my kids were younger.
"Hopsicle" sounds like it should be the trade name for frozen beer on a stick.
  #28  
Old 05-26-2016, 04:27 PM
Zyanthia Zyanthia is offline
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I had the hardest time learning to say cinnamon. Now I say cimmanon on purpose, just because it reminds me of making apple pie with mom.
  #29  
Old 05-26-2016, 04:33 PM
WordMan WordMan is offline
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I verbify words as needed.

I use nouns like badassery and geekery regularly.

If someone is making something out of nothing, I ask if they are "consciously kerfuffling" or just high drama by nature.

Stuff like that there.
  #30  
Old 05-26-2016, 05:25 PM
Chimera Chimera is offline
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"Scrunchies" for cat treats.

"Smedley" flavor for the 'seafood medley'.

"Snoggling" for kissing and snuggling.
  #31  
Old 05-26-2016, 05:35 PM
IvoryTowerDenizen IvoryTowerDenizen is offline
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Spleep for sleep.

There was a website for a doctor who treated sleep disorders who must have had an unfortunate copy-paste error because every place it should have said 'sleep' it said 'spleep'.

Paragraphs and paragraphs of text.

It was so funny and we've adopted that word ever since.
  #32  
Old 05-26-2016, 05:53 PM
kayaker kayaker is offline
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Originally Posted by Mrs Fairway View Post
I think all of mine come from my sister's kids.
There's a city near us called Monroeville. I discovered that my son honestly thought the name was Maroneville when he was waaay to old to laugh it off as a kid thing.

My daughter, my son, and I still all call it Maroneville.
  #33  
Old 05-26-2016, 06:21 PM
AskNott AskNott is offline
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"Ohh-h-h--h-h, I made a fox's paw !"

Refrigigator.

Posspickles.
  #34  
Old 05-26-2016, 06:27 PM
tapu tapu is offline
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I've apologized gratuitously. I've also flatulently accepted the apologies of others.
  #35  
Old 05-26-2016, 07:21 PM
Prof. Pepperwinkle Prof. Pepperwinkle is offline
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After the first Avengers movie my friends and family all started calling the scenes among and after the credits "schwarma".
  #36  
Old 05-26-2016, 07:53 PM
Periwinkle Periwinkle is offline
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My husband used to call the Bob Evans restaurant "Blob Evans" (for anyone not familiar, their specialty was very fattening breakfast stuff). He also called Bedminster NJ (where he had to travel for work sometimes) "Dreadminster". We call crab forks "pokies" because that's what our German friend who didn't know the right word for them called them, and I thought it was an improvement!
  #37  
Old 05-26-2016, 09:21 PM
ASGuy ASGuy is offline
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I'll mention three.

(1) I've always enjoyed the British way of pronouncing aluminum and schedule. So I deliberately say them the British way: al-u-min-ium and sched-u-l. I never have to clarify this British way.

(2) Growing up in the San Fernando valley I so often heard eucalyptus mispronounced as u-cal-a-pee-tus that I now deliberately mispronounce it. I rarely have to explain my pronounciation.

(3) I did not learn the proper way to pronounce debacle until I was 35 or so. Yow! But when I learned the proper way I always thought of Jim Backus. So now I deliberately say de-backus when I mean debacle. This usually requires clarification.

I have more but these are the fun ones.
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Old 05-26-2016, 09:29 PM
JKellyMap JKellyMap is offline
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I use "encharge" to mean "put in charge of; entrust with a responsibility." I speak pretty fluent Spanish, and the first time I used it was by accident -- I assumed there was an English cognate to encargar, because there should be one. (I suppose the English word "charge" can be used to mean this, but this word has other, more common meanings, so it sounds funny to use it in this way).
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Old 05-26-2016, 09:31 PM
JKellyMap JKellyMap is offline
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Oh, and "Abyssinia" for "I'll be seeing you."
  #40  
Old 05-27-2016, 07:26 AM
Totenfeier Totenfeier is offline
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I'll often use telly-o-phone.
  #41  
Old 05-27-2016, 08:29 AM
WordMan WordMan is offline
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I thought of another one. I do strategy work: helping companies clarify their target market position, strategic priorities, and the tactics to get there. This often involves taking a bunch of executives through a thoughtful, complex discussion to figure out what they all agree about.

When it appears that we have captured what the group wants, I will sometimes ask: "so - is that more better?"
  #42  
Old 05-27-2016, 01:48 PM
gigi gigi is offline
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I had the hardest time learning to say cinnamon. Now I say cimmanon on purpose, just because it reminds me of making apple pie with mom.
I have to stop myself from saying cinnaminamin.
  #43  
Old 05-27-2016, 02:17 PM
UncleRojelio UncleRojelio is offline
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A few more:

backsplash instead of backslash
hiccemups instead of hiccups
vedication instead of vacation (from when my kids were young)
elphanents instead of elephants
  #44  
Old 05-27-2016, 02:29 PM
iamthewalrus(:3= iamthewalrus(:3= is offline
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A friend started calling any non-motorized wheeled vehicle that didn't exist when we were kids a "skate-cycle", as in "Dang kids with their skate-cycles", and it's stuck.
  #45  
Old 05-27-2016, 02:33 PM
BrotherCadfael BrotherCadfael is offline
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Two of mine:

"Aluminimum foil" (No, that's NOT the British spelling!)

"BYEW-tocks" (per Ensign Pulver)
  #46  
Old 05-27-2016, 03:04 PM
Soylent Juicy Soylent Juicy is offline
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I call No Frills (grocery store) "No Thrills". Trust me, it fits.
  #47  
Old 05-27-2016, 04:05 PM
Totenfeier Totenfeier is offline
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I mess with French.

"Sest la vye, as them thar French say!"

And around our house, two stores are known as tar-ZHAY and ZHAY-CEE-pee-NAY.
  #48  
Old 05-27-2016, 05:06 PM
AskNott AskNott is offline
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Around 1960, my parents went to Europe for a month. They came back joking about the UK tour guide who said, "Now, here's the drill," before laying out the "SHED-jule." That became part of the family usage from then on. They said Italian waiters would set down the food, make an open-handed here-it-is gesture toward it, and say, "So!" I still do that sometimes.
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  #49  
Old 05-27-2016, 07:33 PM
Hari Seldon Hari Seldon is offline
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I always say nump or numpire for umpire and napron for apron. These are etymologically correct, those being the original words.
  #50  
Old 05-27-2016, 09:57 PM
GinoC GinoC is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Intergalactic Gladiator View Post
Cromulanet and embiggen, from the Simpsons.

I occasionally use disagrievance.
My daughter was in her mid-teens before she realized cromulent wasn't a real word. She was a bit miffed at her parents.
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